-1

I have the cd-hit output, I would like to obtain the number of sequences that belongs to a same cluster.

My input:

Cluster 1

0 33aa, >abu-miR-101a:1-8... *

Cluster 2

0 33aa, >abu-miR-103:1-8... * 1 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%

2 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%

3 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%

4 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%

Cluster 3

0 33aa, >abu-miR-10543:1-8... *

1 33aa, >abu-miR-10543:1-8... at 100.00%

Cluster 4

0 33aa, >abu-miR-10544:1-8... *

Cluster 5

0 33aa, >abu-miR-10545-5p:1-... *

I would like this output:

Cluster 1 1

Cluster 2 5

Cluster 3 2

Cluster 4 1

Cluster 5 1

I just want the name of cluster in a first column and the number of sequences that this cluster contains in a second column.

1

Would be good for you to show us what you've tried, and also I'm not sure how you got 5 sequences associated with Cluster 2 (there are only 4 in your output, but I notice that #1 is missing from the list, so maybe it's a copy / paste error?). But, one way to do it in Perl, since you've included that tag, is to read the file line by line, and if you see a 'Cluster' string make it a hash key, else (for subsequent lines), iterate the count like this:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use autodie;

my %results;
my $cluster;

while (<DATA>) {
    if ($_ =~ /Cluster/) {
        chomp($cluster = $_);
        $results{$cluster} = 0;
    } else {
        $results{$cluster}++;
    }
}

print "$_\t$results{$_}\n" for (sort { $a cmp $b } keys %results);

__DATA__
Cluster 1
0 33aa, >abu-miR-101a:1-8... *
Cluster 2
0 33aa, >abu-miR-103:1-8... * 1 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%
2 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%
3 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%
4 33aa, >NODE_603086_length_... at 100.00%
Cluster 3
0 33aa, >abu-miR-10543:1-8... *
1 33aa, >abu-miR-10543:1-8... at 100.00%
Cluster 4
0 33aa, >abu-miR-10544:1-8... *
Cluster 5
0 33aa, >abu-miR-10545-5p:1-... *

I've made a lot of assumptions here (for example, new Clusters will always start with a line containing the string "Cluster #" followed by subsequent lines containing sequences related to each "Cluster"). This is just a basic example of one quick way to think about it, and you'll likely have to tweak this to meet your final needs.

  • I'm not sure how you got 5 sequences associated with Cluster 2 Change $results{$cluster}++; to $results{$cluster} += tr/>// – Chris Charley Jul 1 at 21:44
  • Perfect! It works! – Jordana Oliveira Jul 2 at 19:32
0

Perfect! It works! I just add a sort to obtain the results sorted by numbers. Like this:

perl count-cluster.pl | sort -k 2 -g | head

Then the head result:

Cluster 0 64

Cluster 1 1

Cluster 2 5

Cluster 3 2

Cluster 4 1

Cluster 5 1

Cluster 6 1

Cluster 7 3

Cluster 8 1

Cluster 9 1

Thank you so much! There are more than 3000 lines in my files, and I need this results for three differents conditions, that helps a lot! Thank you!

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