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I want to allocate memory for a 2D array such that the arrays have increasing incremental memory. This means array[0] can hold 1 uint32_t, array[1] can hold 2 uint32_t, etc. Think of it as a triangle.

I have a function that takes in as a parameter rows the maximum number of variables the final array can hold. So we have rows number of arrays (array[0] to array[rows-1]), holding a number of variables of 1 to rows.

After initialising and allocating memory for the main array, we can use a for loop to initialise then allocate for each sub-array incrementally. We have to do this in two seperate expressions since the incrementer i is inheritally variable.

We should have something like this (I know I didn't free memory but that's not the issue):

#define ROWS 15

int main()
{
    uint32_t** array = triangle2array(FILEPATH, ROWS, DIGITS);
    ...
}

uint32_t** triangle2array(const char* filepath, uint8_t rows, uint8_t digits)
{
    uint32_t** row = (uint32_t**) malloc(rows*sizeof(uint32_t*));
    if (row == NULL) {
        fprintf(stderr, "row memory is not allocated\n");
        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
    }
    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        // Initialise memory for sub-array, i.e. arrays that hold the numbers on a specific row
        uint32_t* row[i];
        row[i] = (uint32_t*) malloc((i+1)*sizeof(uint32_t));
        if (row[i] == NULL) {
            fprintf(stderr, "row[%zi] memory is not allocated\n", i);
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        assert(rows == ROWS);
    }
    return row;
}

It doesn't work. According to a debugger, the argument rows is addressed to 0x00007FFFFFFFDFA4 while row[0] is addressed to 0x00007FFFFFFFDFA0. Essentially, row[0] is addressed 4 bytes before rows and when malloc is allocated, the memory is paved onto rows giving rows a random value.

What's weird is that if I make a mirror function and do essentially the same thing, it works perfectly fine:

#define MACRO 15

void example(uint8_t);

int main(void)
{
    example(MACRO);
    return 0;    
}

void example(uint8_t macro)
{
    uint32_t** row = malloc(macro*sizeof(uint32_t*));
    for (size_t i = 0; i < macro; i++) {
        uint32_t* row[i];
        row[i] = malloc((i+1)*sizeof(uint32_t));
    }
    assert(macro == MACRO);
    free(row);
}

I honestly don't know how to approach this issue.

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  • 2
    You are shadowing the row variable by declaring one more row inside for loop. – kiran Biradar Jul 8 '19 at 13:21
  • @kiranBiradar How do you mean? rows is a number and row is a memory address. – Pradana Aumars Jul 8 '19 at 13:23
  • 1
    uint32_t** row = malloc(macro*sizeof(uint32_t*)); and uint32_t* row[i]; are two different variables with the same name. – kiran Biradar Jul 8 '19 at 13:24
  • 2
    Time to enable those compiler warnings... -Wshadow etc... – Antti Haapala Jul 8 '19 at 13:52
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    for (size_t i = 0; i < rows; i++) {
        // Initialise memory for sub-array, i.e. arrays that hold the numbers on a specific row
        uint32_t* row[i];
        row[i] = (uint32_t*) malloc((i+1)*sizeof(uint32_t));
        if (row[i] == NULL) {
            fprintf(stderr, "row[%zi] memory is not allocated\n", i);
            exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
        }
        assert(rows == ROWS);
    }

Your problem is the line uint32_t* row[i];. I don't know what you intended it to do, but what it actually does is declare a new array named row of size i, local to the body of the for loop. In other words, the following assignment

row[i] = (uint32_t*) malloc((i+1)*sizeof(uint32_t));

does not assign to the dynamic array row you malloced earlier, but out of bounds of this nested array row. Remove the spurious declaration uint32_t* row[i]; and your code should work.

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