34

When you pickle an object that has some attributes which cannot be pickled it will fail with a generic error message like:

PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'instancemethod'>: attribute lookup __builtin__.instancemethod failed

Is there any way to tell which attribute caused the exception? I am using Python 2.5.2.

Even though I understand in principle the root cause of the problem (e.g. in the above example having an instance method) it can still be very hard to exactly pinpoint it. In my case I already defined a custom __getstate__ method, but forgot about a critical attribute. This happened in a complicated structure of nested objects, so it took me a while to identify the bad attribute.

As requested, here is one simple example were pickle intentionally fails:

import cPickle as pickle
import new

class Test(object):
    pass

def test_func(self):
    pass

test = Test()
pickle.dumps(test)
print "now with instancemethod..."
test.test_meth = new.instancemethod(test_func, test)
pickle.dumps(test)

This is the output:

now with instancemethod...
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/home/wilbert/develop/workspace/Playground/src/misc/picklefail.py", line 15, in <module>
    pickle.dumps(test)
  File "/home/wilbert/lib/python2.5/copy_reg.py", line 69, in _reduce_ex
    raise TypeError, "can't pickle %s objects" % base.__name__
TypeError: can't pickle instancemethod objects

Unfortunately there is no hint that the attribute test_meth causes the problem.

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  • can you maybe give a small example of a failing attribute? or at least show a bit more of the traceback to see where in the pickle module it fails? – MrTopf Feb 20 '09 at 16:00
  • oh, and which Python version are you using? – MrTopf Feb 20 '09 at 16:02
  • @MrTopf: added the information – nikow Feb 20 '09 at 17:18
  • thanks, but actually I think your only choice is indeed patching (and filing a bug report). – MrTopf Feb 21 '09 at 0:56
16

You could file a bug against Python for not including more helpful error messages. In the meantime, modify the _reduce_ex() function in copy_reg.py.

if base is self.__class__:
    print self # new   
    raise TypeError, "can't pickle %s objects" % base.__name__

Output:

<bound method ?.test_func of <__main__.Test object at 0xb7f4230c>>
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "nopickle.py", line 14, in ?
    pickle.dumps(test)
  File "/usr/lib/python2.4/copy_reg.py", line 69, in _reduce_ex
    raise TypeError, "can't pickle %s objects" % base.__name__
TypeError: can't pickle instancemethod objects
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  • 3
    why not simply putting "self" into the error message instead of the print? – MrTopf Feb 21 '09 at 0:57
  • 1
    I believe this covers the "TypeError" exception in the example, however the original "PicklingError" exception is not addressed. – cmcginty Aug 5 '09 at 22:56
  • 1
    I think this should be part of Python, or at least merged in with the raise statement. – xitrium Jun 1 '10 at 6:49
  • 2
    It's hard to believe the accepted answer is to modify the python distribution and recompile. (1) You can do the same thing without modifying python, and (2) if you are going to do such a thing, at least submit a patch to python. – Mike McKerns Dec 20 '14 at 15:12
  • 1
    @dashesy: mine and the other two answers are all viable methods to find which attribute(s) cause the pickling error. dill.detect can be used to check which objects fail to pickle with dill. If the library you are interested in uses pickle, and you want to use dill… just type import dill and it will load dill registered types into the pickle registry… without editing the 3rd party code. If you want to use dill to detect errors, but not augment python's pickle module… then type: dill.extend(False). – Mike McKerns Mar 11 '15 at 0:30
10

I had the same problem as you, but my classes were a bit more complicated (i.e. a large tree of similar objects) so the printing didn't help much so I hacked together a helper function. It is not complete and is only intended for use with pickling protocol 2: It was enough so I could locate my problems. If you want to extend it to cover everything, the protocol is described at http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0307/ i've made this post editable so everybody can update the code.

import pickle
def get_pickling_errors(obj,seen=None):
    if seen == None:
        seen = []
    try:
        state = obj.__getstate__()
    except AttributeError:
        return
    if state == None:
        return
    if isinstance(state,tuple):
        if not isinstance(state[0],dict):
            state=state[1]
        else:
            state=state[0].update(state[1])
    result = {}    
    for i in state:
        try:
            pickle.dumps(state[i],protocol=2)
        except pickle.PicklingError:
            if not state[i] in seen:
                seen.append(state[i])
                result[i]=get_pickling_errors(state[i],seen)
    return result

An example of the usage where K is the object that doesn't pickle

>>> get_pickling_errors(K)
{'_gen': {}, '_base': {'_gens': None}}

This means that the attibute K._gen is not picklable and the same goes for K._base._gens.

