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I'm still confused by the rules invented to support moving and forwarding. One thing I'm still not sure about is:

Is a forwarding reference just an rvalue reference (with reference collapsing rules applied)?

If it is an rvalue reference, then why does the function:

template<typename T>
void func(T&&);

accept not only rvalues, but also lvalues?

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I'm not sure if this answer will satisfy you, but I can point out the relevant parts of the standard. In a nutshell, the reference T&& is "grammatically" always an rvalue reference, but sometimes the type it ends up declaring is an lvalue reference type.

When this happens as the result of template argument deduction, the entire construct is called "forwarding reference", as a convenient shorthand. (This circumstance requires reference collapsing, but template argument deduction is not the only time reference collapsing happens.)

Now, on to the standard wording. First we have [dcl.ref] (e.g. p2, p6):

A reference type that is declared using & is called an lvalue reference, and a reference type that is declared using && is called an rvalue reference. [...]

If a typedef-name (9.1.3, 13.1) or a decltype-specifier (9.1.7.2) denotes a type TR that is a reference to a type T, an attempt to create the type “lvalue reference to cv TR” creates the type “lvalue reference to T”, while an attempt to create the type “rvalue reference to cv TR” creates the type TR. [Note: This rule is known as reference collapsing. — end note]

Finally, the case of template argument deduction is handled in [temp.deduct.call]p3:

A forwarding reference is an rvalue reference to a cv-unqualified template parameter [...]

In other words, a forwarding reference is an rvalue reference, but it's one that accepts lvalues, too. (Note that the standard's definition of "forwarding reference" doesn't actually require the template argument to be deduced, although that is the primary way in which you would usually want to trigger the reference collapsing behaviour.)

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  • I would include the sentence after the definition of "forwarding reference", which is the remaining key piece, in a sense the opposite of reference collapsing, to make forwarding reference deduction actually work. Though it does presume knowing what P and A are in the section's context.
    – aschepler
    Jul 1 '19 at 21:49
  • @aschepler: maybe, though the question wasn't really how forwarding works, but rather about the terminology that's used for the various constructs in question, which I believe are covered by the above.
    – Kerrek SB
    Jul 1 '19 at 21:51
  • @Kerrek SB Thank you very much! But... "a forwarding reference is an rvalue reference, but it's one that accepts lvalues, too." It sounds weird... How can it be? Jul 2 '19 at 19:55
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Before T is substituted, T && is an rvalue reference (obviously).

After T is substituted (and after references are collapsed), T && either remains an rvalue reference (if T is not a reference), or becomes an lvalue reference (if T is an lvalue reference).

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  • ITYM "Before T is substituted, T&& is an rvalue reference." T itself would often be a non-reference type, e.g. if the expression is a non-string non-function literal or calls a function returning a non-reference type.
    – aschepler
    Jul 1 '19 at 21:54
  • @aschepler Indeed, by "it" I meant T &&. Edited for clarity. Jul 1 '19 at 21:55
  • "if T is not a reference"? No, "if T is not an lvalue reference"! Jul 2 '19 at 1:20
  • @Deduplicator T would never be deduced as an rvalue reference if T && is a forwarding reference. Jul 2 '19 at 8:18
  • @HolyBlackCat See it for yourself. Reference-collapsing collapses && && and && to &&, none to none, and everything else to &. Jul 2 '19 at 8:21

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