10

Here is my dataframe:

            Dec-18  Jan-19  Feb-19  Mar-19  Apr-19  May-19
Saturday    2540.0  2441.0  3832.0  4093.0  1455.0  2552.0
Sunday      1313.0  1891.0  2968.0  2260.0  1454.0  1798.0
Monday      1360.0  1558.0  2967.0  2156.0  1564.0  1752.0
Tuesday     1089.0  2105.0  2476.0  1577.0  1744.0  1457.0
Wednesday   1329.0  1658.0  2073.0  2403.0  1231.0  874.0
Thursday    798.0   1195.0  2183.0  1287.0  1460.0  1269.0

I have tried some pandas ops but I am not able to do that.

This is what I want to do:

             items
Saturday    2540.0  
Sunday      1313.0  
Monday      1360.0  
Tuesday     1089.0  
Wednesday   1329.0  
Thursday    798.0   
Saturday    2441.0  
Sunday      1891.0  
Monday      1558.0  
Tuesday     2105.0  
Wednesday   1658.0  
Thursday    1195.0   ............ and so on 

I want to set those rows into rows in downside, how to do that?

9
df.reset_index().melt(id_vars='index').drop('variable',1)

Output:

       index   value
0    Saturday  2540.0
1      Sunday  1313.0
2      Monday  1360.0
3     Tuesday  1089.0
4   Wednesday  1329.0
5    Thursday   798.0
6    Saturday  2441.0
7      Sunday  1891.0
8      Monday  1558.0
9     Tuesday  2105.0
10  Wednesday  1658.0
11   Thursday  1195.0
12   Saturday  3832.0
13     Sunday  2968.0
14     Monday  2967.0
15    Tuesday  2476.0
16  Wednesday  2073.0
17   Thursday  2183.0
18   Saturday  4093.0
19     Sunday  2260.0
20     Monday  2156.0
21    Tuesday  1577.0
22  Wednesday  2403.0
23   Thursday  1287.0
24   Saturday  1455.0
25     Sunday  1454.0
26     Monday  1564.0
27    Tuesday  1744.0
28  Wednesday  1231.0
29   Thursday  1460.0
30   Saturday  2552.0
31     Sunday  1798.0
32     Monday  1752.0
33    Tuesday  1457.0
34  Wednesday   874.0
35   Thursday  1269.0

Note: just noted a commented suggesting to do the same thing, I will delete my post if requested :)

  • Comments are usually "2nd class citizens" and do not constitute an answer. You can give credits for "the initial idea" by copying the comment and linking to the user, if applicable (doesn't seem the case). Otherwise, just enjoy the upvotes. – Ismael Miguel Jul 2 at 8:51
  • 1
    @IsmaelMiguel agree, but there's a certain level of pettiness around and I'm just trying to avoid that. I'm here to help more than anything so I won't argue with a stranger about credits :) – Yuca Jul 2 at 11:54
  • I haven't seen that level of pettiness. I've seen answers being implementer based on my comments (or, a few times, with a copy-paste of my comment). I know fully well that I should have answered instead. I guess I am lucky for not being petty about it? – Ismael Miguel Jul 2 at 13:46
8

Create it with numpy by reshaping the data.

import pandas as pd
import numpy as np

pd.DataFrame(df.to_numpy().flatten('F'), 
             index=np.tile(df.index, df.shape[1]), 
             columns=['items'])

Output:

            items
Saturday   2540.0
Sunday     1313.0
Monday     1360.0
Tuesday    1089.0
Wednesday  1329.0
Thursday    798.0
Saturday   2441.0
...
Sunday     1798.0
Monday     1752.0
Tuesday    1457.0
Wednesday   874.0
Thursday   1269.0
  • 1
    My answer was virtually identical to this. a = df.to_numpy(); pd.DataFrame(np.reshape(a, (-1, 1), 'F'), np.resize(df.index, a.size), ['items']) – piRSquared Jul 1 at 20:34
  • @piRSquared my answer was faster than the accepted answer and matches the output requested exactly, while the accepted answer does not. Mine was also first posted. Sometimes things just don't make sense do they :P. – d_kennetz Jul 1 at 21:34
  • 2
    Minor fix: the argument to np.tile should be df.shape[1] instead of df.shape[0], which only happens to work on this example data because it is square! – Peter Leimbigler Jul 2 at 1:58
4

You can do:

df = df.stack().sort_index(level=1).reset_index(level = 1, drop=True).to_frame('items')

It is interesting that this method got overlooked even though it is the fastest:

import time
start = time.time()
df.stack().sort_index(level=1).reset_index(level = 1, drop=True).to_frame('items')
end = time.time()
print("time taken {}".format(end-start))

yields: time taken 0.006181955337524414

while this:

start = time.time()
df.reset_index().melt(id_vars='days').drop('variable',1)
end = time.time()
print("time taken {}".format(end-start))

yields: time taken 0.010072708129882812

Any my output format matches OP's requested exactly.

  • Interesting: why does this work? I would expect df.stack().sort_index(level=1) to lexicographically sort the strings Dec-18, Jan-19, etc., but in fact they get sorted in date order, even if they're strings and not datetime objects. df.stack().index.get_level_values(1).sort_values() lexsorts. – Peter Leimbigler Jul 1 at 20:41
  • @PeterLeimbigler it is sorting based on the order of the columns, not datetime or string. If jan-19 was the first column that would've been sorted first. try it using this setup: df = pd.DataFrame({'days': ['Saturday', 'Sunday', 'Monday', 'Tuesday', 'Wednesday', 'Thursday'], 'Dec-18': [400,300,200,100,1000,1200], 'Jan-19': [500, 300, 200, 800, 900, 1000]}) then: df = df.set_index('days') then: df.stack().sort_index(level=1) Then go back and change the order of the columns and see what appears first. – d_kennetz Jul 1 at 21:26
  • Thanks for the explanation! This is unexpected behaviour to me. From my testing, it appears that if you stack a DataFrame's columns into a MultiIndex and the result is a Series, then the index remembers the order of the columns, and sorts according to that order. But if the .stack() returns a DataFrame (or if you convert to DataFrame using .stack().to_frame()), the index no longer remembers the order of the original columns. – Peter Leimbigler Jul 1 at 21:42
  • 2
    @d_kennetz sometimes they do not. I usually think of answers as general ideas. I judge them accordingly. I give credit for ingenuity and presentation/explanation. I like to see the output from proposed solutions because all to often answers provide a solution that doesn't produce correct output. This doesn't show the results. Also, most of the time, DataFrames aren't big enough for performance to matter. OP goes with what is most understandable to them. Keep up the good fight and answer questions that are beneficial long term. (-: – piRSquared Jul 1 at 21:45
  • Also, use df.unstack().reset_index(0, drop=True).to_frame('items'). By unstack-ing rather than stack-ing, you save yourself from the sorting shenanigans. – piRSquared Jul 1 at 21:51

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