1

I'm finding my code absolutely littered with optionals and guard/let statements.

An example is that I have an object that is filled over the course of a few VCs, so the variables in the object are optionals. When I go to use the whole request in a function though, it leads to ridiculous stuff like this:

func save(request: Request, completion: @escaping WebServiceResponse){
        guard let description = request.description,
            let totalAmount = request.totalAmount,
            let reserveAmount = request.reserveAmount,
            let holdingPeriod = request.holdingPeriod,
            let sender = request.sender,
            let receiver = request.receiver
            else {
                return
        }
        apiRequest(endpoint: apiEndpoint.Deal, path: "/save", body:
            [
                "description" : description,
                "total": totalAmount,
                "reserve": reserveAmount,
                "period":holdingPeriod,
                "from":sender,
                "to":receiver
            ], completion: completion)
    }

I'm finding these issues throughout my code whenever I use optionals, especially when I use optionals in a class object.

One answer suggested that I add further complexity to check if the method had been set... that would make my code even more unreadable. Is there any way to batch unwrap a class? Or maybe use a try/catch?

How can I improve?

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  • 1
    Without seeing the actual code you use to populate the fields of that class it's hard to give an exact advice. However, in general, it would definitely reduce the number of optional bindings if you populated all values at once and until then stored the values in temporary variables/data structures. – Dávid Pásztor Jul 3 '19 at 14:23
  • As @DávidPásztor said is not so easy to offer an optimal solution, but if you find yourself to do these guards over and over again maybe you should consider a struct with non-optional fields, an "all-or-nothing" thing. You could even dynamically create a computed property on your Request that would return such a struct (something like a Payload type that would hold all these values) or nil if any of those is missing. Then you would only have to guard against this one. I hope that this makes sense... – Alladinian Jul 3 '19 at 14:46
  • @DávidPásztor , The request class is built over the course of 3 View Controllers from user input – Code Wiget Jul 3 '19 at 15:14
3

This is a "builder" problem, and it has a few solutions.

One is to separate mutable vs immutable structures. Build this up with a mutable RequestBuilder that has var optional values. Then, when it's complete, convert that to an immutable Request, that has let non-optional values. This will force you to do this giant if-let one time, but then it'll be done.

Another is to give all the values default values. As a rule, collections (including Strings) should not be optional. Just make them empty.

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  • Default values won’t work for almost all, every field is necessary – Code Wiget Jul 4 '19 at 16:07
1

Rob Napier's builder method seems quite good. Here is another idea.

You could have a function on request that returns you the dictionary you need to pass into apiRequest or nil if any of the values are not filled in. You still have the big guard statement but it is only in one place:

extension Request 
{
    func makeDictionary() -> [String: String]?
    {
        guard let /* blah blah blah */ else { return nil }
        return [
                "description" : description,
                "total": totalAmount,
                "reserve": reserveAmount,
                "period":holdingPeriod,
                "from":sender,
                "to":receiver
            ]
    }
}

func save(request: Request, completion: @escaping WebServiceResponse){
        guard let body = request.makeDictionary() else { return }
        apiRequest(endpoint: apiEndpoint.Deal, path: "/save", body: body, completion: completion)
    }

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  • Both of these answers center around centralizing the single guard/let – Code Wiget Jul 4 '19 at 16:08

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