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I am building a WebApi service using OWIN self-hosting (runnable in either console mode or as a Windows service - final deployment to be a service, console mode is for debugging/development). I am having problems with per-request lifetime for Unity injection.

I have previously built other services deployed as IIS WebApi; I added the Unity Mvc nuget along with the basic Unity nuget, follow the directions, and it all works.

In the OWIN self-host environment, I have no problem with default type registrations and ContainerControlledLifetimeManager registrations, but I can't get PerRequestLifetimeManager to work. For one thing, UnityMvcActivator doesn't start automatically under OWIN self-host as it does for IIS. If I explicitly call UnityMvcActivator.Start when I do, a resolution attempt for type registered with PerRequestLifetimeManager results in an InvalidOperationException with the following message:

The PerRequestLifetimeManager can only be used in the context of an HTTP request.Possible causes for this error are using the lifetime manager on a non-ASP.NET application, or using it in a thread that is not associated with the appropriate synchronization context.

Can PerRequestLifetimeManager work with OWIN self-host, or is it dependent on IIS? If it will work under OWIN self-host, how do I get UnityMvcActivator to start properly and my injected types registered? If PerRequestLifetimeManager is not compatible with OWIN self-host, how else can I register types with per-request lifetimes?

Portion of UnityConfig:

    public static void RegisterTypes(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        // NOTE: To load from web.config uncomment the line below.
        // Make sure to add a Unity.Configuration to the using statements.
        // container.LoadConfiguration();

        // TODO: Register your type's mappings here.
        // container.RegisterType<IProductRepository, ProductRepository>();

        // My test registration:
        container.RegisterType<ITestService, TestService>(new PerRequestLifetimeManager());
    }

UnityMvcActivator (as provided in the NuGet, except for the one un-commented line):

[assembly: WebActivatorEx.PreApplicationStartMethod(typeof(Accounting.Service.UnityMvcActivator), nameof(Accounting.Service.UnityMvcActivator.Start))]
[assembly: WebActivatorEx.ApplicationShutdownMethod(typeof(Accounting.Service.UnityMvcActivator), nameof(Accounting.Service.UnityMvcActivator.Shutdown))]

namespace Accounting.Service
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Provides the bootstrapping for integrating Unity with ASP.NET MVC.
    /// </summary>
    public static class UnityMvcActivator
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Integrates Unity when the application starts.
        /// </summary>
        public static void Start() 
        {
            var container = UnityConfig.Container;

            FilterProviders.Providers.Remove(FilterProviders.Providers.OfType<FilterAttributeFilterProvider>().First());
            FilterProviders.Providers.Add(new UnityFilterAttributeFilterProvider(container));

            DependencyResolver.SetResolver(new UnityDependencyResolver(container));

            // TODO: Uncomment if you want to use PerRequestLifetimeManager
            Microsoft.Web.Infrastructure.DynamicModuleHelper.DynamicModuleUtility.RegisterModule(typeof(UnityPerRequestHttpModule));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Disposes the Unity container when the application is shut down.
        /// </summary>
        public static void Shutdown()
        {
            UnityConfig.Container.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

EDIT

It seems that the MVC PerRequestLifetimeManager won't work in the context I am trying to use it, but I have devised what I think is a work-around using OWIN middleware as follows:

public class PerRequestMiddleware : OwinMiddleware
{
    [ThreadStatic] static Dictionary<Type, object> _instances;

    public PerRequestMiddleware(OwinMiddleware next) : base(next)
    {
    }

    public override async Task Invoke(IOwinContext context)
    {
        _instances = null;

        await Next.Invoke(context);

        if (_instances != null)
        {
            foreach (var disposable in _instances.Values.OfType<IDisposable>())
            {
                disposable.Dispose();
            }
        }
    }

    public static T GetInstance<T>(Func<T> constructor)
    {
        if (_instances == null)
        {
            _instances = new Dictionary<Type, object>();
        }

        var type = typeof(T);

        if (!_instances.TryGetValue(type, out var instance))
        {
            instance = constructor();
            _instances[type] = instance;
        }

        return (T)instance;
    }
}

Instead of registering by type, I register factories like this:

public static class UnityConfig
{
    #region Unity Container
    private static Lazy<IUnityContainer> container =
      new Lazy<IUnityContainer>(() =>
      {
          var container = new UnityContainer();
          RegisterTypes(container);
          return container;
      });

    /// <summary>
    /// Configured Unity Container.
    /// </summary>
    public static IUnityContainer Container => container.Value;
    #endregion

    /// <summary>
    /// Registers the type mappings with the Unity container.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="container">The unity container to configure.</param>
    /// <remarks>
    /// There is no need to register concrete types such as controllers or
    /// API controllers (unless you want to change the defaults), as Unity
    /// allows resolving a concrete type even if it was not previously
    /// registered.
    /// </remarks>
    public static void RegisterTypes(IUnityContainer container)
    {
        // NOTE: To load from web.config uncomment the line below.
        // Make sure to add a Unity.Configuration to the using statements.
        // container.LoadConfiguration();

        // TODO: Register your type's mappings here.
        // container.RegisterType<IProductRepository, ProductRepository>();

        container.RegisterFactory<ITestService>(c => PerRequestMiddleware.GetInstance(() => new TestService()));
    }
}

My question now is: does my work-around contain any flaws or weaknesses?

0

A little late to the party but after spending hours looking for a good solution I found this blogpost: https://codingsight.com/using-single-ioc-container-http-request-web-api-vs-owin-middleware/

The idea is the same for WebApi and MVC where a Owin Middleware creates the "Scoped Container" or "Child Container" and dependency resolution in ie. MVC is done using this scoped container from the OwinContext.

-2

The code you provided resolves the issue in the OwinPerRequestUnityMiddleware project on Github here.

However, one thing I noticed when using this code is that IDisposable objects get disposed before custom OData serializer providers finish creating resources.

If you need an object even after the lifetime of the OWIN pipeline, you can use a Factory class in the container.

For example, instead of using a DbContext, use IDbContextFactory<MyDbContext>.

0

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