12

I have a header view which extends its background to be under the status bar using edgesIgnoringSafeArea. To align the content/subviews of the header view correctly, I need the safeAreaInsets from GeometryReader. However, when using GeometryReader, my view doesn't have a fitted size anymore.

Code without using GeometryReader

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        VStack(alignment: .leading) {
            CustomView()
        }
        .padding(.horizontal)
        .padding(.bottom, 64)
        .background(Color.blue)
    }
}

Preview

Expected

Code using GeometryReader

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            VStack(alignment: .leading) {
                CustomView()
            }
            .padding(.horizontal)
            .padding(.top, geometry.safeAreaInsets.top)
            .padding(.bottom, 64)
            .background(Color.blue)
            .fixedSize()
        }
    }
}

Preview

enter image description here

Is there a way to use GeometryReader without modifying the underlying view size?

3
  • Both your examples yield the same result to me. Could you post your CustomView? And also, by your screenshot I think you are using Xcode Previews. Are you? They aren't very reliable at the moment. – kontiki Jul 2 '19 at 20:11
  • It's just a VStack with an embedded HStack. I checked both Xcode preview and simulator. Same result. Try this in your preview provider MyView().previewLayout(.sizeThatFits) – Infinity Jul 2 '19 at 20:37
  • 1
    I’m updating to beta 3 and my computer is unavailable. I’ll try later and let you know.. – kontiki Jul 2 '19 at 20:47
5

I tried with the previewLayout and I see what you mean. However, I think the behavior is as expected. The definition of .sizeThatFits is:

Fit the container (A) to the size of the preview (B) when offered the size of the device (C) on which the preview is running.

I intercalated some letters to define each part and make it more clear:

A = the final size of the preview.

B = The size of what you are modifying with .previewLayout(). In the first case, it's the VStack. But in the second case, it's the GeometryReader.

C = The size of the screen of the device.

Both views act differently, because VStack is not greedy, and only takes what it needs. GeometryReader, on the other side, tries to have it all, because it does not know what its child will want to use. If the child wants to use less, it can do it, but it has to start by being offered everything.

Perhaps if you edit your question to explain exactly what you would like to accomplish, I can refine my answer a little.

If you would like GeometryReader to report the size of the VStack. you may do so by putting it inside a .background modifier. But again, I am not sure what's the goal, so maybe that's a no go.

I have written an article about the different uses of GeometryReader. Here's the link, in case it helps: https://swiftui-lab.com/geometryreader-to-the-rescue/


UPDATE

Ok, with your additional explanation, here you have a working solution. Note that the Preview will not work, because safeInsets are reported as zero. On the simulator, however, it works fine:

As you will see, I use view preferences. They are not explained anywhere, but I am currently writing an article about them that I will post soon.

It may all look too verbose, but if you find yourself using it too often, you can encapsulate it inside a custom modifier.

enter image description here

import SwiftUI

struct InsetPreferenceKey: PreferenceKey {
    static var defaultValue: CGFloat = 0

    static func reduce(value: inout CGFloat, nextValue: () -> CGFloat) {
        value = nextValue()
    }

    typealias Value = CGFloat
}

struct InsetGetter: View {
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geometry in
            return Rectangle().preference(key: InsetPreferenceKey.self, value: geometry.safeAreaInsets.top)
        }
    }
}

struct ContentView : View {
    var body: some View {
        MyView()

    }
}

struct MyView : View {
    @State private var topInset: CGFloat = 0

    var body: some View {

        VStack {
            CustomView(inset: topInset)
                .padding(.horizontal)
                .padding(.bottom, 64)
                .padding(.top, topInset)
                .background(Color.blue)
                .background(InsetGetter())
                .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
                .onPreferenceChange(InsetPreferenceKey.self) { self.topInset = $0 }

            Spacer()
        }

    }
}

struct CustomView: View {
    let inset: CGFloat

    var body: some View {
        VStack {
            HStack {
                Text("C \(inset)").color(.white).fontWeight(.bold).font(.title)
                Spacer()
            }

            HStack {
                Text("A").color(.white)
                Text("B").color(.white)
                Spacer()
            }
        }

