5

I have a question, if I can use useState generic in React Hooks, just like I can do this in React Components while managing multiple states?

state = {
  input1: "",
  input2: "",
  input3: ""
  // .. more states
};

handleChange = (event) => {
  const { name, value } = event.target;
  this.setState({
    [name]: value,
  });
};
3
  • Do you mean doing this with state variables? If you are using more complex state then obviously this can be done similar to how it's done in your class component example. For the former, see my answer which demonstrates the ability to set variable state in a dynamically.
    – James
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:39
  • @ravibagul91 not necessarily, you can manage complex state with useState
    – James
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:40
  • @James Yeah, that's what I'm looking for. I'll delve into your linked answer
    – Mateusz
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:48
10

Yes, with hooks you can manage complex state (without 3rd party library) in three ways, where the main reasoning is managing state ids and their corresponding elements.

  1. Manage a single object with multiple states (notice that an array is an object).
  2. Use useReducer if (1) is too complex.
  3. Use multiple useState for every key-value pair (consider the readability and maintenance of it).

Check out this:

// Ids-values pairs.
const complexStateInitial = {
  input1: "",
  input2: "",
  input3: ""
  // .. more states
};

function reducer(state, action) {
  return { ...state, [action.type]: action.value };
}

export default function App() {
  const [fromUseState, setState] = useState(complexStateInitial);

  // handle generic state from useState
  const onChangeUseState = (e) => {
    const { name, value } = e.target;
    setState((prevState) => ({ ...prevState, [name]: value }));
  };

  const [fromReducer, dispatch] = useReducer(reducer, complexStateInitial);

  // handle generic state from useReducer
  const onChangeUseReducer = (e) => {
    const { name, value } = e.target;
    dispatch({ type: name, value });
  };
 
  return (
    <>
      <h3>useState</h3>
      <div>
        {Object.entries(fromUseState).map(([key, value]) => (
          <input
            key={key}
            name={key}
            value={value}
            onChange={onChangeUseState}
          />
        ))}
        <pre>{JSON.stringify(fromUseState, null, 2)}</pre>
      </div>

      <h3>useReducer</h3>
      <div>
        {Object.entries(fromReducer).map(([key, value]) => (
          <input
            name={key}
            key={key}
            value={value}
            onChange={onChangeUseReducer}
          />
        ))}
        <pre>{JSON.stringify(fromReducer, null, 2)}</pre>
      </div>
    </>
  );
}

Edit Handle Multiple State

Notes

  • Unlike the setState method found in class components, useState does not automatically merge update objects. You can replicate this behavior by combining the function updater form with object spread syntax:
setState(prevState => {
  // Object.assign would also work
  return {...prevState, ...updatedValues};
});

Refer to React Docs.

15
  • This does not use react hooks.
    – Dov Rine
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:37
  • This is correct, but not the way to do it using react hooks. Jul 9 '19 at 10:37
  • 1
    setState comes from useState: const [state, setState] = useState(initialState); Jul 9 '19 at 10:42
  • 1
    @DennisVash: I apologize. You are correct. I didn't see your setState declaration and assumed that it was the same class setState method that OP seemed to be asking about. The confusion for me was your use of the same method name.
    – Dov Rine
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:43
  • 1
    @James: Not trying to be presumptuous. I think we actually agree. Your custom hook answer will ultimately probably be the answer OP is looking for.
    – Dov Rine
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:55
3

The correct way to do what you're trying to do is to create your own hook that uses useState internally.

Here is an example:

// This is your generic reusable hook.
const useHandleChange = (initial) => {
  const [value, setValue] = React.useState(initial);
  const handleChange = React.useCallback(
    (event) => setValue(event.target.value), // This is the meaty part.
    []
  );
  return [value, handleChange];
}

const App = () => {
  // Here we use the hook 3 times to show it's reusable.
  const [value1, handle1] = useHandleChange('one');
  const [value2, handle2] = useHandleChange('two');
  const [value3, handle3] = useHandleChange('three');
  return <div>
    <div>
      <input onChange={handle1} value={value1} />
      <input onChange={handle2} value={value2} />
      <input onChange={handle3} value={value3} />
    </div>
    <h2>States:</h2>
    <ul>
      <li>{value1}</li>
      <li>{value2}</li>
      <li>{value3}</li>
    </ul>
  </div>
}

ReactDOM.render(<App />, document.querySelector("#app"))
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react/16.8.6/umd/react.production.min.js"></script>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/react-dom/16.8.6/umd/react-dom.production.min.js"></script>
<div id="app"></div>

Note the use of React.useCallback to stop your hook from returning a new handler function on every render. (We don't need to specify setValue as a dependency because React guarantees that it will never change)

-3

I didn't actually test this, but it should work.

See https://reactjs.org/docs/hooks-reference.html#usestate for more info.

import React, {useState} from 'react';

const MyComponent = () => {
    const [name, setName] = useState('Default value for name');
    return (<div><button onClick={()=>setName('John Doe')}}>Set Name</button></div>);
};
export default MyComponent;
1
  • 6
    I don't see how this answers the question? You've just given an example of how to use setState, how does the OP deduce from this how to set it dynamically?
    – James
    Jul 9 '19 at 10:43

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