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This service method will return an IQueryable<Vehicle>:

public IQueryable<Vehicle> GetVehicles()
{
    return
        from v in _context.Vehicles
        where
            v.Schedule == true
            && v.Suspend == false
        select v;
}

If I want to include another table in the query:

public IQueryable<Vehicle> GetVehicles()
{

    return
        from v in _context.Vehicles
        join si in _context.ServiceIntervals on v.Id equals si.VehicleId into loj
        from rs in loj.DefaultIfEmpty()
        where
            v.Schedule == true
            && v.Suspend == false
        select new { vehicle = v, repair = rs };

}

What's the correct IQueryable<T> return type? IQueryable<{vehicle,repair}> isn't correct.

Is there a better way to compose the select statement?

** Edit **

I was hoping to keep this simple, but I think a clarification is useful.

ServiceIntervals is actually an IQueryable<T> that references a table-valued function from another SQL DB:

public IQueryable<ServiceInterval> ServiceIntervals(DateTime startingDate, DateTime endingDate) =>
    Query<ServiceInterval>().FromSql($@"
        SELECT *
        FROM OtherDatabase.Dbo.ServiceIntervals({startingDate}, {endingDate})"
    );

The origin query actually includes dates:

...
_context.ServiceIntervals(DateTime.Now.Date,DateTime.Now.Date)
...

As such, I don't think ServiceIntervals can be exposed as a navigation property on the Vehicle entity.

  • I could be wrong, but IQueryable seems like the wrong return type because you are actually resolving your query before returning. I would use the fluent LINQ extensions syntax to make this much more apparent. – Sam Axe Jul 10 '19 at 21:09
  • 1
    @SamAxe Not sure what you mean, but the query isn't executed before returning so IQueryable is a valid return type. – Gert Arnold Jul 10 '19 at 21:12
  • @Gert is correct, DefaultIfEmpty returns an IQueryable, as does Select. – Travis J Jul 10 '19 at 21:16
  • What is the relationship between ServiceIntervals and Vehicles? – Rogala Jul 12 '19 at 22:29
  • Your could call it one-to-many (Vehicle --< ServiceIntervals). The tables are in different databases provided by different vendors. – craig Jul 13 '19 at 13:29
3

Doing select new {} in LINQ creates an anonymous type, which by definition is anonymous and can't be used as a return type. If you want to return this variable, you have to create a type for it.

public class VehicleServiceDTO
{
   public Vehicle Vehicle { get; set; }
   public ServiceInterval Repair { get; set; }
}

public IQueryable<VehicleServiceDTO> GetVehicles()
{

    return
        from v in _context.Vehicles
        join si in _context.ServiceIntervals on v.Id equals si.VehicleId into loj
        from rs in loj.DefaultIfEmpty()
        where
            v.Schedule == true
            && v.Suspend == false
        select new VehicleServiceDTO() { Vehicle = v, Repair = rs };

}

You can change the types and variable names in the custom DTO class to match the type of _context.ServiceIntervals (I assumed it was called ServiceInterval).

| improve this answer | |
2

I don't necessarily think you shouldn't use a navigation property here. They are virtual and a query is generated base on the Linq statement.

I also don't think a separate DTO model makes sense in this case. I'm making an assumption, since you mentioned a navigation property, that you have a 1-many relationship. My guess is that the vehicle should be scheduled with a collection of repairs. If that is the case, then maybe a GroupJoin would work. It is supported by EF: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/framework/data/adonet/ef/language-reference/supported-and-unsupported-linq-methods-linq-to-entities

I added a property to hold the repairs to the Vehicle:

public IEnumerable<ServiceInterval> RepairsToSchedule { get; set; }

Then the query ends up looking something like this:

public static IQueryable<Vehicle> GetVehicles()
{
    return _context.Vehicles
        .Where(v => v.Schedule && !v.Suspend)
        .GroupJoin(_context.ServiceIntervals,
            v => v.Id,
            si => si.VehicleId,
            (v, si) => SetServiceIntervals(v, si));
}

I used the static method below to add the ServiceIntervals to the Vehicle:

private static Vehicle SetServiceIntervals(Vehicle v, IEnumerable<ServiceInterval> si)
{
    v.RepairsToSchedule = si;
    return v;
}

The entire source code is below: Edited: adjusted for two separate database (note, on same server)

using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore;
using Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Diagnostics;
using Newtonsoft.Json;
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace StackoverFlow
{
    class Program
    {
        private static FakeDatabaseContext _context = new FakeDatabaseContext();
        private static FakeDatabaseContext2 _context2 = new FakeDatabaseContext2();

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            CleanContext();
            LoadContext();

            foreach (var vehicle in GetVehicles())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(vehicle, Formatting.Indented));
                Console.WriteLine();
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public static IQueryable<Vehicle> GetVehicles()
        {
            return _context.Vehicles
                .Where(v => v.Schedule && !v.Suspend)
                .GroupJoin(_context.ServiceIntervals(new DateTime(), new DateTime()),
                    v => v.Id,
                    si => si.VehicleId,
                    (v, si) => SetServiceIntervals(v, si));
        }

        private static Vehicle SetServiceIntervals(Vehicle v, IEnumerable<ServiceInterval> si)
        {
            v.RepairsToSchedule = si;
            return v;
        }

