117

I'm working on a money input screen and need to implement a custom init to set a state variable based on the initialized amount.

I thought this would work, but I'm getting a compiler error of:

Cannot assign value of type 'Binding<Double>' to type 'Double'

struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    @State var includeDecimal = false

    init(amount: Binding<Double>) {
        self.amount = amount
        self.includeDecimal = round(amount)-amount > 0
    }
    ...
}
0
185

Argh! You were so close. This is how you do it. You missed a dollar sign (beta 3) or underscore (beta 4), and either self in front of your amount property, or .value after the amount parameter. All these options work:

You'll see that I removed the @Statein includeDecimal, check the explanation at the end.

This is using the property (put self in front of it):

struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    private var includeDecimal = false

    init(amount: Binding<Double>) {

        // self.$amount = amount // beta 3
        self._amount = amount // beta 4

        self.includeDecimal = round(self.amount)-self.amount > 0
    }
}

or using .value after (but without self, because you are using the passed parameter, not the struct's property):

struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    private var includeDecimal = false

    init(amount: Binding<Double>) {
        // self.$amount = amount // beta 3
        self._amount = amount // beta 4

        self.includeDecimal = round(amount.value)-amount.value > 0
    }
}

This is the same, but we use different names for the parameter (withAmount) and the property (amount), so you clearly see when you are using each.

struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    private var includeDecimal = false

    init(withAmount: Binding<Double>) {
        // self.$amount = withAmount // beta 3
        self._amount = withAmount // beta 4

        self.includeDecimal = round(self.amount)-self.amount > 0
    }
}
struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    private var includeDecimal = false

    init(withAmount: Binding<Double>) {
        // self.$amount = withAmount // beta 3
        self._amount = withAmount // beta 4

        self.includeDecimal = round(withAmount.value)-withAmount.value > 0
    }
}

Note that .value is not necessary with the property, thanks to the property wrapper (@Binding), which creates the accessors that makes the .value unnecessary. However, with the parameter, there is not such thing and you have to do it explicitly. If you would like to learn more about property wrappers, check the WWDC session 415 - Modern Swift API Design and jump to 23:12.

As you discovered, modifying the @State variable from the initilizer will throw the following error: Thread 1: Fatal error: Accessing State outside View.body. To avoid it, you should either remove the @State. Which makes sense because includeDecimal is not a source of truth. Its value is derived from amount. By removing @State, however, includeDecimal will not update if amount changes. To achieve that, the best option, is to define your includeDecimal as a computed property, so that its value is derived from the source of truth (amount). This way, whenever the amount changes, your includeDecimal does too. If your view depends on includeDecimal, it should update when it changes:

struct AmountView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    private var includeDecimal: Bool {
        return round(amount)-amount > 0
    }

    init(withAmount: Binding<Double>) {
        self.$amount = withAmount
    }

    var body: some View { ... }
}

As indicated by rob mayoff, you can also use $$varName (beta 3), or _varName (beta4) to initialise a State variable:

// Beta 3:
$$includeDecimal = State(initialValue: (round(amount.value) - amount.value) != 0)

// Beta 4:
_includeDecimal = State(initialValue: (round(amount.value) - amount.value) != 0)
9
  • Thanks! This helped a lot! I am getting a runtime error on self.includeDecimal = round(self.amount)-self.amount > 0 of Thread 1: Fatal error: Accessing State<Bool> outside View.body – keegan3d Jul 10 '19 at 19:37
  • Well, it kind of makes sense. @State variables should represent a source of truth. But in your case you are duplicating that truth, because the value of includeDecimal can be derived from your actual source of truth that is amount. You have two options: 1. You make includeDecimal a private var (no @State), or even better 2. You make it a computed property that derives its value from amount. This way, if amount changes, includeDecimal does too. You should declare it like this: private var includeDecimal: Bool { return round(amount)-amount > 0 } and remove the self.includeDecimal = ... – kontiki Jul 10 '19 at 20:05
  • Hmm, I need to be able to change includeDecimal so need it as a @State variable in the view. I really just want to initialize it with a starting value – keegan3d Jul 10 '19 at 21:23
  • 1
    @Let's_Create I watched them fully only once, but thanks god for the forwards button ;-) – kontiki Jul 18 '19 at 6:14
  • 1
    Really nice explanation, thanks. I think now the .value has been replaced with .wrappedValue, would be nice to update the answer and remove beta options. – user1046037 Dec 12 '19 at 5:12
11

You said (in a comment) “I need to be able to change includeDecimal”. What does it mean to change includeDecimal? You apparently want to initialize it based on whether amount (at initialization time) is an integer. Okay. So what happens if includeDecimal is false and then later you change it to true? Are you going to somehow force amount to then be non-integer?

Anyway, you can't modify includeDecimal in init. But you can initialize it in init, like this:

struct ContentView : View {
    @Binding var amount: Double

    init(amount: Binding<Double>) {
        $amount = amount
        $$includeDecimal = State(initialValue: (round(amount.value) - amount.value) != 0)
    }

    @State private var includeDecimal: Bool

(Note that at some point the $$includeDecimal syntax will be changed to _includeDecimal.)

0
4

Since it's mid of 2020, let's recap:

As to @Binding amount

  1. _amount is only recommended to be used during initialization. And never assign like this way self.$amount = xxx during initialization

  2. amount.wrappedValue and amount.projectedValue are not frequently used, but you can see cases like

@Environment(\.presentationMode) var presentationMode

self.presentationMode.wrappedValue.dismiss()
  1. A common use case of @binding is:
@Binding var showFavorited: Bool

Toggle(isOn: $showFavorited) {
    Text("Change filter")
}
0

State:

To manages the storage of any property you declare as a state. When the state value changes, the view invalidates its appearance and recomputes the body and You should only access a state property from inside the view’s body, or from methods called.

Note: To pass a state property to another view in the view hierarchy, use the variable name with the $ prefix operator.

struct ContentView: View {
    @State private var isSmile : Bool = false
    var body: some View {
        VStack{
            Text(isSmile ? "😄" : "😭").font(.custom("Arial", size: 120))
            Toggle(isOn: $isSmile, label: {
                    Text("State")
                }).fixedSize()
        }
    }
}

enter image description here

Binding:

The parent view declares a property to hold the isSmile state, using the State property wrapper to indicate that this property is the value’s source of deferent view.

struct ContentView: View {
    @State private var isSmile : Bool = false
    var body: some View {
        VStack{
            Text(isSmile ? "😄" : "😭").font(.custom("Arial", size: 120))
            SwitchView(isSmile: $isSmile)
        }
    }
}

Use a binding to create a two-way connection between a property that stores data, and a view that displays and changes the data.

struct SwitchView: View {
    @Binding var isSmile : Bool
    var body: some View {
        VStack{
                Toggle(isOn: $isSmile, label: {
                    Text("Binding")
                }).fixedSize()
        }
    }
}

enter image description here

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