1

Is it possible to have a trait be a singleton?

What I am trying to achieve is to have a clean and lightweight API I can extend throughout my application like the following:

trait SingletonTrait {
  // element I wish to be unique throughout my application
  val singletonElement = ///

  ...
}

// uses *singletonElement*
object MainApplication extends SingletonTrait {
  ...
}

// uses *singletonElement*
class SomeClass(...) extends SingletonTrait {
  ...
}

In the same idea implied by a getOrCreate() function that would retrieve an existing instance of an element if one already exists or creates it otherwise.

  • What is wrong with a good old-fashioned object with a lazy val? – Tim Jul 10 at 13:33
  • 1
    If it is a Singleton why do you need to inject it with a trait. Why not simply define an object and call it directly when you need it? - (PS: Take into a account, that there are good reasons why the Singleton is an infamous pattern, like difficulty for testing and high cohesion). – Luis Miguel Mejía Suárez Jul 10 at 13:34
  • @LuisMiguelMejíaSuárez @Tim I feel the ability to extend a trait is a nice feature. – wipman Jul 10 at 13:59
  • @wipman why exactly? I can only see a reason. And it would be making the Singleton "private". Thus, only accessible to values that extends the trait. But, even if I do think that is useful. Technically speaking, that wouldn't be a Singleton in the formal sense. – Luis Miguel Mejía Suárez Jul 10 at 14:02
  • @LuisMiguelMejíaSuárez Yes: a library of features with a shared state accessible only to some components of an application. – wipman Jul 10 at 14:17
3

Technically you could do this like so

object SingletonElement {
  var count = 0
}

trait SingletonTrait {
  final val singletonElement = SingletonElement
}

object MainApplication extends SingletonTrait {
  singletonElement.count = singletonElement.count + 1
}

class SomeClass extends SingletonTrait {
  singletonElement.count = singletonElement.count + 1
}

We can test that the same object is used like so

new SomeClass
MainApplication
SingletonElement.count

which should output

res2: Int = 2

which shows the same SingletonElement was used.

5

Maybe just create value in companion object and reference it in trait?

trait SingletonTrait {
  final lazy val singletonElement = SingletonTrait.SingletonElement
}

object SingletonTrait {
  lazy val SingletonElement = {
    println("Creating singleton element!")
    "singleton element"
  }
}

// uses *singletonElement*
class SomeClass() extends SingletonTrait {
    println(s"Using ${singletonElement} in class.")
}

new SomeClass()
new SomeClass()
new SomeClass()

It prints:

Creating singleton element!
Using singleton element in class.
Using singleton element in class.
Using singleton element in class.
  • No point making it lazy in the companion object and not in the trait :) In fact, I'd make the trait member a final def to avoid wasting memory. – Alexey Romanov Jul 10 at 17:36
  • This is a trait that self-references? How can this actually function? Could you share some insights, please? I can have any type for SingletonElement? – wipman Jul 13 at 21:26
  • SingletonTrait has companion object (which is always singleton), which holds the instance of SingletonElement, which is then referenced in trait. – Krzysztof Atłasik Jul 14 at 6:05

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