1

I have an array of objects and I am iterating through the array with an async forEach loop and making an HTTP get request with Axios. I tell the compiler to wait for axios to finish before proceeding, but for some reason console.log(data) still runs before console.log(ret)

I think this might be because the forEach loop just gets skipped as soomn as it hits the await and continues, but I don't know how to fix this issue

data.forEach(async (e, i) => {
    let req = `https://api.darksky.net/forecast/7e12d816d7818a03901fa6a72e6802f5/${e.lat},${e.log},${Math.floor(e.start_time / 1000)}?units=si`
    let ret = await axios(req)
    console.log(ret)
    data[i]['weather'] = ret.data.currently.summary
    data[i]['cloudCover'] = ret.data.currently.cloudCover
})

console.log(data)

Here is the output that I see (Note that the first array should theoretically have 'weather' and 'cloudCover' attributes, since they are appended)

[ { start_time: 1548952405372,
    end_time: 1548953096266,
    lat: 59.57644286,
    log: 20.16817143 },
  { start_time: 1548958463054,
    end_time: 1548959597889,
    lat: 59.57644286,
    log: 20.16817143 },
  { start_time: 1548964774667,
    end_time: 1548966048587,
    lat: 59.57644286,
    log: 20.16817143 } ]

{ status: 200,
  statusText: 'OK',
  headers: 
   { date: 'Wed, 10 Jul 2019 02:57:13 GMT',
     'content-type': 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
     'content-length': '10354',
     connection: 'close',
     'x-authentication-time': '705ms',
     'x-forecast-api-calls': '13',
     'cache-control': 'max-age=86400',
2
  • If you want to sequence your async calls to be one at a time sequenced after each other, replace your .forEach() loop with a regular for loop. .forEach() is not async aware so it doesn't not wait for your callback to resolve it's promise before going on to the next iteration. A regular for loop will wait.
    – jfriend00
    Jul 10 '19 at 5:24
5

forEach, in fact, doesn't wait for anything: you've given it an async function so it can schedule a start call for that and immediately move on to the next function because there is nothing to wait for: as an async function, its return value is a Promise, not real data.

If you want to wait until all your async functions are done, then you'll have to use Promise.all:

async runThisStuff() {
  await Promise.all(data.map(async (e, i) => {
    let url = `...`
    let ret = await axios(url);
    console.log(ret)
    data[i]['weather'] = ret.data.currently.summary
    data[i]['cloudCover'] = ret.data.currently.cloudCover
  });

  console.log(data);
}

If you want to do this in global context, you can't await Promise.all (because you can only await inside an async function), and you'll have to use the normal promise then:

Promise.all(
  data.map(async(...) => { ... })
).then(() => {
  console.log(data)
});
1
  • Yes I agree with Mike. Your foreach does not actually wait for anything. Jul 10 '19 at 3:21
0

All you need to do is using Promise.all and Array.map. it will wait all promises to be done. see below.

const newData = await Promise.all(data.map(async(e, i) => {
    let req = `https://api.darksky.net/forecast/7e12d816d7818a03901fa6a72e6802f5/${e.lat},${e.log},${Math.floor(e.start_time / 1000)}?units=si`;
    let ret = await axios(req);
    console.log(ret);
    e.weather = ret.data.currently.summary;
    e.cloudCover = ret.data.currently.cloudCover;

    return e;
}));

console.log(newData);
0

The forEach method makes multiple function calls without waiting for anything regardless of what goes on inside these functions.

The flow inside the functions are effected by await - but forEach itself is not.

Use for-in loop for synchronous remote requests.

async function makeCalls() {

    console.log('starting');

    for (d in data) {

       let req = `https://api.darksky.net/forecast/7e12d816d7818a03901fa6a72e6802f5/${e.lat},${e.log},${Math.floor(e.start_time / 1000)}?units=si`

       let ret = await axios(req)

       console.log(ret)

       d['weather'] = ret.data.currently.summary
       d['cloudCover'] = ret.data.currently.cloudCover
    }

    console.log('ending');


}
0

forEach is actually synchronous. It takes a callback function as parameter, which in this case is your ASYNC function. So strictly speaking, all the codes were executed but at a different time than you expected them to. None was skipped.

Async/await is just syntactic sugar for Promise. That means that every line of code after "await" in your loop is only executed when the promised is resolved.

A better way to do this could be promise.All() like others have suggested.

0

you can use for of:

const foo = async () => {
  const arr = [1,2,3,4,5,6];
  for (let i of arr) {
  	const response = await // async operations
  }
}

foo();

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