384

Does anyone know whether there is an assert or something like that which can test whether an exception was thrown in the code being tested?

2
  • 3
    To those answers: what about multi-assertions in a test function, and I just expect to have one throw exception ? Do I HAVE to separate them and put the one in an independent test function ? – Panwen Wang Jan 22 '16 at 8:04
  • @PanwenWang To test multiple exceptions or multiple returns from an exception's getters, see this answer – Jimmix Apr 18 at 9:56

15 Answers 15

618
<?php
require_once 'PHPUnit/Framework.php';

class ExceptionTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    public function testException()
    {
        $this->expectException(InvalidArgumentException::class);
        // or for PHPUnit < 5.2
        // $this->setExpectedException(InvalidArgumentException::class);

        //...and then add your test code that generates the exception 
        exampleMethod($anInvalidArgument);
    }
}

expectException() PHPUnit documentation

PHPUnit author article provides detailed explanation on testing exceptions best practices.

10
  • 11
    If you use namespaces, well you need to enter the full namespace: $this->setExpectedException('\My\Name\Space\MyCustomException'); – Alcalyn Nov 25 '14 at 15:50
  • 18
    The fact that you can't designate the precise line of code that is expected to throw, is an error IMO. And the inability to test for more than one exception in the same test, makes testing for many expected exceptions a really clunky affair. I wrote an actual assertion to try to solve those problems. – mindplay.dk Aug 24 '15 at 19:08
  • 20
    FYI: as of phpunit 5.2.0 setExpectedException method is deprecated, replaced with the expectException one. :) – hejdav Mar 1 '16 at 15:05
  • 49
    What's not mentioned in the docs or here, but the code expected to throw an exception needs to be called after expectException(). While it might have been obvious to some, it was a gotcha for me. – Jason McCreary Nov 13 '16 at 18:14
  • 12
    It's not obvious from the doc, but no code after your function that throws an exception will be executed. So if you want to test multiple exceptions in the same test case you cannot. – laurent May 30 '17 at 15:58
127

You can also use a docblock annotation until PHPUnit 9 is released:

class ExceptionTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    /**
     * @expectedException InvalidArgumentException
     */
    public function testException()
    {
        ...
    }
}

For PHP 5.5+ (especially with namespaced code), I now prefer using ::class

11
  • 3
    IMO, this is the preferred method. – Mike Purcell Jun 15 '12 at 20:16
  • 14
    @LeviMorrison - IMHO the exception message should not be tested, similarly to log messages. Both are considered extraneous, helpful information when performing manual forensics. The key point to test is the type of exception. Anything beyond that is binding too tightly to the implementation. IncorrectPasswordException should be enough--that the message equals "Wrong password for bob@me.com" is ancillary. Add to that that you want to spend as little time writing tests as possible, and you begin to see how important simple tests become. – David Harkness Sep 5 '13 at 5:26
  • 6
    @DavidHarkness I figured someone would bring that up. Similarly I would agree that testing messages in general is too strict and tight. However it is that strictness and tight binding that may (emphasized purposefully) be what is wanted in some situations, such as the enforcement of a spec. – Levi Morrison Sep 6 '13 at 5:40
  • 2
    I wouldn't watch in a doc-block to understand what it expected, but I'd look at the actual test code (regardless the kind of test). That's the standard for all the other tests; I don't see valid reasons for Exceptions to be (oh god) an exception to this convention. – Kamafeather Mar 27 '15 at 9:52
  • 4
    The "don't test the message" rule sounds valid, unless you test a method which throws the same exception type in multiple parts of code, with the only difference being the error id, which is passed in the message. Your system might display a message to the user based on the Exception message (not the Exception type). In that case, it does matter which message the user sees, hence, you should test the error message. – Vanja D. Apr 20 '18 at 15:38
36

If you're running on PHP 5.5+, you can use ::class resolution to obtain the name of the class with expectException/setExpectedException. This provides several benefits:

  • The name will be fully-qualified with its namespace (if any).
  • It resolves to a string so it will work with any version of PHPUnit.
  • You get code-completion in your IDE.
  • The PHP compiler will emit an error if you mistype the class name.

