4

I'm writing a background service using .net's HostBuilder. I have class called MyService that implements BackgroundService ExecuteAsync method and i encountered some weird behavior there. Inside the method i await a certain task and any exception thrown after the await is swallowed but an exception that is thrown before the await terminates the process.

I looked online in all sorts of forums (stack overflow, msdn, medium) but I could not find an explanation for this behavior.

public class MyService : BackgroundService
    {
        protected override async Task ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken)
        {
            await Task.Delay(500, stoppingToken);
            throw new Exception("oy vey"); // this exception will be swallowed
        }
    }

public class MyService : BackgroundService
    {
        protected override async Task ExecuteAsync(CancellationToken stoppingToken)
        {
            throw new Exception("oy vey"); // this exception will terminate the process
            await Task.Delay(500, stoppingToken);
        }
    }

I expect both exception to terminate the process

  • That's interesting but I'm curious about why would that behave this way. – TheDotFestClub Jul 3 '19 at 13:25
  • Please see this answer by casperOne, explains a few ways to handle exceptions by tasks... – Çöđěxěŕ Jul 3 '19 at 13:25
  • 1
    Are you sure it is? Who calls ExecuteAsync ? – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 13:31
  • 1
    @JessedeWit this isn't about the GC though. This is a BackgroundService which means it's probably alive as long as the application is – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 13:34
  • 1
    @JessedeWit it's not about that either. It's really about how those methods are called. Yes, in the end it's about the GC but only because the Hosting infrastructure works they way it does. – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 13:50
12

TL;DR;

Don't let exceptions get out of ExecuteAsync. Handle them, hide them or request an application shutdown explicitly.

Don't wait too long before starting the first asynchronous operation in there either

Explanation

This has little to do with await itself. Exceptions thrown after it will bubble up to the caller. It's the caller that handles them, or not.

ExecuteAsync is a method called by BackgroundService which means any exception raised by the method will be handled by BackgroundService. That code is :

    public virtual Task StartAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        // Store the task we're executing
        _executingTask = ExecuteAsync(_stoppingCts.Token);

        // If the task is completed then return it, this will bubble cancellation and failure to the caller
        if (_executingTask.IsCompleted)
        {
            return _executingTask;
        }

        // Otherwise it's running
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

Nothing awaits the returned task, so nothing is going to throw here. The check for IsCompleted is an optimization that avoids creating the async infrastructure if the task is already complete.

The task won't be checked again until StopAsync is called. That's when any exceptions will be thrown.

    public virtual async Task StopAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        // Stop called without start
        if (_executingTask == null)
        {
            return;
        }

        try
        {
            // Signal cancellation to the executing method
            _stoppingCts.Cancel();
        }
        finally
        {
            // Wait until the task completes or the stop token triggers
            await Task.WhenAny(_executingTask, Task.Delay(Timeout.Infinite, cancellationToken));
        }

    }

From Service to Host

In turn, the StartAsync method of each service is called by the StartAsync method of the Host implementation. The code reveals what's going on :

    public async Task StartAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken = default)
    {
        _logger.Starting();

        await _hostLifetime.WaitForStartAsync(cancellationToken);

        cancellationToken.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        _hostedServices = Services.GetService<IEnumerable<IHostedService>>();

        foreach (var hostedService in _hostedServices)
        {
            // Fire IHostedService.Start
            await hostedService.StartAsync(cancellationToken).ConfigureAwait(false);
        }

        // Fire IHostApplicationLifetime.Started
        _applicationLifetime?.NotifyStarted();

        _logger.Started();
    }

The interesting part is :

        foreach (var hostedService in _hostedServices)
        {
            // Fire IHostedService.Start
            await hostedService.StartAsync(cancellationToken).ConfigureAwait(false);
        }

All the code up to the first real asynchronous operation runs on the original thread. When the first asynchronous operation is encountered, the original thread is released. Everything after the await will resume once that task completes.

From Host to Main()

The RunAsync() method used in Main() to start the hosted services actually calls the Host's StartAsync but not StopAsync :

    public static async Task RunAsync(this IHost host, CancellationToken token = default)
    {
        try
        {
            await host.StartAsync(token);

            await host.WaitForShutdownAsync(token);
        }
        finally
        {
#if DISPOSE_ASYNC
            if (host is IAsyncDisposable asyncDisposable)
            {
                await asyncDisposable.DisposeAsync();
            }
            else
#endif
            {
                host.Dispose();
            }

        }
    }

This means that any exceptions thrown inside the chain from RunAsync to just before the first async operation will bubble up to the Main() call that starts the hosted services :

await host.RunAsync();

or

await host.RunConsoleAsync();

This means that everything up to the first real await in the list of BackgroundService objects runs on the original thread. Anything thrown there will bring down the application unless handled. Since the IHost.RunAsync() or IHost.StartAsync() are called in Main(), that's where the try/catch blocks should be placed.