        #region EF Context
        public class FakeDatabaseContext : DbContext
        {
            public DbSet<Vehicle> Vehicles { get; set; }
            private DbSet<ServiceInterval> _serviceIntervals { get; set; }

            public IQueryable<ServiceInterval> ServiceIntervals(DateTime startingDate, DateTime endingDate)
            {
                return _serviceIntervals.FromSql($@"
                    SELECT *
                    FROM Stackoverflow2.dbo.ServiceIntervals"
                );
            }

            protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
            {
                optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(
                    @"Server=(localdb)\mssqllocaldb;Database=Stackoverflow;Integrated Security=True");
                optionsBuilder
                    .ConfigureWarnings(w => w.Throw(RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning));
            }
        }

        // Used to load a seperate database
        public class FakeDatabaseContext2 : DbContext
        {
            public DbSet<ServiceInterval> ServiceIntervals { get; set; }

            protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
            {
                optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(
                    @"Server=(localdb)\mssqllocaldb;Database=Stackoverflow2;Integrated Security=True");
                optionsBuilder
                    .ConfigureWarnings(w => w.Throw(RelationalEventId.QueryClientEvaluationWarning));
            }
        }

        public class Vehicle
        {
            public string Id { get; set; }
            public bool Schedule { get; set; }
            public bool Suspend { get; set; }
            public IEnumerable<ServiceInterval> RepairsToSchedule { get; set; }
        }

        public class ServiceInterval
        {
            public string Id { get; set; }
            public string VehicleId { get; set; }
        }
        #endregion EF Context

        #region Seed methods
        private static Random _random = new Random();
        private static bool _randomBool => _random.Next() % 2 == 1;

        private static void LoadContext()
        {
            var maxVehicles = 10;
            for (int i = 1; i < maxVehicles; i++)
            {
                _context.Vehicles.Add(new Vehicle { Id = i.ToString(), Schedule = _randomBool, Suspend = _randomBool });

                for (int o = 1; o < _random.Next(10); o++)
                {
                    _context2.ServiceIntervals.Add(new ServiceInterval { Id = ((maxVehicles * i) + o).ToString(), VehicleId = i.ToString() });
                }
            };

            _context.SaveChanges();
            _context2.SaveChanges();
        }

        private static void CleanContext()
        {
            _context.Vehicles.RemoveRange(_context.Vehicles.ToArray());
            _context2.ServiceIntervals.RemoveRange(_context2.ServiceIntervals.ToArray());
            _context.SaveChanges();
            _context2.SaveChanges();
        }
        #endregion Seed methods
    }
}

IntelliTrace showed this query was executed:

SELECT [v].[Id], [v].[Schedule], [v].[Suspend], [si].[Id], [si].[VehicleId]
FROM [Vehicles] AS [v]
LEFT JOIN (

                        SELECT *
                        FROM Stackoverflow2.dbo.ServiceIntervals
) AS [si] ON [v].[Id] = [si].[VehicleId]
WHERE ([v].[Schedule] = 1) AND ([v].[Suspend] = 0)
ORDER BY [v].[Id]

I tested this a few times, and everything appears to be working fine.

~Cheers

Setup Project Notes:

  1. This is a .NET Core 2.1 Console Application
  2. Install-Package Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore -Version 2.2.6
  3. Install-Package Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.Design -Version 2.2.6
  4. Install-Package Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.SqlServer -Version 2.2.6
  5. Install-Package Microsoft.EntityFrameworkCore.SqlServer.Design -Version 1.1.6
  6. Open cmd window and navigate to project folder
  7. Run in Console: dotnet ef migrations add InitialCreate
  8. Run in Console: dotnet ef database update
| improve this answer | |
  • Note that this must trigger client-side evaluation because you combine IQueryables from different sources in one query. I'd prefer to get the vehicles and service intervals in separate queries and combine them in code. EF core 3+ will abandon client-side evaluation. – Gert Arnold Jul 11 '19 at 19:22
  • @GertArnold I updated the code to throw an exception if client side evaluation occurs. The code does not throw an exception. I'll run a profiler to verify later. – Rogala Jul 11 '19 at 22:27
  • @GertArnold I looked at the IntelliTrace events, and the query sent to the database is a left outer join that filters on schedule and suspended. So client side evaluation is not occurring here. ~cheers – Rogala Jul 11 '19 at 22:49
  • Then you probably missed the last update of the question. OP added that ServiceIntervals is from a different data source. – Gert Arnold Jul 12 '19 at 14:51
  • 1
    Good job! I must admit I'd never expected EF to combine a SqlQuery result and a DbSet into one SQL statement. BTW, I think you don't even need the second context, or did you forget to modify some parts of the code? – Gert Arnold Jul 13 '19 at 12:16

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