Example:

namespace \My\Cool\Package;

class AuthTest extends \PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    public function testLoginFailsForWrongPassword()
    {
        $this->expectException(WrongPasswordException::class);
        Auth::login('Bob', 'wrong');
    }
}

PHP compiles

WrongPasswordException::class

into

"\My\Cool\Package\WrongPasswordException"

without PHPUnit being the wiser.

Note: PHPUnit 5.2 introduced expectException as a replacement for setExpectedException.

0
35

Code below will test exception message and exception code.

Important: It will fail if expected exception not thrown too.

try{
    $test->methodWhichWillThrowException();//if this method not throw exception it must be fail too.
    $this->fail("Expected exception 1162011 not thrown");
}catch(MySpecificException $e){ //Not catching a generic Exception or the fail function is also catched
    $this->assertEquals(1162011, $e->getCode());
    $this->assertEquals("Exception Message", $e->getMessage());
}
4
  • 7
    $this->fail() isn't meant to be used this way I don't think, at least not currently (PHPUnit 3.6.11); it acts as an exception itself. Using your example, if $this->fail("Expected exception not thrown") is called, then the catch block is triggered and $e->getMessage() is "Expected exception not thrown". – ken Apr 16 '14 at 21:33
  • 1
    @ken you're probably right. The call to fail probably belongs after the catch block, not inside the try. – Frank Farmer Apr 22 '14 at 20:41
  • 2
    I have to downvote because the call to fail should not be in the try block. It in itself triggers the catch block producing false results. – Twifty Apr 9 '15 at 21:53
  • 7
    I believe the reason this doesn't work well is some situation is that it's catching all exceptions with catch(Exception $e). This method works quite well for me when I try to catch specific Exceptions: try { throw new MySpecificException; $this->fail('MySpecificException not thrown'); } catch(MySpecificException $e){} – spyle May 4 '15 at 13:55
33

An alternative way can be the following:

$this->expectException(\InvalidArgumentException::class);
$this->expectExceptionMessage('Expected Exception Message');

Please ensure that your test class extents \PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase.

3
  • For sure the most sugar in this syntax – AndrewMcLagan Dec 4 '19 at 4:03
  • 2
    It seems that expectExceptionMessage behaves as a Regex. If your error message is 'Foo bar Baz', $this->expectExceptionMessage('Foo'); will make the test pass. – Lucas Bustamante Jun 25 '20 at 17:08
  • 2
    this is the one! also, expectExceptionCode(401) – darryn.ten Oct 15 '20 at 3:02
24

You can use assertException extension to assert more than one exception during one test execution.

Insert method into your TestCase and use:

public function testSomething()
{
    $test = function() {
        // some code that has to throw an exception
    };
    $this->assertException( $test, 'InvalidArgumentException', 100, 'expected message' );
}

I also made a trait for lovers of nice code..

2
  • Which PHPUnit are you using? I am using PHPUnit 4.7.5, and there assertException is not defined. I also cannot find it in the PHPUnit manual. – physicalattraction Jul 22 '15 at 8:34
  • 2
    The asertException method is not part of original PHPUnit. You must inherit the PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase class and add method linked in post above manually. Your test cases will then inherit this inherited class. – hejdav Jul 27 '15 at 11:40
19

The PHPUnit expectException method is very inconvenient because it allows to test only one exception per a test method.

