4

The time complexity of this question differs from a similar question that's been asked. This is a question from Zauba developer hiring challenge (event ended a month ago):

f(0) = p
f(1) = q
f(2) = r

for n > 2

f(n) = a*f(n-1) + b*f(n-2) + c*f(n-3) + g(n)

where g(n) = n*n*(n+1)

p, q, r, a, b, c, n are given. n can be as large as 10^18.

Link to a similar problem

In the above link, the time complexity was not specified and I have already solved this problem in O(n), the pseudocode is below (just an approach, all the possible boundaries, and edge cases were handled in the contest).

if(n == 0) return p;
if(n == 1) return q;
if(n == 2) return r;
for(long i=3;i<=n;i++){
    now = a*r + b*q + c*p + i*i*(i+1);
    p = q; q = r; r = now;
}

Please note that I have used modulo 10^9 + 7 wherever appropriate in the original code to handle overflows, handled appropriate edge cases wherever necessary and I have used java long data type (if it helps).

But since this still requires O(n) time, I am expecting a better solution which can handle n ~ 10^18.

EDIT

As user גלעד ברקן mentioned about its relation to matrix exponentiation, I have tried to do this and stuck at a particular point, where I am not sure what to place in the 4th row, 3rd col of the matrix. Kindly make any suggestions and corrections.

| a b c  1? |   | f(n) |        | f(n+1) |
| 1 0 0  0  |   |f(n-1)|        |  f(n)  |
| 0 1 0  0  |   |f(n-2)|    =>  | f(n-1) |
| 0 0 ?! 0  |   | g(n) |        | g(n+1) |

    M               A               B
  • What makes you think that this can be done in sublinear time? – NPE Jul 9 at 19:51
  • @NPE It was mentioned in the constraints that N can 10^18, but I tried with the above mentioned approach and got 11/50 ( 3 out of 10-12 test cases). – YouKnowWhoIAm Jul 9 at 20:03
  • I could be missing something, but it looks like your f(n-1)/f(n-2)/f(n-3) updates are incorrect. It looks like it should be p = q; q = r; r = now; Is it possible that you used the wrong equation in your submission (which would account for getting only 3 cases correct (n=0,1, and 2))? – Slater Jul 9 at 20:21
  • Update to my last comment, even if I'm right, your algorithm should give the right value for n=3, so without seeing the test cases I'm not sure my question fully answers things. It still appears to me that there's a bug in that line. – Slater Jul 9 at 20:27
  • 1
    Could it be related to matrix exponentiation? – גלעד ברקן Jul 10 at 2:39
8

Matrix exponentiation is indeed the right way to go, but there's a little more work to be done.

Since g(n) is not constant-valued, there is no way to apply matrix exponentiation efficiently (O(log n) instead of O(n)) to the recurrence relation in its current form.


A similar recurrence relation needs to be found for g(n) with only a constant term trailing. Since g(n) is cubic, 3 recursive terms are required:

g(n) = x*g(n-1) + y*g(n-2) + z*g(n-3) + w

Expand the cubic expressions for each of them:

n³ + n² = x(n³-2n²+n) + y(n³-5n²+8n-4) + z*(n³-8n²+21n-18) + w

        = n³(x+y+z) + n²(-2x-5y-8z) + n(x+8y+21z) + (w-4y-18z)

Match the coefficients to obtain three simultaneous equations for x, y, z plus another to calculate w:

  x +  y +   z = 1
-2x - 5y -  8z = 1
  x + 8y + 21z = 0
  w - 4y - 18z = 0

Solve them to obtain:

x = 3    y = -3    z = 1    w = 6

Conveniently, these coefficients are also integers*, which means modular arithmetic can be directly performed on the recurrence.

* I doubt this was a coincidence - it could well have been the intention of the hiring examiner.

The matrix recurrence equation is therefore:

|  a  b  c  1  0  0  0 |   | f(n-1) |   |   f(n) |
|  1  0  0  0  0  0  0 |   | f(n-2) |   | f(n-1) |
|  0  1  0  0  0  0  0 |   | f(n-3) |   | f(n-2) |
|  0  0  0  3 -3  1  6 | x |   g(n) | = | g(n+1) |
|  0  0  0  1  0  0  0 |   | g(n-1) |   |   g(n) |
|  0  0  0  0  1  0  0 |   | g(n-2) |   | g(n-1) |
|  0  0  0  0  0  0  1 |   |      1 |   |      1 |

The final matrix exponentiation equation is:

                        [n-2]
|  a  b  c  1  0  0  0 |       | f(2) |   |   f(n) |        | f(2) |   |  r |
|  1  0  0  0  0  0  0 |       | f(1) |   | f(n-1) |        | f(1) |   |  q |
|  0  1  0  0  0  0  0 |       | f(0) |   | f(n-2) |        | f(0) |   |  p |
|  0  0  0  3 -3  1  6 |   x   | g(3) | = | g(n+1) |   ,    | g(3) | = | 36 |
|  0  0  0  1  0  0  0 |       | g(2) |   |   g(n) |        | g(2) |   | 12 |
|  0  0  0  0  1  0  0 |       | g(1) |   | g(n-1) |        | g(1) |   |  2 |
|  0  0  0  0  0  0  1 |       |  1   |   |      1 |        |  1   |   |  1 |

(Every operation is implicitly modulo 10^9 + 7 or whichever such number is supplied.)


