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Statically typed vs dynamically typed has been asked repeatedly on stackoverflow, for example here.

The consensus seems to be (quoting from the top answer of the above link):

A language is statically typed if the type of a variable is known at compile time.

And a dynamic language:

A language is dynamically typed if the type is associated with run-time values, and not named variables/fields/etc.

Perl seems to be statically typed by this (or other common definitions of static/dynamic typing). It has 3 types: scalar, array, hash (ignoring things like references for simplicity's sake). Types are declared along with variables:

my $x = 10;                   # declares a scalar variable named x
my @y = (1, 2, 3);            # declares an array variable named y
my %z = (one => 1, two => 2); # declares a hash variable named z

The $, @ and % above tell Perl which type you want; I'd count this as a form of explicit typing.

Once x has been declared as a scalar, as above, it's impossible to store a non-scalar value in x:

$x = @y;                      # x is now 3

Will convert y to a scalar (in Perl, array to scalar conversion result in the length of the array). I blame this on weak typing (Perl very liberally allows conversions between its 3 types), rather than dynamic typing.

Whereas in most statically typed languages, such an assignment would be an error, in Perl it is ok because of implicit conversions (similar to how bool x = 1; is fine in C/C++, but not in Java: both are statically typed, but Java is more strongly typed in this case). The only reason this conversion happened at all in Perl is because of the type of x, which again suggests Perl is statically typed.

Another argument people have against Perl being statically typed is that floats, ints, and strings are all stored in the same type of variable (scalars). But this really has nothing to do with static or dynamic typing. Within Perl's type system (which has only 3 types), there is no difference between floats, ints and strings. These all have type scalar. This is similar to saying C89 isn't statically typed because it used the int type to represent both ints and bools.

Obviously, this line of reasoning is ridiculous. Perl has very little in common with what most people think of as statically typed languages like C/C++, Java, OCaml, etc.

My question is, what's wrong with this line of reasoning?

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  • I am of course aware that you could pretend a language like Python is "statically typed" with one type (let's call it Py_Object), but Perl is different from Python in this regard in that Perl will convert values based on the type of variables (which it knows at compile time). Jul 4, 2019 at 20:50
  • In typed languages, you can create your own types or classes, and use them as type restrictions. In Perl, you can create classes (packages), but you can't use them as types.
    – choroba
    Jul 4, 2019 at 21:01
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    First of all, there's no such consensus. And if there is a consensus, then it only goes to show that the terms "statically-typed language" and "dynamically-typed language" are useless. Too many languages would qualify as both/neither (including all languages supporting virtual methods, such as Perl, Java and C++).
    – ikegami
    Jul 4, 2019 at 21:18
  • @choroba I don't think that really has anything to do with static/dynamic typing. Early pre-standardized versions of C didn't have structs, but no one would claim early C wasn't statically typed.. Jul 4, 2019 at 21:32
  • @ikegami i'd say statically and dynamically typed have a widely accepted meaning in industry, even if the terms are meaningless. Jul 4, 2019 at 21:33

1 Answer 1

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I disagree on there being a consensus on the definitions you posted. But like your claim, that's opinion-based, and thus off-topic.

The posted definitions of "statically-typed language" and "dynamically-typed language" are useless. These are imaginary buckets into which very few languages fit.


According to the definition of statically-typed language you posted, Perl is a statically-typed language.

  • The type of $a is known to be a scalar at compile-time.
  • The type of @a is known to be an array at compile-time.

According to the definition of statically-typed language you posted, Perl isn't a statically-typed language.

  • $a could contain a signed integer (IV).
  • $a could contain a string (PV).
  • $a could contain a reference (RV) to an object of class Foo.

According to the definition of dynamically-typed language you posted, Perl is a dynamically-typed language.

  • $a could contain a signed integer (IV).
  • $a could contain a string (PV).
  • $a could contain a reference (RV) to an object of class Foo.

According to the definition of dynamically-typed language you posted, Perl isn't a dynamically-typed language.

  • The type of $a is known to be a scalar at compile-time.
  • The type of @a is known to be an array at compile-time.

Similarly, C++, C#, Java, BASIC and assembler languages are both/neither statically-typed and dynamically-typed. Even C doesn't fit the posted definition of statically-typed perfectly.

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  • Related reading: Is Perl weakly or strongly typed? Spoiler: Also meaningless terms!
    – ikegami
    Jul 4, 2019 at 21:25
  • I was hoping for something more "satisfying" but this answers it Jul 5, 2019 at 0:29
  • Oh, by the way, arrays and hash are really just scalars (of type SVt_PVAV and SVt_PVHV) respectively.
    – ikegami
    Jul 5, 2019 at 6:40

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