I've made this helper function to assert that some function throws an exception:

/**
 * Asserts that the given callback throws the given exception.
 *
 * @param string $expectClass The name of the expected exception class
 * @param callable $callback A callback which should throw the exception
 */
protected function assertException(string $expectClass, callable $callback)
{
    try {
        $callback();
    } catch (\Throwable $exception) {
        $this->assertInstanceOf($expectClass, $exception, 'An invalid exception was thrown');
        return;
    }

    $this->fail('No exception was thrown');
}

Add it to your test class and call this way:

public function testSomething() {
    $this->assertException(\PDOException::class, function() {
        new \PDO('bad:param');
    });
    $this->assertException(\PDOException::class, function() {
        new \PDO('foo:bar');
    });
}
2
  • Definitely the best solution out of all of the answers! Throw it into a trait and package it! – domdambrogia Jan 9 '19 at 22:59
  • Thanks to the Data Providers you can test multiple exceptions using $this->expectException() per single test method. More info – Jimmix Apr 18 at 20:32
12

Comprehensive Solution

PHPUnit's current "best practices" for exception testing seem.. lackluster (docs).

Since I wanted more than the current expectException implementation, I made a trait to use on my test cases. It's only ~50 lines of code.

  • Supports multiple exceptions per test
  • Supports assertions called after the exception is thrown
  • Robust and clear usage examples
  • Standard assert syntax
  • Supports assertions for more than just message, code, and class
  • Supports inverse assertion, assertNotThrows
  • Supports PHP 7 Throwable errors

Library

I published the AssertThrows trait to Github and packagist so it can be installed with composer.

Simple Example

Just to illustrate the spirit behind the syntax:

<?php

// Using simple callback
$this->assertThrows(MyException::class, [$obj, 'doSomethingBad']);

// Using anonymous function
$this->assertThrows(MyException::class, function() use ($obj) {
    $obj->doSomethingBad();
});

Pretty neat?


Full Usage Example

Please see below for a more comprehensive usage example:

<?php

declare(strict_types=1);

use Jchook\AssertThrows\AssertThrows;
use PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase;

// These are just for illustration
use MyNamespace\MyException;
use MyNamespace\MyObject;

final class MyTest extends TestCase
{
    use AssertThrows; // <--- adds the assertThrows method

    public function testMyObject()
    {
        $obj = new MyObject();

        // Test a basic exception is thrown
        $this->assertThrows(MyException::class, function() use ($obj) {
            $obj->doSomethingBad();
        });

        // Test custom aspects of a custom extension class
        $this->assertThrows(MyException::class, 
            function() use ($obj) {
                $obj->doSomethingBad();
            },
            function($exception) {
                $this->assertEquals('Expected value', $exception->getCustomThing());
                $this->assertEquals(123, $exception->getCode());
            }
        );

        // Test that a specific exception is NOT thrown
        $this->assertNotThrows(MyException::class, function() use ($obj) {
            $obj->doSomethingGood();
        });
    }
}

?>
2
  • 6
    A little ironic that your package for unit testing doesn't include unit tests in the repo. – domdambrogia Jan 9 '19 at 22:56
  • 2
    @domdambrogia thanks to @jean-beguin it now has unit tests. – jchook Mar 5 '19 at 19:06
11
public function testException() {
    try {
        $this->methodThatThrowsException();
        $this->fail("Expected Exception has not been raised.");
    } catch (Exception $ex) {
        $this->assertEquals("Exception message", $ex->getMessage());
    }
    
}
1
  • The signature of assertEquals() is assertEquals(mixed $expected, mixed $actual...), reverse as in your example, so it should be $this->assertEquals("Exception message", $ex->getMessage()); – Roger Campanera Oct 21 '19 at 16:06
6

Here's all the exception assertions you can do. Note that all of them are optional.

class ExceptionTest extends PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase
{
    public function testException()
    {
        // make your exception assertions
        $this->expectException(InvalidArgumentException::class);
        // if you use namespaces:
        // $this->expectException('\Namespace\MyExceptio‌​n');
        $this->expectExceptionMessage('message');
        $this->expectExceptionMessageRegExp('/essage$/');
        $this->expectExceptionCode(123);
        // code that throws an exception
        throw new InvalidArgumentException('message', 123);
   }

   public function testAnotherException()
   {
        // repeat as needed
        $this->expectException(Exception::class);
        throw new Exception('Oh no!');
    }
}

Documentation can be found here.