This also means that putting slow code before the first real asynchronous operation could delay the entire application.

Everything after that first asynchronous operation will keep running on a threadpool thread. That's why exceptions thrown after that first operation won't bubble up until either the hosted services shut down by calling IHost.StopAsync or any orphaned tasks get GCd

Conclusion

Don't let exceptions escape ExecuteAsync. Catch them and handle them appropriately. The options are :

  • Log and "ignore" them. This will live the BackgroundService inoperative until either the user or some other event calls for an application shutdown. Exiting ExecuteAsync doesn't cause the application to exit.
  • Retry the operation. That's probably the most common option of a simple service.
  • In a queued or timed service, discard the message or event that faulted and move to the next one. That's probably the most resilient option. The faulty message can be inspected, moved to a "dead letter" queue, retried etc.
  • Explicitly ask for a shutdown. To do that, add the IHostedApplicationLifetTime interface as a dependency and call StopAsync from the catch block. This will call StopAsync on all other background services too

Documentation

The behaviour of hosted services and BackgroundService is described in Implement background tasks in microservices with IHostedService and the BackgroundService class and Background tasks with hosted services in ASP.NET Core.

The docs don't explain what happens if one of those services throws. They demonstrate specific use scenarios with explicit error handling. The queued background service example discards the message that caused the fault and moves to the next one :

    while (!cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
    {
        var workItem = await TaskQueue.DequeueAsync(cancellationToken);

        try
        {
            await workItem(cancellationToken);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            _logger.LogError(ex, 
               $"Error occurred executing {nameof(workItem)}.");
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • AMAZING explanation! thanks a lot. If you have any recommended sources to read more about this topic i would very appreciate it. – TheDotFestClub Jul 3 '19 at 14:00
  • @TheDotFestClub the links to the source unfortunately, and painful experience. The doc examples show how to create a BackgroundService but don't explain how it behaves, or why they examples are written this way. I've wasted quite a lot of time wandering why my application "hand" after ExecuteAsync finished normally - until I realised that something would have to call Stop. – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 14:05
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    @StephenCleary I spent the last hour chasing the code in Github. I can't even think any more. I can't start chasing the calls all over again. Some of those things I've found the hard way, some failures I understood just now going through the code. The ExecuteAsync documentation doesn't say anything about exceptions though. – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 14:55
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    @StephenCleary PS the Hosted Services article should be broken in at least 3 different articles. It tries to show too many things at once. It ends up both too shallow and too confusing – Panagiotis Kanavos Jul 3 '19 at 14:57
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    I've spent quite a bit of time reading github issues about this problem. This was the best explanation I've found so far. – Gustav Wengel Jun 1 at 7:11
1

Short answer

You're not awaiting the Task that is returned from the ExecuteAsync method. If you would have awaited it, you would have observed the exception from your first example.

Long answer

So this is about 'ignored' tasks and when that exception propagates.

First the reason why the exception before the await propagates instantly.

Task DoSomethingAsync()
{
    throw new Exception();
    await Task.Delay(1);
}

The part before the await statement executes synchronously, in the context you were calling it from. The stack remains intact. That's why you observe the exception on the call site. Now, you did not do anything with this exception, so it terminates your process.

In the second example:

Task DoSomethingAsync()
{
    await Task.Delay(1);
    throw new Exception();
}

The compiler has made boilerplate code that involves a continuation. So you call the method DoSomethingAsync. The method returns instantly. You do not await it, so your code continues instantly. The boilerplate has made a continuation to the line of code below the await statement. That continuation will be called 'something that is not your code' and will get the exception, wrapped in an asynchronous task. Now, that task will not do anything, until it is unwrapped.

Unobserved tasks want to let someone know something went wrong, so there is a trick in the finalizer. The finalizer will throw an exception if the task was unobserved. So in this case, the first point where the task can propagate its exception is when it is finalized, before it is garbage collected.

Your process does not crash instantly, but it will crash 'before' the task has been garbage collected.

Reading material:

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