3

I experiment with the D language, and find the std.variant cool.

But then I find it confusing.

For example,

import std.stdio;
void main()
{
  string x = "";
  x ~= 'v';
  writeln(x);
}

This does what is expected.

But this,

import std.stdio;
import std.variant;
void main()
{
  Variant x = "";
  x ~= 'v';
  writeln(x);
}

gives a hard-to-decipher RUNTIME error.

Why is that?

Here is the message.

std.variant.VariantException@std/variant.d(1675): Variant: attempting to use incompatible types char and immutable(char)[]
----------------
??:? inout @property inout(immutable(char)[]) std.variant.VariantN!(32uL).VariantN.get!(immutable(char)[]).get() [0x106f84654]
??:? long std.variant.VariantN!(32uL).VariantN.handler!(immutable(char)[]).handler(std.variant.VariantN!(32uL).VariantN.OpID, ubyte[32]*, void*) [0x106f7559d]
??:? std.variant.VariantN!(32uL).VariantN std.variant.VariantN!(32uL).VariantN.opOpAssign!("~", char).opOpAssign(char) [0x106f84a1d]
??:? _Dmain [0x106f74d8d]
  • 3
    Please consider including the error message, so that we may be able to decypher it. Unwritten it is even harder, for me at least :-) – Stephane Rolland Jul 5 at 9:59
  • @StephaneRolland ok. – ntysdd Jul 5 at 10:02
  • Never done any D tutorial. I may be wrong, but as it's created by one of the most influent C++ programmer A Alexandrescu, I read the message with a C++ mindset. The error message seems to say: "hey you give me a simple char, when I only work with an array of constant char that I call immutable char. – Stephane Rolland Jul 5 at 10:22
  • Moreover, I am totally puzzled by your usage of the operator ~=. What does it mean in D? The introductionary page: learnxinyminutes.com/docs/d does not even mention this operator. In C++ there's ~ for negating binary values... but I am wondering how useful could be a ~= operator. – Stephane Rolland Jul 5 at 10:25
  • 1
    @StephaneRolland I think "~" means string concat, so "~=" means concat in place. I read somewhere that D has a Variant type, which makes it feels like a "dynamic" language, but when I played with it, I found it somehow blowed up with the "~=" operator. I tried change the char type to immutable char, and indeed the error is gone. I am still curious why the Variant type refuses the char type version. – ntysdd Jul 5 at 10:36
4

This seems like a bug in std.variant.Variant. The problem here is char and immutable(char) are two different types, and Variant doesn't know that they're closely related. There are two different workaround to this: Either make x hold a char[] instead of immutable(char)[] (also known as string), or make 'v' an immutable(char):

import std.stdio;
import std.variant;
void main()
{
  Variant x = "".dup; // Duplicate the string to make it a heap-allocated, mutable string.
  x ~= 'v';
  writeln(x);
}

or

import std.stdio;
import std.variant;
void main()
{
  Variant x = "";
  x ~= cast(immutable)'v'; // Make 'v' explicitly immutable.
  writeln(x);
}

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