What is the difference between precision and scale in Oracle? In tutorials they usually leave scale empty and set precision to 6 when creating a primary key.

What do precision and scale stand for?

Precision 4, scale 2: 99.99

Precision 10, scale 0: 9999999999

Precision 8, scale 3: 99999.999

Precision 5, scale -3: 99999000

  • 7
    can you please explain the behavior of negative scales? – Geek Jun 19 '14 at 13:08
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    looks like rounds/ignores that many integer values left of decimal – JDPeckham Jun 20 '14 at 3:54
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    keep in mind that precision is always includes the scale portion. e.g: Precision 4, scale 2 - will fail any number > 99.9999..; try: select cast (99.99999 as NUMBER(4,2)) from dual; //OK; select cast (100.9 as NUMBER(4,2)) from dual; //FAIL; – Jama Djafarov Mar 6 '15 at 17:47
  • @JamaDjafarov 99.99999 fails as can be seen below: ` 21:53:54 CB900@XYZ > select cast (99.99999 as NUMBER(4,2)) from dual; select cast (99.99999 as NUMBER(4,2)) from dual * ERROR at line 1: ORA-01438: value larger than specified precision allowed for this column 21:52:32 CB900@ASCEND1 > select version from v$instance; VERSION --------------------------------------------------- 12.1.0.2.0 ` – Phalgun Jun 25 '17 at 11:58
  • @Phalgun select cast(99.9999 as NUMBER(4,2)) from DUAL; is a bad example because the truncation will round the number up from 99 to 100, which is then too large for a NUMBER(4,2). Try select cast(88.8888 as NUMBER(4,2)) from DUAL; instead to see the response is 88.89. – superbeck Jan 18 at 19:02

Precision is the number of significant digits. Oracle guarantees the portability of numbers with precision ranging from 1 to 38.

Scale is the number of digits to the right (positive) or left (negative) of the decimal point. The scale can range from -84 to 127.

In your case, ID with precision 6 means it won't accept a number with 7 or more significant digits.

Reference:

http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28318/datatype.htm#CNCPT1832

That page also has some examples that will make you understand precision and scale.

  • 1
    that mean the last bumber will be 1000000? – user700792 Apr 16 '11 at 21:17
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    +1: I think the key to understanding this is to understand the internal number format -- mantissa and exponent. Precision places a limit on the possible length of the mantissa, and scale places a limit on the possible minimum of exponent. – David Aldridge Jun 11 '13 at 12:03
  • @DavidAldridge I echo you. I think you should consider posting it as an answer regarding the mantissa and exponent. A number is actually stored in a variable length format. – Lalit Kumar B May 28 '15 at 5:10

Precision is the total number of digits. Scale is the number of digits after the decimal point.

Example:
NUMBER(7,5): 12.12345
NUMBER(5,0): 12345

  • 11
    Precision is the total number of digits, not the number to the left of the decimal point. – David Aldridge Jun 11 '13 at 11:51
  • And Scale is the number of digits to the right (positive) or left (negative) of the decimal point, not just after the decimal point. – Lalit Kumar B May 28 '15 at 5:11

Maybe more clear:

Note that precision is the total number of digits, scale included

NUMBER(Precision,Scale)

Precision 5, scale 3 : 54.321

Precision 5, scale 1 : 5432.1

Precision 5, scale 0 : 54321

Precision 5, scale -1: 54320

Precision 5, scale -3: 54000

  • this is a very nice explanation. If you can put that precision is total number of digits in top, it would be more easy – Yogamurthy Jul 16 '16 at 1:39
  • 1
    Change done. Thanks. – Eric Bole-Feysot Aug 8 '16 at 14:31

If value is 9999.988 and Precision 4, scale 2 then it means 9999(it represents precision).99(scale is 2 so .988 is rounded to .99)

If value is 9999.9887 and precision is 4, scale is 2 then it means 9999.99

  • 6
    No, precision is the number of significant digits to store. In both your cases the precision stored is 6 and the scale is 2. – David Aldridge Jun 11 '13 at 12:01

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