4

We all know that Skip() can omit records that are not needed at the start of a collection.

But is there a way to Skip() records at the end of a collection?

How do you not take the last record in a collection?

Or do you have to do it via Take()

ie, the below code,

var collection = MyCollection

var listCount = collection.Count();

var takeList = collection.Take(listCount - 1);

Is this the only way exclude the last record in a collection?

  • 1
    There is MoreLinq with lots of functionalities, and one of them is SkipLast that essentially does the same thing as you did. – Dialecticus Jul 6 '19 at 10:46
  • SkipLast also does some extra magic if Count cannot be determined without actually counting the enumeration, so the code enumerates only once, instead of twice. – Dialecticus Jul 6 '19 at 10:53
  • @Dialecticus, SkipLast does not show in my MoreLing library. Is it a separate property? – KyloRen Jul 6 '19 at 10:55
  • 1
    It's in MoreLinq.MoreEnumerable namespace, like all the rest. If it's not there you may have an old version of the library. You can also just copy-paste the code from the second link I provided. Just have to copy several sources, because there are dependecies on other parts of the library – Dialecticus Jul 6 '19 at 10:58
  • See marked duplicates. Both include generalized "skip last N" implementations, similar to those being proposed below. – Peter Duniho Jul 8 '19 at 0:43
2

What about this:

static public IEnumerable<T> SkipLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data, int count)
{
  if (data == null || count < 0) yield break;

  Queue<T> queue = new Queue<T>(data.Take(count));

  foreach (T item in data.Skip(count))
  {
    queue.Enqueue(item);
    yield return queue.Dequeue();
  }
}

Update

With help from some reviews an optimized version building on the same idea could be:

static public IEnumerable<T> SkipLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data, int count)
{
  if (data == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(data));
  if (count <= 0) return data;

  if (data is ICollection<T> collection)
    return collection.Take(collection.Count - count);

  IEnumerable<T> Skipper()
  {
    using (var enumer = data.GetEnumerator())
    {
      T[] queue = new T[count];
      int index = 0;

      while (index < count && enumer.MoveNext())
        queue[index++] = enumer.Current;

      index = -1;
      while (enumer.MoveNext())
      {
        index = (index + 1) % count;
        yield return queue[index];
        queue[index] = enumer.Current;
      }
    }
  }

  return Skipper();
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    I like this approach, personally speaking. Here I thought i could have a sleepy, dozey weekend, and there comes your code requiring me to actually be awake and pay attention while looking at it. It's a real mind twister, at least for me... ;-) – user2819245 Jul 6 '19 at 12:31
  • @elgonzo: thanks for your comment. Apparently I can't wake Mr. Ian Mercer from his weekend slumper so he can give an invalidating example :-) – Henrik Hansen Jul 6 '19 at 12:38
  • 2
    Yeah, sorry, you are right; it does work but it potentially enumerates the first count elements twice which is not ideal. May be better to iterate over all but yield return from queue only after passing count elements. – Ian Mercer Jul 6 '19 at 17:23
  • Enumerating twice could cause a second database query, in the context of LINQ to SQL, and the second query could potentially fetch a different number of elements. – Theodor Zoulias Jul 7 '19 at 18:01
  • 1
    The ICollection optimization is useful. The explicit circular buffer, not so much, since that's essentially the internal implementation of Queue<T>. You might as well just use Queue<T>, which will give you the same performance but with much easier code. – Peter Duniho Jul 8 '19 at 0:40
5

With enumerator you can efficiently delay yielding by one enumeration.

public static IEnumerable<T> WithoutLast<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    using (IEnumerator<T> e = source.GetEnumerator()) 
    {
        if (e.MoveNext() == false) yield break;

        var current = e.Current;
        while (e.MoveNext())
        {
            yield return current;
            current = e.Current;
        }
    }   
}

Usage

var items = new int[] {};
items.WithoutLast(); // returns empty

var items = new int[] { 1 };
items.WithoutLast(); // returns empty

var items = new int[] { 1, 2 };
items.WithoutLast(); // returns { 1 }

var items = new int[] { 1, 2, 3 };
items.WithoutLast(); // returns { 1, 2 }
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Please explain downvote, I would be glad to correct or delete my answer if it is wrong – Fabio Jul 7 '19 at 19:32
  • This appears to be the simplest and most efficient solution. The only change might be to throw if the sequence is empty. – Kit Jul 7 '19 at 19:59
  • @Fabio: But this can only handle to skip the one last. But what about skipping the 5 last items? – Henrik Hansen Jul 7 '19 at 20:52
  • 2
    @HenrikHansen, OP's question is about skipping last record: "How do you not take the last record in a collection?". I was wonder why everybody tried to implement skipping of multiple items. YAGNI? ;) – Fabio Jul 7 '19 at 20:55
  • For multiple items you need to store required amount of items before you start yielding them one by one when storage size exceeds given count. Other answers already provide valuable solutions – Fabio Jul 7 '19 at 20:57
3

A slightly different version of Henrik Hansen's answer:

static public IEnumerable<TSource> SkipLast<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count)
{
    if (count < 0) count = 0;
    var queue = new Queue<TSource>(count + 1);
    foreach (TSource item in source)
    {
        queue.Enqueue(item);
        if (queue.Count > count) yield return queue.Dequeue();
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
1

One way would be:

var result = l.Reverse().Skip(1);

And if needed another Reverse to get them back in the original order.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    The Reverse methods buffers all the elements of the source, and then enumerates the buffer backwards. As a solution to this problem, it is quite inefficient. – Theodor Zoulias Jul 7 '19 at 19:42
  • @TheodorZoulias It is a simple one liner to achieve the goal. Of course if the collection is very large you might need a more delicate solution, but this might very well be enough. You start simple and than make it more complicated if needed. – Magnus Jul 8 '19 at 5:43
  • Fair enough. 😃 – Theodor Zoulias Jul 8 '19 at 6:17

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