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i basically populated a datatable with names and now i am trying to select the distinct names and putting them in a list but it is giving me the error in the title when i try to convert my linq query to list. I already put in system.Linq

List<string> ItemNames = new List<string>();
var query1 = from r in DT.AsEnumerable()
            group r by r.Field<string>("Name") into r
           select r; // I also tried select r.ToList();

ItemNames = query1.ToList<string>();

How can i fix this problem??

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    using System.Linq;?
    – Johnny
    Jul 10, 2019 at 9:29
  • @Johnny yup that is included already i checked
    – wren
    Jul 10, 2019 at 9:30
  • 3
  • 2
    You're trying top convert a row from the table into a List<string>. What happens if you omit "<string>"? (it need to be a List<Row> whatever Row is)
    – Steve Todd
    Jul 10, 2019 at 9:32
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    Usually, you omit the generic type when you call the extension method .ToList(), like @SteveTodd said. It will be inferred by the C# compiler. Sometimes, however, you can take advantage of the covariance of the IEnumerable<out T> interface (since C# 4.0 from 2010). For example, if you have an IEnumerable<Giraffe>, and if a Giraffe is an Animal (reference types), then you can do giraffes.ToList<Animal>(); because by the covariance, an IEnumerable<Giraffe> is an IEnumerable<Animal>. But your case is a compile-time error since a List<DataRow> is not a string. Jul 10, 2019 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

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I assume that DT is a DataTable.

You Error is:

'IEnumerable < IGrouping< string, DataRow > >' does not contain a definition for 'ToList'

You basically are trying to put a complex object into a string:

IGrouping<string, DataRow> myGrouping = null;
string s = myGrouping; // This won't work

You have to Select what strings you want to see in your List<string>:

List<string> ItemNames = new List<string>();
var query1 = from r in new DataTable().AsEnumerable()
             group r by r.Field<string>("Name") into r
             select r; // I also tried select r.ToList();

ItemNames = query1.Select(s => s.Key).ToList<string>();
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How about:

List<string> ItemNames = DT.AsEnumerable()
    .Select(ro => ro["Name"].ToString()) //pull the name out of the datarow, projecting an enumerable of the names. Remember that ro is a DataRow, and ro["Name"] is an object hence the ToString (could also have cast)
    .Distinct()                          //reduce to just distinct names
    .ToList();                           //turn it to a list

Here we pull all the names, then use Distinct() to distinct them, rather than forming a grouping - I think this will be less resource intensive than tracking the key and the associated rows

As to what went wrong with your original, you were misunderstanding how a grouping works. This here will create something a bit like a Dictionary<string, List<DataRow>>():

from r in DT.AsEnumerable()
group r by r.Field<string>("Name") into rr

Every unique name in the table becomes the dictionary key. And then every row that has that same name goes into the dictionary value (a list of datarows). When you said:

select rr; //you said r, but i renamed it to rr to make it more clear what is going on, this is a new object unrelated to your original r

rr is the value of the dictionary item; it is a List of all DataRows that have the same name. Could be one item in that list, could be thousands. It is NOT the name of the person that went into the Key of the Grouping. It is the value of the Grouping; the value of the grouping is a List<DataRow> that all have the same name and are hence stored under one key. If it were a Dictionary<string, List<DataRow>>:

List<DataRow> allPeopleCalledJohn = myDictionary["John"];

You could have selected the key, or pulled the name out of the first row in the list

i.e. You could have:

List<string> ItemNames = new List<string>();
var query1 = from r in new DataTable().AsEnumerable()
             group r by r.Field<string>("Name") into rr
             select rr.Key; //its the key of the grouping, i.e. the name

ItemNames = query1.ToList<string>();

Or even:

List<string> ItemNames = new List<string>();
var query1 = from r in new DataTable().AsEnumerable()
             group r by r.Field<string>("Name") into rr
             select rr.First().Field<string>("Name"); //its the name of the first DataRow indexed by the grouping

ItemNames = query1.ToList<string>();

But why I don't suggest these is it's a pointless waste of resources to ask LINQ to go to the effort of making a grouping set, and tracking every datarow back to the name it holds, when all you want is the name itself. Instead if you pull just the names out, distinct them, and list them, then you can ditch the rest of the row data at the first step rather than carrying it to the end then throwing it away

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