1
  • 1
    It is incorrect because PHP stops on the first thrown exception. PHPUnit checks that the thrown exception has the correct type and says «the test is OK», it doesn't even know about the second exception. – Finesse Oct 27 '17 at 10:19
3
/**
 * @expectedException Exception
 * @expectedExceptionMessage Amount has to be bigger then 0!
 */
public function testDepositNegative()
{
    $this->account->deposit(-7);
}

Be very carefull about "/**", notice the double "*". Writing only "**"(asterix) will fail your code. Also make sure your using last version of phpUnit. In some earlier versions of phpunit @expectedException Exception is not supported. I had 4.0 and it didn't work for me, I had to update to 5.5 https://coderwall.com/p/mklvdw/install-phpunit-with-composer to update with composer.

2

TLDR; scroll to: Use PHPUnit's Data Provider

PHPUnit 9.5 offers following methods to test exceptions:

$this->expectException(string $exceptionClassName);
$this->expectExceptionCode(int|string $code);
$this->expectExceptionMessage(string $message);
$this->expectExceptionMessageMatches(string $regularExpression);
$this->expectExceptionObject(\Exception $exceptionObject);

However the Documentation is vague about the order of any of the above methods in the test code.

If you get used to using assertions for example:

<?php

class SimpleAssertionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testSimpleAssertion(): void
    {
        $expected = 'bar';
        $actual = 'bar';
        $this->assertSame($expected, $actual);
    }
}

output:

 ✔ Simple assertion
OK (1 test, 1 assertion)

you may be surprised by failing the exception test:

<?php

use PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase;

final class ExceptionTest extends TestCase
{
    public function testException(): void
    {
        throw new \InvalidArgumentException();
        $this->expectException(\InvalidArgumentException::class);
    }
}

output:

 ✘ Exception
   ├ InvalidArgumentException:

ERRORS!
Tests: 1, Assertions: 0, Errors: 1.

The error is because:

Once an exception is thrown the PHP can not return to the line of code that comes after the line that thrown the exception. Catching an exception changes nothing in this regard. Throwing an exception is a one way ticket.

Unlike errors, exceptions don't have a capability to recover from them and make PHP continue code execution as if there was no exception at all.

Therefore PHPUnit does not even reach the place:

$this->expectException(\InvalidArgumentException::class);

if it was preceded by:

throw new \InvalidArgumentException();

Moreover, PHPUnit will never be able to reach that place, no matter its exception catching capabilities.

Therefore using any of the PHPUnit's exception testing methods:

$this->expectException(string $exceptionClassName);
$this->expectExceptionCode(int|string $code);
$this->expectExceptionMessage(string $message);
$this->expectExceptionMessageMatches(string $regularExpression);
$this->expectExceptionObject(\Exception $exceptionObject);

must be before a code where an exception is expected to be thrown in contrary to an assertion that is placed after an actual value is set.

A proper order of using exception test:

<?php

use PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase;

final class ExceptionTest extends TestCase
{
    public function testException(): void
    {
        $this->expectException(\InvalidArgumentException::class);
        throw new \InvalidArgumentException();
    }
}

Because call to PHPUnit internal methods for testing exceptions must be before an exception is thrown it makes sense that PHPUnit methods related to test exceptions start from $this->excpect instead of $this->assert.

Knowing already that:

Once an exception is thrown the PHP can not return to the line of code that comes after the line that thrown the exception.

You should be able to easily spot a bug in this test:

<?php
namespace VendorName\PackageName;

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testThrowException(): void
    {
        # Should be OK
        $this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
        throw new \RuntimeException();

        # Should Fail
        $this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
        throw new \InvalidArgumentException();
    }
}

The first $this->expectException() should be OK, it expects an exception class before an exact exception class as expected is thrown so nothing wrong here.

