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I am trying to remove parenthesis from the print function.

frames = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
scores = [10,7,10,7,6,7,9,5,10]

def FindLowest(scores):

    sorted_list = sorted(scores)
    low = sorted_list[0]
    rnd = 0

    for i in range(len(frames)):
        if scores[i] == low:
            rnd = i + 1
            break
    return low, rnd

    print("Lowest Score is",FindLowest(scores))

Lowest score is 5 and it occured in frame 8

actual output = Lowest score is (5,8)

1

Try using a print statement with placeholders for the low score and its frame:

def FindLowest(scores):
    sorted_list = sorted(scores)
    low = sorted_list[0]
    rnd = 0

    for i in range(len(frames)):
        if scores[i] == low:
        rnd = i + 1
        break

    return low, rnd

result = FindLowest(score)

print "Lowest score is %d and it occured in frame %d" % (result[0], result[1])

Or use this version of print if you are using Python 3:

print("Lowest score is %d and it occured in frame %d" % (result[0], result[1]))
  • This uses Python 2 print syntax in what must be presumed to be a question about Python 3. – tripleee Jul 4 at 5:29
  • @tripleee This wasn't completely clear to me, but I've updated with the syntax for Python 3 as well. – Tim Biegeleisen Jul 4 at 5:31
  • That actually worked, thank you – TSG Baird Jul 4 at 12:29
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Change this

return low, rnd

to this

return f'{low}, {rnd}'
  • Making a function return a human-readable string instead of a computer-readable representation of the results seems dubious to me. This wrecks the reusability of the function and pushes user-oriented functionality away from the user-facing surface. – tripleee Jul 4 at 7:10
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Your function returns a tuple, and you are printing that tuple. You'll need to pick apart the tuple, or refactor the function to return something else.

By the by, your function seems rather inefficient. It would make more sense to zip two lists and just sort by the score element.

def FindLowest(scores):
    return min(enumerate(scores), key=lambda x: x[1])

idx, score = FindLowest(scores)
print("Lowest score is {0} and it occurred in frame {1}".format(score, frames[idx]))

enumerate pairs up each list index with its value in the list; we then pick the index, value pair with the lowest value.

Preferring min() over sorted()[0] is possibly marginally more efficient, but above all, it tells the reader exactly what's going on here.

This also avoids using frames as a global inside the function. Alternatively, you could pass a list of frames as a second argument, but then perhaps you should really rename the function, too. Or just inline it, since it's really simple:

score, frame = min(zip(scores, frames), key=lambda x: x[0])

But I like the first approach better.

  • Notice how we repeatedly use variations of min(thing, key=lambda x: x(n]) to sort a list of lists by the nth element. It would be nice if there was a built-in Python function like def nth(n): return lambda x: x[n] but alas, there isn't (itertools contains an nth function but it's not directly suitable here). See also stackoverflow.com/questions/2492087/… – tripleee Jul 4 at 6:09
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Only need to change your print to this:

print("Lowest score is %d and it occurred in frame %d" % FindLowest(scores))
0

The problem is that that you are returning a tuple from the function and printing the whole tuple.

instead print each element of tuple

frames = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
scores = [10,7,10,7,6,7,9,5,10]

def FindLowest(scores):

    sorted_list = sorted(scores)
    low = sorted_list[0]
    rnd = 0

    for i in range(len(frames)):
        if scores[i] == low:
            rnd = i + 1
            break
    return low, rnd
print("Lowest Score is " + str(FindLowest(scores)[0]) + "," + str(FindLowest(scores)[1]))

or for python2 printing

frames = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
scores = [10,7,10,7,6,7,9,5,10]

def FindLowest(scores):

    sorted_list = sorted(scores)
    low = sorted_list[0]
    rnd = 0

    for i in range(len(frames)):
        if scores[i] == low:
            rnd = i + 1
            break
    return low, rnd
a,b = FindLowest(scores)
print("Lowest Score is ",a,b)
  • Why do you think unpacking the tuple into a pair of variables is specifically a Python 2 solution? It works fine in Python 3 too. – tripleee Jul 4 at 5:55
  • unpacking tuple works fine in python3 i was just talking about the print statement.Therfore as it is misleading i have edited it – Shaurya Vardhan Singh Jul 4 at 7:25
  • The str() mess should certainly work in Python 2 as well, though it seems remarkably inelegant compared to alternatives. – tripleee Jul 4 at 7:31
  • @tripleee Grammatical correction: Technically speaking, there can be only one alternative (of two possibilities). So, you might have said compared to an alternative or if not then compared to other options. – Tim Biegeleisen Jul 4 at 12:30
  • There are many alternatives. Maybe "compared to the alternatives" would be more idiomatic, but I didn't want to imply that all of them are represented in the current crop of answers. As per Webster's, alternative is not restricted to one of two options (the dictionary article specifically says one of two or more options). – tripleee Jul 4 at 12:41

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