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  • Thanks, it helps. And I think __getstate__() should defined in corresponding Class. – GoingMyWay Nov 24 '15 at 6:31
3

I have found that if you subclass Pickler and wrap the Pickler.save() method in a try, except block

import pickle
class MyPickler (pickle.Pickler):
    def save(self, obj):
        try:
            pickle.Pickler.save(self, obj)
        except Exception, e:
            import pdb;pdb.set_trace()

Then call it like so

import StringIO
output = StringIO.StringIO()
MyPickler(output).dump(thingee)
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  • Isn't this just starting a debugger? Is there any difference to, e.g., just using the Eclipse PyDev Debugger to look at the problem? – nikow Oct 21 '11 at 8:07
  • If the PyDev debugger will start up on the exception and put you in the right level of execution, it is the same. I don't use an IDE though. – Stuart Mitchell Oct 30 '11 at 23:16
  • I used this to locate a particularly difficult-to-find Pickle error. But rather than having the except clause start the debugger, I just had it print obj and raise the exception. Then, running the MyPickler(output).dump(obj) resulted in a nice traceback-like report of exactly where the unpickleable object was in my deeply-nested structures. What a day. – partofthething Mar 29 '13 at 23:17
3

If you use dill, your example doesn't fail to pickle...

>>> import dill
>>> import new
>>> 
>>> class Test(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> def test_func(self):
...     pass
... 
>>> test = Test()
>>> dill.dumps(test)
'\x80\x02cdill.dill\n_create_type\nq\x00(cdill.dill\n_load_type\nq\x01U\x08TypeTypeq\x02\x85q\x03Rq\x04U\x04Testq\x05h\x01U\nObjectTypeq\x06\x85q\x07Rq\x08\x85q\t}q\n(U\r__slotnames__q\x0b]q\x0cU\n__module__q\rU\x08__main__q\x0eU\x07__doc__q\x0fNutq\x10Rq\x11)\x81q\x12}q\x13b.'
>>> test.test_meth = new.instancemethod(test_func, test)
>>> dill.dumps(test)
'\x80\x02cdill.dill\n_create_type\nq\x00(cdill.dill\n_load_type\nq\x01U\x08TypeTypeq\x02\x85q\x03Rq\x04U\x04Testq\x05h\x01U\nObjectTypeq\x06\x85q\x07Rq\x08\x85q\t}q\n(U\r__slotnames__q\x0b]q\x0cU\n__module__q\rU\x08__main__q\x0eU\x07__doc__q\x0fNutq\x10Rq\x11)\x81q\x12}q\x13U\ttest_methq\x14h\x01U\nMethodTypeq\x15\x85q\x16Rq\x17cdill.dill\n_create_function\nq\x18(cdill.dill\n_unmarshal\nq\x19Ubc\x01\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00\x01\x00\x00\x00C\x00\x00\x00s\x04\x00\x00\x00d\x00\x00S(\x01\x00\x00\x00N(\x00\x00\x00\x00(\x01\x00\x00\x00t\x04\x00\x00\x00self(\x00\x00\x00\x00(\x00\x00\x00\x00s\x07\x00\x00\x00<stdin>t\t\x00\x00\x00test_func\x01\x00\x00\x00s\x02\x00\x00\x00\x00\x01q\x1a\x85q\x1bRq\x1cc__builtin__\n__main__\nU\ttest_funcq\x1dNN}q\x1etq\x1fRq h\x12N\x87q!Rq"sb.'

So we have to find something that dill can't pickle...