The second that should fail expects RuntimeException class before a completely different exception is thrown so it should fail but will PHPUnit execution reach that place at all?

The test's output is:

 ✔ Throw exception

OK (1 test, 1 assertion)

OK?

No it is far from OK if the test passes and it should Fail on the second exception. Why is that?

Note that the output has:

OK (1 test, 1 assertion)

where the count of tests is right but there is only 1 assertion.

There should be 2 assertions = OK and Fail that makes test not passing.

That's simply because PHPUnit is done with executing testThrowException after the line:

throw new \RuntimeException();

that is a one way ticket outside the scope of the testThrowException to somewhere where PHPUnit catches the \RuntimeException and does what it needs to do, but whatever it could do we know it will not be able to jump back into testThrowException hence the code:

# Should Fail
$this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
throw new \InvalidArgumentException();

will never be executed and that's why from PHPUnit point of view the test result is OK instead of Fail.

That's not a good news if you would like to use multiple $this->expectException() or a mix of $this->expectException() and $this->expectExceptionMessage() calls in the same test method:

<?php
namespace VendorName\PackageName;

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testThrowException(): void
    {
        # OK
        $this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
        throw new \RuntimeException('Something went wrong');

        # Fail
        $this->expectExceptionMessage('This code will never be executed');
        throw new \RuntimeException('Something went wrong');
    }
}

gives wrong:

OK (1 test, 1 assertion)

because once an exception is thrown all other $this->expect... calls related to testing exceptions will not be executed and the PHPUnit test case result will only contain the result of the first expected exception.

How to test multiple Exceptions?

Split multiple exceptions into separate tests:

<?php
namespace VendorName\PackageName;

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testThrowExceptionBar(): void
    {
        # OK
        $this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
        throw new \RuntimeException();
    }

    public function testThrowExceptionFoo(): void
    {
        # Fail
        $this->expectException(\RuntimeException::class);
        throw new \InvalidArgumentException();
    }
}

gives:

 ✔ Throw exception bar
 ✘ Throw exception foo
   ┐
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "InvalidArgumentException" matches expected exception "RuntimeException". Message was: "" at

FAILURES!
Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 1.

FAILURES as it should.

This method however has a downside at its fundamental approach - for every exception thrown you need a separate test. That will make a flood of tests just to check exceptions.

Catch an exception and check it with an assertion

If you can't continue script execution after an exception was thrown you may simply catch an expected exception and later get all data about it with the methods an exception provides and use that with combination of expected values and assertions:

<?php
namespace VendorName\PackageName;

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testThrowException(): void
    {
        # OK
        unset($className);
        try {
            $location = __FILE__ . ':' . (string) (__LINE__ + 1);
            throw new \RuntimeException('Something went wrong'); 

        } catch (\Exception $e) {
            $className = get_class($e);
            $msg = $e->getMessage();
            $code = $e->getCode();
        }

        $expectedClass = \RuntimeException::class;
        $expectedMsg = 'Something went wrong';
        $expectedCode = 0;

        if (empty($className)) {
            $failMsg = 'Exception: ' . $expectedClass;
            $failMsg .= ' with msg: ' . $expectedMsg;
            $failMsg .= ' and code: ' . $expectedCode;
            $failMsg .= ' at: ' . $location;
            $failMsg .= ' Not Thrown!';
            $this->fail($failMsg);
        }

        $this->assertSame($expectedClass, $className);
        $this->assertSame($expectedMsg, $msg);
        $this->assertSame($expectedCode, $code);

        # ------------------------------------------

        # Fail
        unset($className);
        try {
            $location = __FILE__ . ':' . (string) (__LINE__ + 1);
            throw new \InvalidArgumentException('I MUST FAIL !'); 