Note that Java's % operator is the remainder, which is different to the modulus for negative numbers. Example:

-1 % 5 == -1     // Java
-1 = 4 (mod 5)   // mathematical modulus

The workaround is rather simple:

long mod(long b, long a)
{
    // computes a mod b
    // assumes that b is positive
    return (b + (a % b)) % b;
}

The original iterative algorithm:

long recurrence_original(
    long a, long b, long c,
    long p, long q, long r,
    long n, long m // 10^9 + 7 or whatever
) {
    // base cases
    if (n == 0) return p;
    if (n == 1) return q;
    if (n == 2) return r;

    long f0, f1, f2;
    f0 = p; f1 = q; f2 = r;
    for (long i = 3; i <= n; i++) {
        long f3 = mod(m,
            mod(m, a*f2) + mod(m, b*f1) + mod(m, c*f0) +
            mod(m, mod(m, i) * mod(m, i)) * mod(m, i+1)
        );
        f0 = f1; f1 = f2; f2 = f3;
    }
    return f2;
}

Modulo matrix functions:

long[][] matrix_create(int n)
{
    return new long[n][n];
}

void matrix_multiply(int n, long m, long[][] c, long[][] a, long[][] b)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++) {
            long s = 0;
            for (int k = 0; k < n; k++)
                s = mod(m, s + mod(m, a[i][k]*b[k][j]));
            c[i][j] = s;
        }
    }
}

void matrix_pow(int n, long m, long p, long[][] y, long[][] x)
{
    // swap matrices
    long[][] a = matrix_create(n);
    long[][] b = matrix_create(n);
    long[][] c = matrix_create(n);

    // initialize accumulator to identity
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        a[i][i] = 1;

    // initialize base to original matrix
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            b[i][j] = x[i][j];

    // exponentiation by squaring
    // there are better algorithms, but this is the easiest to implement
    // and is still O(log n)
    long[][] t = null;
    for (long s = p; s > 0; s /= 2) {
        if (s % 2 == 1) {
            matrix_multiply(n, m, c, a, b);
            t = c; c = a; a = t;
        }
        matrix_multiply(n, m, c, b, b);
        t = c; c = b; b = t;
    }

    // write to output
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
            y[i][j] = a[i][j];
}

And finally, the new algorithm itself:

long recurrence_matrix(
    long a, long b, long c,
    long p, long q, long r,
    long n, long m
) {
    if (n == 0) return p;
    if (n == 1) return q;
    if (n == 2) return r;

    // original recurrence matrix
    long[][] mat = matrix_create(7);
    mat[0][0] = a; mat[0][1] = b; mat[0][2] = c; mat[0][3] = 1;
    mat[1][0] = 1; mat[2][1] = 1;
    mat[3][3] = 3; mat[3][4] = -3; mat[3][5] = 1; mat[3][6] = 6;
    mat[4][3] = 1; mat[5][4] = 1;
    mat[6][6] = 1;

    // exponentiate
    long[][] res = matrix_create(7);
    matrix_pow(7, m, n - 2, res, mat);

    // multiply the first row with the initial vector
    return mod(m, mod(m, res[0][6])
        + mod(m, res[0][0]*r)  + mod(m, res[0][1]*q)  + mod(m, res[0][2]*p)
        + mod(m, res[0][3]*36) + mod(m, res[0][4]*12) + mod(m, res[0][5]*2)
    );
}

Here are some sample benchmarks for both algorithms above.

  • Original iterative algorithm:

    n       time (μs)
    -------------------
    10^1    9.3
    10^2    44.9
    10^3    401.501
    10^4    3882.099
    10^5    27940.9
    10^6    88873.599
    10^7    877100.5
    10^8    9057329.099
    10^9    91749994.4
    
  • New matrix algorithm:

    n       time (μs)
    ------------------
    10^1    69.168
    10^2    128.771
    10^3    212.697
    10^4    258.385
    10^5    318.195
    10^6    380.9
    10^7    453.487
    10^8    560.428
    10^9    619.835
    10^10   652.344
    10^11   750.518
    10^12   769.901
    10^13   851.845
    10^14   934.915
    10^15   1016.732
    10^16   1079.613
    10^17   1123.413
    10^18   1225.323
    

The old algorithm took over 90 seconds to calculate n = 10^9, whereas the new algorithm accomplished it in just over 0.6 milliseconds (a 150,000x speed-up)!

The original algorithm's time complexity was evidently linear (as expected); n = 10^10 took too long to complete so I didn't continue.

The new algorithm's time complexity was evidently logarithmic - doubling the order-of-magnitude of n led to the execution time doubling (again, as expected due to exponentiation-by-squaring).

For "small" values of n (< 100) the overhead of matrix allocation and operations overshadowed the algorithm itself, but quickly became insignificant as n increased.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.