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I'm creating a simply show more solution for a page where there are n text elements that need toggling between show and hide. n is dynamic and not fixed.

For the purposes of this question, I'm exploring non-JS, CSS-only solutions.

It's possible to achieve a show and hide toggle functionality for a single element via CSS (solution below). But how does one extend it to n elements? Would be great to get an illustrative, working answer.


How I would do it in a single text element case:

#textarea {
    /* hide by default: */
    display: none;
}

/* when the checkbox is checked, show the neighbouring #textarea element: */
#textAreaToggle:checked + #textarea {
    display: block;
}

/* position the checkbox off-screen: */
input[type="checkbox"] {
    position: absolute;
    left: -1000px;
}

/* Aesthetics only, adjust to taste: */
label {
    display: block;
}

/* when the checkbox is unchecked (its default state) show the text
   'Show ' in the label element: */
#textAreaToggle + #textarea + label::before {
    content: 'Show ';
}

/* when the checkbox is checked 'Hide ' in the label element; the
   general-sibling combinator '~' is required for a bug in Chrome: */
#textAreaToggle:checked ~ #textarea + label::before {
    content: 'Hide ';
}
<input id="textAreaToggle" type="checkbox" /><p id="textarea">This is hidden textarea, that needs to be shown</p><label for="textAreaToggle">textarea</label>

This single-case solution is based on this answer, and it's tried and tested. You can run the code snippet to see for yourself.

But I'm struggling to generalize it for n text elements on a single page (in a CSS-only setting), thus this question.

1

You want different toggles for different text. You can give them unique id's to work with and then aggregate all of them in the ~ selector. So

For #fortext(1) checked, we display #textarea(1)

For #fortext(2) checked, we display #textarea(2)

For #fortext(n) checked, we display #textarea(n)

p {
  /* hide by default: */
  display: none;
}

#fortext1:checked~#textarea1,
#fortext2:checked~#textarea2,
#fortext3:checked~#textarea3 {
  display: block;
}
<input id="fortext1" type="checkbox" /><br>
<p id="textarea1">textarea1</p>
<input id="fortext2" type="checkbox" /><br>
<p id="textarea2">textarea2</p>
<input id="fortext3" type="checkbox" /><br>
<p id="textarea3">textarea3</p>

The general sibling selector selects the next sibling of the selector. Like this

selector ~ siblings to affect {
   code goes here
}

You can understand this by the snippet below

.selector~p { /* this means that after the class selector, every p sibling will be colored red */ 
  color: red
}
<p class="selector">Main Selector</p>
<p>P tag</p>
<span>span</span>
<span>span</span>
<span>span</span>
<p>P tag</p>
<p>P tag</p>
<span>span</span>
<p>P tag</p>

  • 1
    Could you expand more about the usage of ~ in your answer. Clearly that's a trick I seem to have missed. – Hassan Baig Jul 7 at 18:54
  • @HassanBaig sure check the edit – weegee Jul 7 at 19:11
  • Ah I see the usage. Here's the thing: I need all n textareas to be separately toggle-able, independent of each other. Currently as per your suggested solution, they're all controlled by the same toggle switch, which defeats the purpose. – Hassan Baig Jul 7 at 19:25
  • @HassanBaig edited again. Check the answer – weegee Jul 7 at 19:36
  • 1
    Selected this answer because this is more backward compatible than techniques utilizing summary and details. Having said that, the simplicity of those elements to achieve the desired result can't be overstated. – Hassan Baig Jul 8 at 11:50
2

Why not simply use the details element?

