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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subtyping says

In programming language theory, subtyping (also subtype polymorphism or inclusion polymorphism) is a form of type polymorphism in which a subtype is a datatype that is related to another datatype (the supertype) by some notion of substitutability, meaning that program elements, typically subroutines or functions, written to operate on elements of the supertype can also operate on elements of the subtype.

In the concept of "subtype", when explaining "substitutability" as "program elements, typically subroutines or functions, written to operate on elements of the supertype can also operate on elements of the subtype", does it assume/require dynamic method binding (e.g. the one specified as virtual functions in C++)?

Specifically, given a type B with a method m(), a function

void f(B b){
    b.m();
}

and a subtype S of B which redefines m() method, which does S being a subtype of B according to the meaning of "substitutability" in the wikipedia article mean:

  1. either if calling f() with an instance s of S, then b.m() in f() will invoke S.m() instead of invoking B.m(), (this case requires dynamic method binding.)
  2. or if replace B with S in the definition of f(),

    void f(S s){
        S.m();
    }
    

    still work, i.e. f() can operate with both B and S, i.e. "subtype" only requires thatS also has a method m() with the same signature as B.m()? (This case doesn't require dynamic method binding.)

Thanks.

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