        } catch (\Exception $e) {
            $className = get_class($e);
            $msg = $e->getMessage();
            $code = $e->getCode();
        }

        $expectedClass = \InvalidArgumentException::class;
        $expectedMsg = 'Something went wrong';
        $expectedCode = 0;

        if (empty($className)) {
            $failMsg = 'Exception: ' . $expectedClass;
            $failMsg .= ' with msg: ' . $expectedMsg;
            $failMsg .= ' and code: ' . $expectedCode;
            $failMsg .= ' at: ' . $location;
            $failMsg .= ' Not Thrown!';
            $this->fail($failMsg);
        }

        $this->assertSame($expectedClass, $className);
        $this->assertSame($expectedMsg, $msg);
        $this->assertSame($expectedCode, $code);
    }
}

gives:

 ✘ Throw exception
   ┐
   ├ Failed asserting that two strings are identical.
   ┊ ---·Expected
   ┊ +++·Actual
   ┊ @@ @@
   ┊ -'Something·went·wrong'
   ┊ +'I·MUST·FAIL·!'

FAILURES!
Tests: 1, Assertions: 5, Failures: 1.

FAILURES as it should but oh my lord, did you read all that above? You need to take care for clearing variables unset($className); to detect if an exception was thrown, then this creature $location = __FILE__ ... to have a precise location of the exception in case it was not thrown, then checking if the exception was thrown if (empty($className)) { ... } and using $this->fail($failMsg); to signal if the exception was not thrown.

Use PHPUnit's Data Provider

PHPUnit has a helpful mechanism called a Data Provider. A data provider is a method that returns the data (array) with data sets. A single data set is used as the argument(s) when a test method - testThrowException is called by PHPUnit.

If the data provider returns more than one data set then the test method will be run multiple times, each time with another data set. That is helpful when testing multiple exceptions or/and multiple exception's properties like class name, message, code because even though:

Once an exception is thrown the PHP can not return to the line of code that comes after the line that thrown the exception.

PHPUnit will run the test method multiple times, each time with different data set so instead of testing for example multiple exceptions in a single test method run (that will fail).

That's why we may make a test method responsible for testing just one exception at the time but run that test method multiple times with different input data and expected exception by using the PHPUnit's data provider.

Definition of the data provider method can be done by doing @dataProvider annotation to the test method that should be supplied by the data provider with a data set.

<?php

class ExceptionCheck
{
    public function throwE($data)
    {
        if ($data === 1) {
            throw new \RuntimeException;
        } else {
            throw new \InvalidArgumentException;
        }
    }
}

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function ExceptionTestProvider() : array
    {
        $data = [
            \RuntimeException::class =>
            [
                [
                    'input' => 1,
                    'className' => \RuntimeException::class
                ]
            ],

            \InvalidArgumentException::class =>
            [
                [
                    'input' => 2,
                    'className' => \InvalidArgumentException::class
                ]
            ]
        ];
        return $data;
    }

    /**
     * @dataProvider ExceptionTestProvider
     */
    public function testThrowException($data): void
    {
        $this->expectException($data['className']);
        $exceptionCheck = new ExceptionCheck;

        $exceptionCheck->throwE($data['input']);
    }
}

gives result:

 ✔ Throw exception with RuntimeException
 ✔ Throw exception with InvalidArgumentException

OK (2 tests, 2 assertions)

Note that even there is just a one test method in the entire ExceptionTest the output of the PHPUnit is:

OK (2 tests, 2 assertions)

So even the line:

$exceptionCheck->throwE($data['input']);

threw the exception at the first time that was no problem for testing another exception with the same test method because PHPUnit ran it again with different data set thanks to the data provider.

Each data set returned by the data provider can be named, you just need to use a string as a key under which a data set is stored. Therefore the expected exception class name is used twice. As a key of data set array and as a value (under 'className' key) that is later used as an argument for $this->expectException().