    }
}
7
  • "VStack is not greedy" this is a very interesting subject, it certainly seems like different views are either greedy or not, but can we control that? Can we even control it when we make our own views? I haven't been able to find any documentation on this at all, which is strange, it's pretty fundamental. – Gusutafu Jul 2 '19 at 22:58
  • I am trying to get the safeAreaInset in order to add appropriate padding to my text. The idea is to have MyView background to be under the status bar then use the safeAreaInset to offset the text appropriately – Infinity Jul 2 '19 at 23:14
  • @Gusutafu Yes, you can control how much space of what you are given you want to use. And you can even exceed it. Mostly by using .frame() and .fixedSize(). If you want to discuss it further, either send me an email or post a new question, so we don't hijack this one. – kontiki Jul 3 '19 at 0:05
  • 2
    Awesome, that works. However, it seems to be such a convoluted way of solving such a simple problem. – Infinity Jul 3 '19 at 1:54
  • Updated the answer once more. It turns out your original idea did work. We just got distracted by the problem with the preview. – kontiki Jul 3 '19 at 4:43
3

I managed to solve this by wrapping the page main view inside a GeometryReader and pass down the safeAreaInsets to MyView. Since it is the main page view where we want the entire screen thus it is ok to be as greedy as possible.

1

Answer to the question in the title:

  • It is possible to wrap the GeometryReader in an .overlay() or .background(). Doing so will mitigate the layout changing effect of GeometryReader. The view will be laid out as normal, the GeometryReader will expand to the full size of the view and emit the geometry into its content builder closure.
  • It's also possible to set the frame of the GeometryReader to stop its eagerness in expanding.

For example, this example renders a blue rectangle, and a "Hello world" text inside at 3/4th the height of the rectangle (instead of the rectangle filling up all available space) by wrapping the GeometryReader in an overlay:

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        Rectangle()
            .fill(Color.blue)
            .frame(height: 150)
            .overlay(GeometryReader { geo in
                Text("Hello world").padding(.top, geo.size.height * 3 / 4)
            })
        Spacer()
    }
}

Another example to achieve the same effect by setting the frame on the GeometryReader:

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        GeometryReader { geo in
            Rectangle().fill(Color.blue)
            Text("Hello world").padding(.top, geo.size.height * 3 / 4)
        }
        .frame(height: 150)

        Spacer()
    }
}

Render with "Hello world" on 3/4th the height of a blue rectangle.

However, there are caveats / not very obvious behaviors

1

View modifiers apply to anything up to the point that they are applied, and not to anything after. An overlay / background that is added after .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all) will respect the safe area (not participate in ignoring the safe area).

This code renders "Hello world" inside the safe area, while the blue rectangle ignores the safe area:

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        Rectangle()
            .fill(Color.blue)
            .frame(height: 150)
            .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            .overlay(VStack {
                        Text("Hello world")
                        Spacer()
            })

        Spacer()
    }
}

Render of "Hello world" inside the safe area.

2

Applying .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all) to the background makes GeometryReader ignore the SafeArea:

struct MyView : View {
    var body: some View {
        Rectangle()
            .fill(Color.blue)
            .frame(height: 150)
            .overlay(GeometryReader { geo in
                VStack {
                        Text("Hello world")
                            // No effect, safe area is set to be ignored.
                            .padding(.top, geo.safeAreaInsets.top)
                        Spacer()
                }
            })
            .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)

        Spacer()
    }
}

Render of "Hello world" ignoring the safe area.

It is possible to compose many layouts by adding multiple overlays / backgrounds.

3

A measured geometry will be available to the content of the GeometryReader. Not to parent or sibling views; even if the values are extracted into a State or ObservableObject. SwiftUI will emit a runtime warning if that happens:

struct MyView : View {
    @State private var safeAreaInsets = EdgeInsets()

    var body: some View {
        Text("Hello world")
            .edgesIgnoringSafeArea(.all)
            .background(GeometryReader(content: set(geometry:)))
            .padding(.top, safeAreaInsets.top)
        Spacer()
    }

    private func set(geometry: GeometryProxy) -> some View {
        self.safeAreaInsets = geometry.safeAreaInsets
        return Color.blue
    }
}

Runtime warning "Modifying state during view update, this will cause undefined behavior."

-3

Depending on your view and use case it may be also feasable to define a fixed preview size using PreviewLayout.fixed(width:height:).

struct MyView_Previews: PreviewProvider {
    static var previews: some View {
        MyView().previewLayout(.fixed(width: 400, height: 150))
    }
}

The only downside is probably, that this won‘t scale dynamically. But still better than full device previews, especially when using multiple previews.

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