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I've tried and searched but am not finding much.

I'm trying to use CLM from the ordinal package to analyze some data. I understand that the clm function comes with the proportional odds assumption. This website (https://rcompanion.org/handbook/G_01.html) says that if you use "nominal_test", and that if any of the variables violate the proportional odds assumption (as in when you put it in the ordinal package function nominal_test, and it returns a significant p-value), then you can selectively relax the proportional odds assumption on those variables. So I tried this, but am confused as to how to really interpret the results.

For example I have some code :

glm_results = clm(Z ~ A +  B +  C + D + E + F + G + H +I+J + K,
                     data = the_data,
                    link = "logit", threshold = "flexible")
nominal_test(glm_results)

Z, the dependent variable, is an ordered variable with levels 2, 3, and 4 which 2 < 3 < 4. The rest of the variables are categorical and all but one of them has some form of hierarchical structure.

the nominal_test output is

            Df  logLik    AIC    LRT Pr(>Chi)   
<none>        -378.22 804.43                   
A           1 -376.94 803.88 2.5579 0.109744   
B           1 -377.61 805.22 1.2131 0.270710   
C           4 -374.13 804.26 8.1699 0.085549 . 
D           2 -376.76 805.53 2.9036 0.234153   
E           4 -376.40 808.79 3.6423 0.456581   
F           3 -373.67 801.33 9.0990 0.028003 * 
G           3 -377.56 809.13 1.3065 0.727584   
H           1 -374.36 798.72 7.7168 0.005471 **
I           1 -377.29 804.58 1.8543 0.173285   
J           1 -377.38 804.76 1.6760 0.195460   
K           1 -377.97 805.93 0.5000 0.479484 

According to this, only F, and H do not follow the proportional log odds assumption. So for those variables, I can relax F and H in my original glm formula. So I'm assuming that this means that for all variables other than F and H, the proportional odds assumption exists (the coefficient/difference contributed by an independent variable is the same whether it be comparing dependent variable Z2 to Z3 or Z3 to Z4). So I relax it in my function like this:

glm_results = clm(Z ~ A +  B +  C + D + E + F + G + H +I+J + K,
                     data = the_data,
                    link = "logit", threshold = "flexible",
                    nominal = ~F+H)
summary(glm_results)

the results are as follows:

link  threshold nobs logLik  AIC    niter max.grad cond.H 
 logit flexible  446  -370.16 796.31 6(0)  3.22e-10 6.0e+02

Coefficients: (4 not defined because of singularities)
                         Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)    
A           -0.28149    0.39319  -0.716 0.474045    
B           -0.00197    0.30173  -0.007 0.994792    
C4           1.35216    0.48257   2.802 0.005079 ** 
C5           1.19916    0.44374   2.702 0.006884 ** 
C6           1.69882    0.44899   3.784 0.000155 ***
C7           1.76681    0.45556   3.878 0.000105 ***
D2          -1.46896    0.36901  -3.981 6.87e-05 ***
D3          -0.52158    0.50353  -1.036 0.300275    
E2          -0.63759    0.33855  -1.883 0.059660 .  
E3          -0.79584    0.28221  -2.820 0.004801 ** 
E4          -0.07828    0.35013  -0.224 0.823081    
E5           0.02954    0.42210   0.070 0.944205    
F2             NA         NA      NA       NA    
F3             NA         NA      NA       NA    
F4             NA         NA      NA       NA    
G2          -0.72327    0.46516  -1.555 0.119969    
G3          -1.02087    0.38398  -2.659 0.007846 ** 
G4          -1.27764    0.44615  -2.864 0.004187 ** 
H            NA         NA      NA       NA    
I          -0.24169    0.53224  -0.454 0.649756    
J          -0.40141    0.54486  -0.737 0.461294    
K          -0.22664    0.55336  -0.410 0.682119    
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

Threshold coefficients:
                             Estimate Std. Error z value
2|3.(Intercept)              -2.63233    0.89030  -2.957
3|4.(Intercept)              -0.09137    0.88626  -0.103
2|3.F2       -0.78198    0.42903  -1.823
3|4.F2        0.13041    0.34849   0.374
2|3.F3       -0.68971    0.42141  -1.637
3|4.F3       -0.63912    0.33739  -1.894
2|3.F4       -0.33434    0.45516  -0.735
3|4.F4       -0.79488    0.36469  -2.180
2|3.H1       -0.94242    0.34311  -2.747
3|4.H1        0.01908    0.24686   0.077

Note that the "singularities" are the F and H variables that I chose to relax. Also note that E2,E3,E4,E5 etc are the levels of the categorical variables. You would get a coefficient for each pair-wise comparison to the base/lowest level of each categorical variable (E2 vs E1, E3 vs E1). But you only have one coefficient for the variables that are not relaxed by "nominal", because we're assuming proportional log odds for those variables. For the "nominal" variables you have two different coefficients for each level. One for the difference between 2 and 3 for the dependent variables, and another for the difference between 3 and 4. This makes sense, because you're not assuming that the odds is the same for 2|3 and 3|4.

However, then I simply tried relaxing with nominal for other variables that weren't necessarily indicated by the nominal_test to need the relaxation. For example I did the following:

glm_results = clm(Z ~ A +  B +  C + D + E + F + G + H +I+J + K,
                     data = the_data,
                    link = "logit", threshold = "flexible",
                    nominal = ~F+E+H)
summary(glm_results)

I added in variable E to the nominal. I get the following results in the "threshold" section for the summary which is for the "nominal" relaxed variables:

              Estimate Std. Error z value
2|3.E2        1.34267    0.50887   2.639
3|4.E2        0.26653    0.36836   0.724
2|3.E3        0.80729    0.45744   1.765
3|4.E3        0.95040    0.33940   2.800
2|3.E4        0.23697    0.52950   0.448
3|4.E4        0.02926    0.40370   0.072
2|3.E5        0.48218    0.60322   0.799
3|4.E5       -0.18231    0.43848  -0.416

So my problem is that, in my mind, if the proportional odds assumption isn't violated for a variable, shouldn't the coefficients be similar for 2|3 and 3|4 of that categorical variable? I could 1000% be doing this all wrong. For example the coefficients for 2|3.E4 and 3|4.E4 seem to be quite different. Is my interpretation not correct? Similarly in those that were originally considered candidates for the relaxation (like variable F), 2|3.F3 and 3|4.F3 coefficients are very similar.

I'm wondering if I could get some direction on how exactly to interpret these. How do I properly decide which variables to relax the odds assumption on? I assumed that for those variables that did NOT violate the proportional log odds assumption, when you put them in the "nominal" function, the coefficients you get for 2|3 and 3|4 for the same categorical pairwise comparison, ought to be similar. Is that an incorrect interpretation or assumption to make?

If this is not the best, way how could I use VGLM to test for but then also relax specific variables in my code?

Thank you for your support and guidance.

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