>>> class Unpicklable(object):
...   def breakme(self):
...     self.x = iter(set())
... 
>>> u = Unpicklable()
>>> dill.dumps(u)
'\x80\x02cdill.dill\n_create_type\nq\x00(cdill.dill\n_load_type\nq\x01U\x08TypeTypeq\x02\x85q\x03Rq\x04U\x0bUnpicklableq\x05h\x01U\nObjectTypeq\x06\x85q\x07Rq\x08\x85q\t}q\n(U\r__slotnames__q\x0b]q\x0cU\n__module__q\rU\x08__main__q\x0eU\x07breakmeq\x0fcdill.dill\n_create_function\nq\x10(cdill.dill\n_unmarshal\nq\x11U\xafc\x01\x00\x00\x00\x02\x00\x00\x00\x02\x00\x00\x00C\x00\x00\x00s"\x00\x00\x00d\x01\x00d\x00\x00l\x00\x00}\x01\x00t\x01\x00t\x02\x00\x83\x00\x00\x83\x01\x00|\x00\x00_\x03\x00d\x00\x00S(\x02\x00\x00\x00Ni\xff\xff\xff\xff(\x04\x00\x00\x00t\t\x00\x00\x00itertoolst\x04\x00\x00\x00itert\x03\x00\x00\x00sett\x01\x00\x00\x00x(\x02\x00\x00\x00t\x04\x00\x00\x00selfR\x00\x00\x00\x00(\x00\x00\x00\x00(\x00\x00\x00\x00s\x07\x00\x00\x00<stdin>t\x07\x00\x00\x00breakme\x02\x00\x00\x00s\x04\x00\x00\x00\x00\x01\x0c\x01q\x12\x85q\x13Rq\x14c__builtin__\n__main__\nh\x0fNN}q\x15tq\x16Rq\x17U\x07__doc__q\x18Nutq\x19Rq\x1a)\x81q\x1b}q\x1cb.'
>>> u.breakme()
>>> dill.dumps(u)
Traceback (most recent call last):
…(snip)… 
pickle.PicklingError: Can't pickle <type 'setiterator'>: it's not found as __builtin__.setiterator
>>>

If the error message wasn't good, I could use dill.detect to see which what unpicklable objects the top-level object contains.

>>> dill.detect.badobjects(u, depth=1)
{'__hash__': <method-wrapper '__hash__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__setattr__': <method-wrapper '__setattr__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__reduce_ex__': <built-in method __reduce_ex__ of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__reduce__': <built-in method __reduce__ of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__str__': <method-wrapper '__str__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__format__': <built-in method __format__ of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__getattribute__': <method-wrapper '__getattribute__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__delattr__': <method-wrapper '__delattr__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, 'breakme': <bound method Unpicklable.breakme of <__main__.Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>>, '__repr__': <method-wrapper '__repr__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__dict__': {'x': <setiterator object at 0x10a370820>}, 'x': <setiterator object at 0x10a370820>, '__sizeof__': <built-in method __sizeof__ of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>, '__init__': <method-wrapper '__init__' of Unpicklable object at 0x10a37b350>}
>>> dill.detect.badtypes(u, depth=1)
{'__hash__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, '__setattr__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, '__reduce_ex__': <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>, '__reduce__': <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>, '__str__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, '__format__': <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>, '__getattribute__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, '__delattr__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, 'breakme': <type 'instancemethod'>, '__repr__': <type 'method-wrapper'>, '__dict__': <type 'dict'>, 'x': <type 'setiterator'>, '__sizeof__': <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>, '__init__': <type 'method-wrapper'>}
>>> set(dill.detect.badtypes(u, depth=1).values())
set([<type 'dict'>, <type 'method-wrapper'>, <type 'instancemethod'>, <type 'setiterator'>, <type 'builtin_function_or_method'>])

dill doesn't rely on the __getstate__ method being present, although maybe it should utilize it if it exists. You can also use objgraph to get a picture of all the object dependencies that are used to build the thing that doesn't pickle. It can help you sort out what the root of the problem is, based on the above information.

See dill.detect use in tracking down unpicklable items in this issue: https://github.com/uqfoundation/dill/issues/58

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