1

I have a function foo() that takes a list of types T... and inside calls another (templated) function called do_stuff() for every element of a vector that is passed in. More specifically, we loop over the vector (of length sizeof...(T)), and would like to call do_stuff<Ti>() for vector[i], where Ti is the i'th type in T...

The information is available at compile time so I guess this is possible, but how we do it nicely?

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>

template <typename T>
T do_stuff(int param);

template <>
int do_stuff(int param)
{
    return int(100);
}

template <>
std::string do_stuff(int param)
{
    return std::string("foo");
}

template <typename... T>
void foo(const std::vector<int>& p)
{
    assert(p.size() == sizeof...(T));
    for (int i = 0; i < p.size(); ++i)
    {
        // Won't compile as T is not specified:
        //do_stuff(p[i]);
        // How do we choose the right T, in this case Ti from T...?
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> params = { 0,1,0,5 };
    foo<int, std::string, std::string, int>(params);
}
6

You can use a C++17 fold expression:

template <typename... T>
void foo(const std::vector<int>& p)
{
    assert(p.size() == sizeof...(T));

    std::size_t i{};
    (do_stuff<T>(p[i++]), ...);
}

live example on godbolt.org


Alternatively, you can avoid the mutable i variable with std::index_sequence:

template <typename... T>
void foo(const std::vector<int>& p)
{
    assert(p.size() == sizeof...(T));

    [&p]<auto... Is>(std::index_sequence<Is...>)
    {
        (do_stuff<T>(p[Is]), ...);
    }(std::index_sequence_for<T...>{});
}

live example on godbolt.org

| improve this answer | |
  • I like the fold solution, but what is happening in the second? Is that... a templated lambda function? – Dan Tony Jul 3 '19 at 15:02
  • @DanTony: yes, this is a C++20 feature. In C++17 you would need to create a separate template function that takes the index_sequence, resulting in more boilerplate. – Vittorio Romeo Jul 3 '19 at 15:09
4

What about as follows ?

template <typename ... T>
void foo (std::vector<int> const & p)
{
    assert(p.size() == sizeof...(T));

    using unused = int[];

    std::size_t  i{ 0u };

    (void)unused { 0, ((void)do_stuff<T>(p[i++]), 0)... };
}

If you can use C++17, see the Vittorio Romeo's answer for a more elegant and concise solution.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    That's UB with multiple i++ in the one expression, right? – Quimby Jul 3 '19 at 14:54
  • 1
    @Quimby Not when using an initializer list – NathanOliver Jul 3 '19 at 14:55
  • This looks very interesting! Where can I read more as to how this actually works? Or is there a simple explanation? – Dan Tony Jul 3 '19 at 15:01
  • 1
    @Quimby No problem. Initializer lists and comma operator list provide strong sequencing guarantees that make each element a full expression and each subsequent element sequenced after the preceding elements. – NathanOliver Jul 3 '19 at 15:01
  • @DanTony - take also in count that the comma operator (inside the round parentheses) execute the element on the left (so call the do_stuff() function) but discard it's result and "return" the value on the right; this way you can execute functions that doesn't return a value (or return not int values) inside the initialization of an array of int's. The (void) before the do_stuff() call is in case the function return a T type that redefine the comma operator. The first zero is in case the T... list is empty (you can't initialize an int[] with an empty initialization list). – max66 Jul 3 '19 at 15:10

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