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When trying to use a function call to modify the value of a variable in the calling function, I observed the following difference in behavior when passing a list and set as function parameters.

#Passing list as parameter
def fun(a):
    a = a.append(13)

a = [12]
print(a)
fun(a)
print(a)

#Output
[12]
[12, 13]
#Passing set as a parameter
def fun(a):
    a = a.union({13})

a = {12}
print(a)
fun(a)
print(a)

#Output
{12}
{12}

My question is, why is the changes from the function carried over to the calling function when using a list but not when using set even though they are both of mutable data types?

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  • a.append alters the list a. a.union creates a new set but doesn't modify the original. They are not equivalent. – khelwood Jul 3 '19 at 14:46
  • 1
    Just because a type is mutable, doesn't mean that every method of that type mutates its value. – jasonharper Jul 3 '19 at 14:48
3

The operations you are comparing are not equivalent.

alist.append alters the list at alist (and returns None).
aset.union creates a new set but doesn't modify the original.

If you did aset.add(13) that would be the set equivalent of alist.append(13) (adding a new element to an existing collection).
If you did alist = alist + [13] that would be the list equivalent of aset = aset.union({13}) (creating a new collection containing extra elements).

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