[open] summary {
  position: absolute;
  bottom: -1.5em;
  left: 0;
}

summary::before {
  content: "...More";
}

[open] summary::before {
  content: "Less";
}

details {
  display: inline;
}

.more-text {
  position: relative;
  margin-bottom: 2em;
}
<div class="more-text">
  Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Impedit laborum nesciunt dolorem deleniti non magnam natus iure nobis quaerat amet commodi aspernatur,
  <details>
    <summary></summary>
    ad, maiores possimus fugiat ipsum assumenda cum? Voluptas.
  </details>
</div>
<div class="more-text">
  Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Impedit laborum nesciunt dolorem deleniti non magnam natus iure nobis quaerat amet commodi aspernatur,
  <details>
    <summary></summary>
    ad, maiores possimus fugiat ipsum assumenda cum? Voluptas.
  </details>
</div>
<div class="more-text">
  Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Impedit laborum nesciunt dolorem deleniti non magnam natus iure nobis quaerat amet commodi aspernatur,
  <details>
    <summary></summary>
    ad, maiores possimus fugiat ipsum assumenda cum? Voluptas.
  </details>
</div>
<div class="more-text">
  Lorem ipsum dolor, sit amet consectetur adipisicing elit. Impedit laborum nesciunt dolorem deleniti non magnam natus iure nobis quaerat amet commodi aspernatur,
  <details>
    <summary></summary>
    ad, maiores possimus fugiat ipsum assumenda cum? Voluptas.
  </details>
</div>

If you need legacy browser support, here's a very small polyfill that comes without any dependencies:

https://github.com/rstacruz/details-polyfill

1

Here is a generic idea where the only requirement is to have a different wrapper per text.

I considered CSS grid to be able to put the label before in the DOM then change its position visually. I also made the label and the input on the same row/column having the input on the top to trigger the click. Then I simply create an overflow for the input so we don't see it.

.box {
  display:grid;
  overflow:hidden;
  margin:10px;
}

.box span,input[type="checkbox"] {
  grid-row:1;
  grid-column:1;
  width:100%;
  height:100%;
}
input[type="checkbox"] {
  z-index:2;
  width:300%; /*big value to create the overflow*/
}
/* show/hide the text*/
p {
  display: none;
}
input:checked ~ p {
  display: block;
}
/**/
span {
  color:red;
}

/* Change label text*/
input + span::before {
  content: 'Show ';
}
input:checked + span::before {
  content: 'Hide ';
}
/**/
<div class="box">
  <input type="checkbox" />
  <span>textarea</span>
  <p >This is hidden textarea, that needs to be shown</p>
</div>
<div class="box">
  <input type="checkbox" />
  <span>textarea</span>
  <p >This is hidden textarea, that needs to be shown</p>
</div>
<div class="box">
  <input type="checkbox" />
  <span>textarea</span>
  <p >This is hidden textarea, that needs to be shown</p>
</div>

  • Could you expand on "the only requirement is to have a different wrapper per text"? I'd like to see how you're using that in your sample code, so would be good to add a bit more clarification :-) – Hassan Baig Jul 9 at 7:13
  • @HassanBaig it's the box element in my code. It's the wrapper around the text and the input. Since I am using Grid and order I need to a least have a wrapper per block – Temani Afif Jul 9 at 8:19
  • I'll tell you what I'm confused about. Check out the answer I accepted (the one above yours). We had to resort to using as many CSS classes/IDs as there were text elements on the page. Your solution seems to have side-stepped that, making the code simpler in essence. Is that because of this: input:checked ~ p { display: block; }? – Hassan Baig Jul 9 at 8:23
  • 1
    @HassanBaig this is why I am using a wrapper, to avoid ussing ID/Classes and to have something generic and scalable. the wrapper will isolate each input/text making the work easy. By doing input:checked ~ p { display: block; } I am sure to target only the needed p and not other p element. – Temani Afif Jul 9 at 8:27
  • 1
    @HassanBaig it's important because it allow me to place both label and input on the same grid area and both will cover it fully (width:100% height:100%) then by making the input on the top (z-index:2) it will catch the click and it's like you are clicking on the label but in reality it's the input. And to make sure the input will not be shown, I used a big width for it so it's overflowing. Well, Grid is the most important part in this trick. – Temani Afif Jul 9 at 10:21
1

In order to get the collapse effect you can consider using the html elements: details and summary.

You can add your own CSS as you wish, but you don't have to write the toggle part since it is built in.

Generic example:

<details>
    <summary>Read More</summary>
    More of your content....
</details>

Read more on MDN

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