Using strings as key names for data sets makes that pretty and self explanatory summary:

✔ Throw exception with RuntimeException

✔ Throw exception with InvalidArgumentException

and if you change the line:

if ($data === 1) {

to:

if ($data !== 1) {

of the public function throwE($data)

to get wrong exceptions thrown and run the PHPUnit again you'll see:

 ✘ Throw exception with RuntimeException
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "InvalidArgumentException" matches expected exception "RuntimeException". Message was: "" at (...)

 ✘ Throw exception with InvalidArgumentException
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "RuntimeException" matches expected exception "InvalidArgumentException". Message was: "" at (...)

FAILURES!
Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 2.

as expected:

FAILURES! Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 2.

with exactly pointed out the data sets' names that caused some problems:

✘ Throw exception with RuntimeException

✘ Throw exception with InvalidArgumentException

Making public function throwE($data) not throwing any exceptions:

public function throwE($data)
{
}

and running PHPUnit again gives:

 ✘ Throw exception with RuntimeException
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "RuntimeException" is thrown.

 ✘ Throw exception with InvalidArgumentException
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "InvalidArgumentException" is thrown.

FAILURES!
Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 2.

It looks that using a data provider has several advantages:

  1. The Input data and/or expected data is separated from the actual test method.
  2. Every data set can have a descriptive name that clearly points out what data set caused test to pass or fail.
  3. In case of a test fail you get a proper failure message mentioning that an exception was not thrown or a wrong exception was thrown instead of an assertion that x is not y.
  4. There is only a single test method needed for testing a single method that may throw multiple exceptions.
  5. It is possible to test multiple exceptions and/or multiple exception's properties like class name, message, code.
  6. No need for any non-essential code like try catch block, instead just using the built in PHPUnit's feature.

Testing Exceptions Gotchas

exception of type "TypeError"

With PHP7 datatype support this test:

<?php
declare(strict_types=1);

class DatatypeChat
{
    public function say(string $msg)
    {
        if (!is_string($msg)) {
            throw new \InvalidArgumentException('Message must be a string');
        }
        return "Hello $msg";
    }
}

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testSay(): void
    {
        $this->expectException(\InvalidArgumentException::class);
        $chat = new DatatypeChat;
        $chat->say(array());
    }
}

fails with the output:

 ✘ Say
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "TypeError" matches expected exception "InvalidArgumentException". Message was: "Argument 1 passed to DatatypeChat::say() must be of the type string, array given (..)

FAILURES!
Tests: 1, Assertions: 1, Failures: 1.

even though there is in the method say:

if (!is_string($msg)) {
   throw new \InvalidArgumentException('Message must be a string');
}

and the test passes an array instead of a string:

$chat->say(array());

PHP does not reach the code:

throw new \InvalidArgumentException('Message must be a string');

because the exception is thrown earlier due to the type typing string:

public function say(string $msg)

therefore the TypeError is thrown instead of InvalidArgumentException

exception of type "TypeError" again

Knowing that we don't need if (!is_string($msg)) for checking data type because PHP already takes care about that if we specify the data type in the method declaration say(string $msg) we may want to throw InvalidArgumentException if the message is too long if (strlen($msg) > 3).

<?php
declare(strict_types=1);

class DatatypeChat
{
    public function say(string $msg)
    {
        if (strlen($msg) > 3) {
            throw new \InvalidArgumentException('Message is too long');
        }
        return "Hello $msg";
    }
}

class ExceptionTest extends \PHPUnit\Framework\TestCase
{
    public function testSayTooLong(): void
    {
        $this->expectException(\Exception::class);
        $chat = new DatatypeChat;
        $chat->say('I have more than 3 chars');
    }

    public function testSayDataType(): void
    {
        $this->expectException(\Exception::class);
        $chat = new DatatypeChat;
        $chat->say(array());
    }
}

Modifying also ExceptionTest so we have two cases (test methods) where an Exception should be thrown - first testSayTooLong when the message is too long and second testSayDataType when the message is a wrong type.

