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I'm not sure why but my method won't work, is there a way to compare self with its parent struct? I added the data structures for context.

#[derive(PartialEq, Copy, Clone, Debug)]
enum Suits {
    Hearts,
    Spades,
    Clubs,
    Diamonds,
}

#[derive(PartialEq, Copy, Clone, Debug)]
struct Card {
    card_num: u8,
    card_suit: Suits,
}



    fn match_card(&self, deck: &[Option<Card>]) -> bool {
        for i in deck.iter() {
            match i.unwrap() {
                self => {
                    println!("\nFound card in deck!\nCard found is {:#?}\n", i.unwrap());
                    return true;
                }
                _ => continue,
            }
        }
        false
    }

I get:

`self` value is a keyword and may not be bound to variables or shadowed
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  • 1
    It's hard to answer your question because it doesn't include a minimal reproducible example. We can't tell what crates (and their versions), types, traits, fields, etc. are present in the code. It would make it easier for us to help you if you try to reproduce your error on the Rust Playground if possible, otherwise in a brand new Cargo project, then edit your question to include the additional info. There are Rust-specific MRE tips you can use to reduce your original code for posting here. Thanks!
    – Shepmaster
    Jul 10 '19 at 19:43
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The match statement matches the provided value against patterns. Matching a value against a pattern is different from testing for equality. If the latter is what you want to do, use an if statement instead. You can read up on patterns in the subsection on pattern syntax in the book.

A pattern consisting of just an identifier, say x, matches whatever value is provided, and this value is assigned to x. This means the pattern self does not compare the value with the value of self, but instead tries to assign the value of the match expression to self, which is not allowed, as the error message explains.

Your function should instead be written like this:

fn match_card(&self, deck: &[Option<Card>]) -> bool {
    deck.iter().flatten().any(|card| card == self)
}

This assumes that PartialEq is implemented for the Card type, which can usually be done using #[derive(PartialEq)].

The flatten() method in the code above treats each Option<Card> as a nested iterator. Iterating an Option yields no elements if the option is None, or otherwise the single value wrapped in the option. This means that deck.iter().flatten() is an iterator yielding an &Card for all Some(_) items in the slice, while all None items are simply skipped.

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Assuming Card implements PartialEq, you may use a match guard:

fn match_card(&self, deck: &[Option<Card>]) -> bool {
    for i in deck.iter() {
        match i {
            Some(c) if c == self => {
                println!("\nFound card in deck!\nCard found is {:#?}\n", c);
                return true;
            }
            _ => continue,
        }
    }
    false
}

playground demo

I can't tell what the real code is, but if you have no reason to use a match, a simple if test would be more appropriate here.

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