1

I can't figure out how to get the JSON string from the HttpModule's get() function. I am using this API endpoint as my target: https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1

As you can see this endpoint returns a JSON string. I can't figure out how to get this JSON string within my Angular code. I keep getting things like Observable or some other garbage.

export class LicenseService {

  users: any;

  constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

  public getUsers(): void {
    const data = this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').subscribe(res => this.users = JSON.stringify(res));
    console.log(this.users);
  }
}

I have also tried this, which doesn't work.

public getUsers(): void {
    const data = this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1');

    data.subscribe({
      next(response) {
        this.users = response;
        },
      error(err) { console.error('Error: ' + err); },
      complete() { console.log('Completed'); }
    });

    console.log(this.users);
  }

I thought I was supposed to use .subscribe to do this but every time I try and use the next function within subscribe I don't get what I want back.

All I want to do is be able to access the JSON that is returned by the endpoint, how do I do this.

3

I already made another answer but here is a better working one using rxjs as it should be used.

Service: license.service.ts

export class LicenseService {

  constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

  getUsers() {
    return this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').pipe(map(res=> res.data));
  }
}

Component: license.component.ts

@Component({
  selector: 'app-license',
  templateUrl: './license.component.html',
})
export class LicenseComponent {

  constructor(private licenseService: LicenseService) { }
  users$ = this.licenseService.getUsers();

}

Template: license.component.html

<div *ngFor="let user of users$ | async">
  {{user.first_name}} {{user.last_name}}
</div>
| improve this answer | |
  • @Jake12342134 if this answer fits your need, could you accept it? – Matt Walterspieler Aug 27 '19 at 8:38
1

The second approach is close.

This code does not work because you are mixing asynchronous with synchronous. console.log(this.users) gets executed before the call to the backend is completed.

Try this:

public getUsers(): void {
    this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').subscribe(res => {
        this.users = res;
        console.log(res);
    });
}

[EDIT]:

If you want to return the data, you would have to do something someone else suggested - transform this to async function.

But here, you probably should not do that. The thing with RxJS is that once you go Rx, you should stay Rx. You should try to work on observables using the observable.pipe() and various operators like map(), filter(), every(), count() etc. (more can be found in documentation - here.

At the end of the chain of different methods working on these observables you should have single call to the subscribe. This way, you will be working with observbables almost as you would work with synchronous code and won't need to worry about things like that from your question.

| improve this answer | |
  • Okay but how can I access the data array that's held inside the response from the API? – Jake12342134 Jul 2 '19 at 13:10
0

What you can do is use the async function and toPromise method to transform your observable to a promise.

export class LicenseService {

  users: any;

  constructor(private http: HttpClient) { }

  async getUsers() {
    this.users = await this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').toPromise();
    console.log(this.users);
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    While that's possible (so IMHO not worth a downvote :) it's still extremely unidiomatic. It will lead OP to architect synchronously from the Service up to the Component, and then things will start breaking when other async things happen. Better to implement observable the way it was intended. The whole point of RxJS is to build reactively. – msanford Jul 2 '19 at 13:22
  • I totally agree with you but the thing is that the person who asked the question doesn't seem to understand the rxjs concept very well yet. Here I give him an answer that works now. The best way would be to use an async pipe in the template. – Matt Walterspieler Jul 2 '19 at 13:28
  • 1
    Matt, part of my comment was directed at OP and future readers ;) No worries. – msanford Jul 2 '19 at 13:47
  • 1
    You're right, I wrote another better full answer ;) – Matt Walterspieler Jul 2 '19 at 13:53
0

I think you need to get data from the LicenseService to a component. While toPromise() is an option. You can also use map operator. I have created an example. Here is the link

https://stackblitz.com/edit/angular-api-call

| improve this answer | |
  • Okay but logging it to the console is useless, how can I return it to another method so I can actually make use of the returned json? – Jake12342134 Jul 2 '19 at 13:34
  • @Jake12342134 Stick <pre>{{users | json}}</pre> into the html template to see this directly or just use this.users in your other methods – Andrew Allen Jul 2 '19 at 13:40
0

You very clearly aren't understanding how asynchronous methods interact with the rest of your synchronous code. I'll break down your first code for you.

//call the http service and use it to perform an HTTP GET.
//This is an asynchrounous call, meaning it out does not lock the rest of the application.
//The HTTP GET call starts, then the rest of your code runs.
const data = this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1')

//At this point, the HTTP GET has started, but since it is async, we do not wait for it to finish.
//So we log users. Users is CURRENTLY undefined (since our call hasn't finished yet.
console.log(this.users);

//After some (indeterminate) quantity of time, our HTTP GET finishes it's call.
//Now that it has finished its call, we perform the callback within the subscription.
//The subscription is an observable because it emits an event when it is finished.
//In our callback, we set the value of users.
.subscribe(res => this.users = JSON.stringify(res));

As others have mentioned, there are a few ways to solve the problem. You can either use async/await (which is an ES8 feature) to delay the console log of users until your HTTP GET finishes it's call. This is the same code that @Mateusz provided. This is not the correct way to handle the situation, but async/await is a JS feature that you should understand.

async getUsers() {
   this.users = await this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').toPromise();
   console.log(this.users);
}

Alternatively, you can restructure your code to utilize the user data while within the callback of the observable. This is probably the better way to handle the situation. You will need to redesign your code so that it can handle the result of the async call as it comes down from the server. Simply putting your log into the callback solves the current problem, but you'll need to think about other scenarios, especially how you are using the user data.

this.http.get('https://reqres.in/api/users?page=1').subscribe(res => {
   this.users = JSON.stringify(res);
   console.log(this.users);
});
| improve this answer | |
  • Okay this is all well and good, but how do I even make use of the JSON that is being returned by the API call. If I do res => { return res } then I get some weird object that is not a JSON object. I understand how async code works, what I don't understand is how to actually get access to the JSON being returned by the API. All I want to do is get the JSON and then deserialise it into some kind of object so it can be used. – Jake12342134 Jul 2 '19 at 13:38
  • You do use the json. You use it in the subscription callback. Since its an async function, you have to wait for it to finish to do stuff with its result. That's the point of the .subscribe – Rich Jul 2 '19 at 13:51
  • So how do I get the my JSON out of the callback and into synchronous variable I can use elsewhere? – Jake12342134 Jul 2 '19 at 13:53

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