In both tests we expect instead of a specific exception class like InvalidArgumentException or TypeError just a generic Exception class by using

$this->expectException(\Exception::class);

the test result is:

 ✔ Say too long
 ✘ Say data type
   ├ Failed asserting that exception of type "TypeError" matches expected exception "Exception". Message was: "Argument 1 passed to DatatypeChat::say() must be of the type string, array given (..)

FAILURES!
Tests: 2, Assertions: 2, Failures: 1.

testSayTooLong() expecting a generic Exception and using

$this->expectException(\Exception::class);

passes with OK when the InvalidArgumentException is thrown

but

testSayDataType() using the same $this->expectException(\Exception::class); Fails with the description:

Failed asserting that exception of type "TypeError" matches expected exception "Exception".

It looks confusing that PHPUnit complained that exception TypeError was not an Exception, otherwise it would not have had any problem with $this->expectException(\Exception::class); inside the testSayDataType() as it did not have any problem with the testSayTooLong() throwing InvalidArgumentException and expecting: $this->expectException(\Exception::class);

The problem is that PHPUnit misleads you with the description as above because TypeError is not an exception. TypeError does not extends from the Exception class nor from any other its children.

TypeError implements Throwable interface see documentation

whereas

InvalidArgumentException extends LogicException documentation

and LogicException extends Exception documentation

thus InvalidArgumentException extends Exception as well.

That's why throwing the InvalidArgumentException passes test with OK and $this->expectException(\Exception::class); but throwing TypeError will not (it does not extend Exception)

However both Exception and TypeError implement Throwable interface.

Therefore changing in both tests

$this->expectException(\Exception::class);

to

$this->expectException(\Throwable::class);

makes test green:

 ✔ Say too long
 ✔ Say data type

OK (2 tests, 2 assertions)

See the list of Errors and Exception classes and how they are related to each other.

Just to be clear: it is a good practice to use a specific exception or error for unit test instead of a generic Exception or Throwable but if you ever encounter that misleading comment about exception now you will know why PHPUnit's exception TypeError or other exception Errors are not in fact Exceptions but Throwable

0

For PHPUnit 5.7.27 and PHP 5.6 and to test multiple exceptions in one test, it was important to force the exception testing. Using exception handling alone to assert the instance of Exception will skip testing the situation if no exception occurs.

public function testSomeFunction() {

    $e=null;
    $targetClassObj= new TargetClass();
    try {
        $targetClassObj->doSomething();
    } catch ( \Exception $e ) {
    }
    $this->assertInstanceOf(\Exception::class,$e);
    $this->assertEquals('Some message',$e->getMessage());

    $e=null;
    try {
        $targetClassObj->doSomethingElse();
    } catch ( Exception $e ) {
    }
    $this->assertInstanceOf(\Exception::class,$e);
    $this->assertEquals('Another message',$e->getMessage());

}
0
function yourfunction($a,$z){
   if($a<$z){ throw new <YOUR_EXCEPTION>; }
}

here is the test

class FunctionTest extends \PHPUnit_Framework_TestCase{

   public function testException(){

      $this->setExpectedException(<YOUR_EXCEPTION>::class);
      yourfunction(1,2);//add vars that cause the exception 

   }

}
0

PhpUnit is an amazing library, but this specific point is a bit frustrating. This is why we can use the turbotesting-php opensource library which has a very convenient assertion method to help us testing exceptions. It is found here:

https://github.com/edertone/TurboTesting/blob/master/TurboTesting-Php/src/main/php/utils/AssertUtils.php

And to use it, we would simply do the following:

AssertUtils::throwsException(function(){

    // Some code that must throw an exception here

}, '/expected error message/');

If the code we type inside the anonymous function does not throw an exception, an exception will be thrown.

If the code we type inside the anonymous function throws an exception, but its message does not match the expected regexp, an exception will also be thrown.

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