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I have a 100 million row csv that I have to read in chunks with pandas like this:

df_chunks = pandas.read_csv(
    'my-file.csv.gz',
    sep='\t',
    chunksize=100000,
    compression='gzip')

for df in df_chunks:
    # here I filter some rows and columns and after that
    # I write to a new csv
    filtered_df.to_csv(
        'my_filtered.csv.gz',
        sep=',',
        columns=['id', 'date'],
        compression='gzip',
        mode='a')

The data I am trying to write looks like this, is only 2 columns

id,date
42517544,2019-06-30
42517544,2019-06-30
42517544,2019-07-01
...

Now I can use something like df.drop_duplicates() but since I am writing in chunks I could end up eventually with duplicates. Notice the file is big, around 10G, so I need to read and write in chunks.

I would like to find a way to do it with pandas and perhaps a set in memory that doesn't consume too much memory because that is a constraint as well.

What is a good approach for this ?

  • If you only need 2 columns from the CSV (instead of the large number of columns), then you could specify the usecols = ['id', 'date'] parameter in your pd.read_csv section. If your CSV file only contains id and date this won't help. – HS-nebula Jul 3 '19 at 13:24
  • @HS-nebula: Actually I do that for writing but when reading I need to filter on most of the other columns, will update the question though, thanks. – PepperoniPizza Jul 3 '19 at 13:25
  • Maybe you could use a database to do this for you? A sqlite file instead of a csv? – Dan Jul 3 '19 at 13:27
  • @piRSquared: it could be anything really, it's a string and it could be empty or a non-date field like 'a123121' – PepperoniPizza Jul 3 '19 at 13:27
  • 2
    I think your options are: (1) do it in RedShift using SQL (2) keep a running set and use that to filter, i.e. a hash table (3) if you can't keep unique hashes in memory and you can tolerate some error maybe a bloom filter will help you, (4) re-read the output file in chunks for each chunk of your input - this will be O(n^2) nd have a lot of I/O overhead. I think option (1) seems like your best bet. – Dan Jul 3 '19 at 13:36
1

Setup

1 Million Rows

np.random.seed([3, 1415])
n = 1_000_000
dfout = pd.DataFrame({
    'id': np.random.randint(1000, size=n),
    'date': np.random.choice(pd.date_range('2019-01-01', periods=1000), size=n)
})

dfout.to_csv('my-file.csv.gz', compression='gzip', sep='\t', index=False)

Solution

Chunk as you did

df_chunks = pd.read_csv(
    'my-file.csv.gz',
    sep='\t',
    chunksize=100000,
    compression='gzip')

Write individual files per unique date

for i, df in enumerate(df_chunks):
    for date, d in df.groupby('date'):
        date = pd.Timestamp(date)
        d.drop_duplicates().to_csv(
            f'{date:%Y%m%d}.csv.gz',
            compression='gzip',
            mode='a',
            index=False,
            header=False
        )
    print(f'\r{i}', end='')

Read in each individual date file, drop_duplicates, and write back out

from pathlib import Path

path = Path('.')

for i, fh in enumerate(path.glob('[0-9]' * 8 + '.csv.gz')):
    df = pd.read_csv(fh, header=None)
    df.drop_duplicates().to_csv(
        'my_filtered.csv.gz',
        compression='gzip',
        mode='a',
        index=False,
        header=False
    )
    print(f'\r{i}: {fh}', end='')

df = pd.read_csv(
    'my_filtered.csv.gz',
    compression='gzip',
    header=None,
    names=['id', 'date']
)

Validation

assert len(df) == len(dfout) - dfout.duplicated().sum()
assert df.duplicated().sum() == 0
| improve this answer | |
  • very detailed approach, this is indeed a top solution, will try it out, thanks ! – PepperoniPizza Jul 4 '19 at 2:56

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