1

As you know, on the Internet, examples are given for two collections, which are connected according to several conditions:

var query = from e1 in seq1
                   from e2 in seq2
                   where (e1.Key1 == e2.Key1)
                        && (e1.Key2 == e2.Key2)
                   select new {Data1 = e1.Data, Data2 = e2.Data};

However, when working with MS SQL Server, a similar LINQ construction will turn into a CROSS JOIN in T-SQL. You can easily see this if you convert the result to the ObjectQuery type, and then call the ToTraceString method:

string sql = (query as ObjectQuery) .ToTraceString ();
Console.WriteLine (sql);

Then, for the condition And, when connecting two collections, it is better to use a tuple in the internal connection instead of the Cartesian product from-from LINQ:

var query = from e1 in seq1
                 join e2 in seq2
                 on new {e1.Key1, e1.Key2} equals new {e2.Key1, e2.Key2}
                 select new {Data1 = e1.Data, Data2 = e2.Data};

However, how to do this for the condition OR:

var query = from e1 in seq1
                   from e2 in seq2
                   where (e1.Key1 == e2.Key1)
                           || (e1.Key2 == e2.Key2)
                   select new {Data1 = e1.Data, Data2 = e2.Data};

However, with an internal connection to the left of the equals keyword cannot be e2, but to the right is e1, then you can write as follows:

var query = (from e1 in seq1
                        join e2 in seq2
                        on e1.Key1 equals e2.Key1
                        select new {Data1 = e1.Data, Data2 = e2.Data}).Union (from e1 in seq1
                                      join e2 in seq2
                                      on e1.Key2 equals e2.Key2
                                      select new {Data1 = e1.Data, Data2 = e2.Data});

Yes, requests generally turn out to be nonequivalent, taking into account that full duplicates of rows can be returned. However, in real life, full duplicate lines are not needed and they are trying to get rid of them. Is it possible to write the last query more optimally both in performance and in perception of the code? Examples of bad solutions for LINQ queries to MS SQL Server: http://qaru.site/questions/2444051/greater-than-with-multiple-conditions-in-linq-join and http://qaru.site/questions/231459/linq-left-join-on-multiple-or-conditions

Plans:

1) for CROSS JOIN, the average lead time is 195 seconds: enter image description here

2) for INNER JOIN-UNION, on average, the execution time is less than 1 second: enter image description here

Amendment. After all the tests, it turned out that AND gives INNER JOIN, and OR gives CROSS JOIN

  • 1
    There's no obvious reason why you shouldn't use the query that generates a CROSS JOIN. – David Browne - Microsoft Jul 8 '19 at 19:01
  • The problem is when the tables are large – Evgeniy Gribkov Jul 8 '19 at 19:08
  • 4
    But CROSS JOIN isn't a problem per se. SQL Server won't compute the entire Cartesian product before applying the filters. – David Browne - Microsoft Jul 8 '19 at 19:32
  • Alas, as the measurements showed, the RAM for such requests is allocated such as if a Cartesian product occurs there before applying filters – Evgeniy Gribkov Jul 8 '19 at 19:51
  • 1
    SQL Server will allocate memory to store all the data you read from disk, up to its configured limit, or until the computer is low on physical memory. And the query may be very expensive, but changing it from a CROSS JOIN to some other kind of join isn't really going to help. – David Browne - Microsoft Jul 8 '19 at 19:58

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.