1

When I run the following code I get the following runtime crash:

"pure virtual method called terminate called without an active exception"

I dont understand why polymorphism doesn't work here. Please can someone help me.

struct Base
{
    virtual void print()=0;
    virtual ~Base(){}
};

struct Derived: public Base
{
    void print(){cout << "this is Derived\n";}
};

struct Foo
{
    Foo(Base&& r): bref{r} {}
    void print(){
        bref.print();
    }
    Base& bref;
};

int main()
{
    Foo f{Derived()};
    f.print(); //it crashes here with above message
}
8
  • 6
    Derived() creates a temporary object. An object that is destructed once the call to the Foo constructor is finished. Where do you think the reference bref is actually referencing once the temporary object is destructed? Jul 3 '19 at 15:12
  • 3
    You shouldn't assign an r-value reference to an ordinary one. Either use two ordinary references or assign the r-value reference to an object instance; if you want to profit from move semantics, you should do: { Foo(Base&& r) : bref(std::move(r)) { } Base bref; }
    – Aconcagua
    Jul 3 '19 at 15:12
  • 1
    @Aconcagua since Base is pure virtual it will not compile.
    – Marek R
    Jul 3 '19 at 15:22
  • @MarekR Then make it a Derived instance; anyway what's the point of the rvalue ref here? You don't want to "steal" an instance, avoid a copy, etc.
    – curiousguy
    Jul 3 '19 at 15:35
  • 1
    @curiousguy I'm not OP just pointing out wrong comment.
    – Marek R
    Jul 3 '19 at 15:38
4

The lifetime of the temporary object Derived() extends until the full expression that is Foo f{Derived()};. f.bref is a dangling reference after that. f.print() calls bref.print() which has undefined behaviour.

Foo{Derived()}.print(); would be technically well defined, but storing an lvalue reference into an rvalue referred object passed to a constructor probably makes no sense.

1

bref is a dangling reference when you call it in Foo::print(). Maybe use unique_ptr like this.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
struct Base
{
    virtual void print()=0;
    virtual ~Base(){}
};

struct Derived: public Base
{
    void print(){std::cout << "this is Derived\n";}
};

struct Foo
{
    Foo(std::unique_ptr<Base>&& r): bref{std::move(r)} {}
    void print(){
        bref->print();
    }
    std::unique_ptr<Base> bref;
};

int main()
{
    Foo f{std::unique_ptr<Derived>(new Derived)}; //or make_unique
    f.print();
}

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