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I am currently using a loop to iterate values into a process (neighbors) in Tcl.

for {set i 0} {$i < $val(nn)} {incr i} {
    for {set j 0} {$j < $val(nn)} {incr j} {
        $ns at 0.0 "neighbors $node($i) $node($j) $i $j"
    }
}

The above allows all the values I need to go into the process. However, inside the process some values are assigned (to a list) and no longer needed to be looped through. A brief snippet from the process:

} else {
    puts "..... Do nothing ....  $nd1 - $nd2"
    if {([lsearch -exact $heads $nd1] != -1) || ([lsearch -exact $members $nd1] != -1) } { 
        incr $nd1 
    }
}

This is the end of a loop in the process. The puts is just a marker, but it checks if an item is contained in either of 2 two lists. If it is in either list, increment it, and move on the next possible value. That value needs to no longer be checked/looped through because it has already been put inside a list.

How do I prevent the value from continuing to be used? The 'process calling' loop will ALWAYS override what happens in the process, so even assigned values will continue to be used. Is there a different way to call processes in Tcl? Or at least, a different way to feed values to a process in Tcl? Or I guess, pull them out?

As a note, here is my process that I want to feed to (n1 and n2 are memory locations, nd1 nd2 are actual number identifiers)

set heads {}
set members {}


proc neighbors {n1 n2 nd1 nd2} {
global heads members bool allNodes 
    puts "Members --- $members"
    puts "heads --- $heads"
    if {([lsearch -exact $heads $nd1] == -1) && ([lsearch -exact $members $nd1] == -1) } { 
        lappend heads $nd1
        set currentHead $n1
        puts "Current Head: $currentHead $n1 $nd1"
    } else {
        puts "..... Do nothing ....  $nd1 - $nd2"
        if {$nd1 in $heads || $nd1 in $members} then return
#here I want it to go to the next nd1 value and NEVER use it again if it 
#has already been processed 
    }
#Otherwise, do neighbor test with nd2 

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  • Would the neighbors proc be able access the heads and members lists? Jul 10 '19 at 16:23
  • @glennjackman Yes, I create the lists outside the neighbors proc too. Before the loops begin inside neighbors is in the new edit. I am able see every update on the lists - the reason for the puts.
    – Sam Dean
    Jul 10 '19 at 16:30
  • I can't remember what version of Tcl is used in NS-2; it's the only known remaining user of OTcl, a defunct object system that's been superseded by both XOTcl and TclOO (in very different ways). Jul 10 '19 at 19:50
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If the neighbors operation is symmetric (often true), you do the check of everything against everything else like this:

for {set i 0} {$i < $val(nn)} {incr i} {
    for {set j $i} {$j < $val(nn)} {incr j} {
        $ns at 0.0 [list neighbors $node($i) $node($j) $i $j]
    }
}

with the inner loop starting at $i (or [expr {$i - 1}] if you don't want to check things against themselves) instead of zero. This ensures that $j is always not less than $i, effectively (approximately) halving the amount of work you need to do. (Style point: it's considered good style to use [list ...] to prepare code for later execution, and not "..."; the former is more efficient, and the latter has some ugly cases when working with values that may have spaces in.)

What you can't do (at least not easily; there might be a method to do it) is use the result of the neighbors operation to stop future calls to neighbors from happening, as you've already scheduled them to occur by the time any of them can possibly express an opinion. It's probably easier in your case to keep a state variable and check against it for the option to do an early reject. That's a fundamental limitation of using delayed command invocation instead of direct: passing values back to do things like skipping future iterations is quite difficult (and downright tricky before Tcl 8.6; that has coroutine which simplifies the task a lot).

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  • Hmm thank you Donal - from what you are saying the 2nd paragraph, I think I'll have to split it into 2 procedures only passing valid items on to the second.
    – Sam Dean
    Jul 11 '19 at 12:54
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It feels like you want to do this:

proc neighbors {n1 n2 nd1 nd2} {
    global heads members bool allNodes 
    if {$nd1 in $heads || $nd2 in $members} then return
    ... do the neighborly stuff ...
}

See https://tcl.tk/man/tcl8.6/TclCmd/expr.htm#M15 for the in operator.

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  • appreciate the answers. I do think the in and ni options are better for the testing test part. The return is also keeping me in the correct loop. However, it still does not solve the fact that the outside loop calling the process continually adds and calculates on nd1 values that have already been processed/assigned to a head or member. I added a little extra code up top to try to better show what I am trying to do.
    – Sam Dean
    Jul 10 '19 at 17:00

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