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I'm trying to pipe STDOUT from Python/Erlport back to Elixir. I've got :python calls working fine, I just want to send the STDOUT stuff from Python back to Elixir for logging but I can't wrap my head around how to achieve that. I know it's possible even though I'm using Python 2.7.

I've got a Genserver wrapper around the :python module so that my call works like so:

pid = Python.start()
Python.call(pid, :bridge, :register_handler, [self()]) 

Python.call just looks like this:

def call(pid, module, function, args \\ []) do
  :python.call(pid, module, function, args)
end

Anything from :bridge (i.e., bridge.py) is lost to STDOUT unless I explicitly return something (obviously halting the function). What can I do to capture STDOUT?

My idea was to call something like Python.call(pid, :builtins, :print, [self()]) but that results in a bunch of errors and I really don't know if that's the right direction at all.

I actually want to pipe it into a Phoenix channel, but that's the easy part (I hope). Any advice? Thanks.

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My idea was to call something like Python.call(pid, :builtins, :print, [self()]) but that results in a bunch of errors and I really don't know if that's the right direction at all.

self() is not where the output goes--rather self() is the argument for print, i.e. what python will print out.

I think erlport can only handle MFA calls(module, function, argument), and because print isn't a function in python 2.7, I think you need to wrap a function around print, e.g.:

myprint.py:

def print_this(str):
    print str

I just want to send the STDOUT stuff from Python back to Elixir for logging but I can't wrap my head around how to achieve that. I know it's possible even though I'm using Python 2.7

The erlport docs say:

As a convenient feature ErlPort also supports redirection of Python`s STDOUT to Erlang...

That appears to be the default setup, so you don't have to do anything to get python stdout to be redirected to elixir stdout. The question then becomes: "How do you log elixir stdout to a file?"

I'm able to log elixir stdout to a file like this:

friends.ex:

defmodule Friends do

  use Export.Python

  def go do

    #Get path to logfile:

    priv_path = :code.priv_dir(:friends)
    logfile_path = Path.join([priv_path, "log", "mylog.log"])

    #Redirect stdout:

    {:ok, io_pid} = File.open(logfile_path, [:append])
    Process.group_leader(self(), io_pid)

    #Send output to stdout:

    IO.puts "Am I in the log file??!"

    python_path = Path.expand("lib/python") 
    {:ok, py} = Python.start(
                 python: "python2.7",
                 python_path: python_path
               )

    Python.call(py, "myprint", "print_this", ["hello world!"])
    Python.call(py, "myprint", "print_this", ["goodbye..."])

    Python.stop(py)
  end

end

This is my directory structure:

friends
    /lib
      /friends
      /python
          myprint.py
      friends.ex
   /priv
      /log
          mylog.log

In iex:

~/elixir_programs/friends$ iex -S mix
Erlang/OTP 20 [erts-9.3] [source] [64-bit] [smp:4:4] [ds:4:4:10] [async-threads:10] [hipe] [kernel-poll:false]
Compiling 1 file (.ex)
Interactive Elixir (1.8.2) - press Ctrl+C to exit (type h() ENTER for help)

iex(1)> Friends.go
iex(2)>

In the log file:

Am I in the log file??!
hello world!
goodbye...
[33m[36m:ok[0m[33m[0m

(I don't know what that junk is on the last line. Edit: Hmmm...it's the atom :ok surrounded by some other stuff.)

If I comment out everything inside go() above the python_path line, then I get:

iex(1)> Friends.go
hello world!
goodbye...
:ok

In erlang/elixir file I/O is handled by starting a process to which requests are sent to either write to the file or read the file. I think stdout gets sent to whatever process is the group_leader, and if the process handling file I/O is the group_leader, then stdout gets sent to the file.

I don't know if messing with the group_leader will screw things up when you are using a GenServer. There is a warning in the erlang docs:

The group leader should be rarely changed in applications with a supervision tree, because OTP assumes the group leader of their processes is their application master.

.

  • Thanks for your thoughtful answer. I'll mark it as accepted since it definitely explains thing better than my ad-hoc approach. – cd-rum Jul 8 at 23:40
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    @cd-rum, Ah, don't do that. In your answer, you said, I've got a Genserver around the :python instance,--I think it would be helpful if you showed how you set that up. I recently used a GenServer to get around a similar type of problem. In my case, a process called a function which made that process the owner of a socket, which meant that only that process could send and receive messages from a socket. I used a GenServer's handle_call() to call the function, which meant that the GenServer became the owner, and messages from the socket were handled by handle_info(). – 7stud Jul 8 at 23:55
  • Fair, I'll expand on my answer shortly. – cd-rum Jul 8 at 23:58
  • @cd-rum, Okay, I edited my answer which means you can remove the checkmark, and when you expand your answer, you can accept your own answer. – 7stud Jul 9 at 0:01
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    I don't know what that junk is on the last line. Edit: Hmmm...it's the atom :ok surrounded by some other stuff.) -- The "other stuff" consists of color codes which are interpreted by the terminal. :ok would display in blue (or something) in the terminal. – 7stud Jul 9 at 16:31
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For anyone else getting stuck with this kinda thing: since I've got a Genserver around the :python instance, I've just leveraged handle_info:

def handle_info({:python, message}, session) do
  message |> String.split("\n", trim: true)
  SomeWeb.Endpoint.broadcast("log", "update", %{body: message})

  {:stop, :normal,  session}
end

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