-1

If I use a .Any() to check if a list/collection contains values, is it possible to somehow use those values to avoid calling a separate .Where()?

for example:

if(thisList.Any(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck)
{
    //use i here instead of thisList.Where(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck)
}

Edit for clarity: I am using the .Any essentially as a null check so that I can safely use any results of Where without having to do other checks. Rather than writing the code for assigning something to .Where I wanted to use any values that matched in the .Any instead

3
  • 5
    If you want the values use Where() Jul 11, 2019 at 9:38
  • Do you just want a matching value, or all matching values?
    – Rawling
    Jul 11, 2019 at 9:41
  • 1
    No, Any() does return only a boolean, and does not enumerate all the values so you should consider other functions like Where(condition).
    – Cleptus
    Jul 11, 2019 at 9:53

3 Answers 3

3

No, but you could use a foreach:

foreach(var x in thisList.Where(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck))
{
    //use x here 
}

If you want to know after the loop that there were matching values you could initialize a bool variable to true in it. That's not very elegant but efficient because you execute the query only once.

If the result-list isn't large you can also put the matching items into another list to make the code nicer:

var matchingItemList = thisList.Where(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck).ToList();
if(mattchingItemList.Any()) // efficient because the query is not executed again 
{
    // use matchingItemList, for example with a loop
}

If you just expect one matching item you can use FirstOrDefault:

var x = thisList.FirstOrDefault(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck);
if(x != null)
{
   // use x
}
1

How about using the where first and then skipping the any in favor of a count?

        var passed = thisList.Where(i => i.fieldCheck == thingToCheck);
        if (passed.Count() > 0)
        {
            foreach (var pass in passed)
            {
                //dostuff
            }
        }
2
  • Any is more efficient than Count, the former needs to find only one item matching the condition, the latter needs to execute the query completely to find and count all matches. Any is also more readable because it expresses the intention more clearly. Sep 30, 2020 at 12:08
  • the question asked about reusing the any as a where. The answer is no, but you can do it in reverse. If you are truely concerned about the time taken by count, you probably have bigger fish to fry
    – Broom
    Sep 30, 2020 at 16:10
-1

I wrote the following extension to get around this

public static bool AnyOut<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate, out IEnumerable<TSource> result)
{
    result = default;

    List<TSource> query = new List<TSource>();

    foreach(TSource item in source)
    {
        if (predicate(item))
            query.Add(item);
    }

    if (null == query || !query.Any())
        return false;

    result = query;
    return true;
}
public static bool AnyOut<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, bool> predicate, out List<TSource> result)
{
    result = default;

    List<TSource> query = new List<TSource>();

    foreach (TSource item in source)
    {
        if (predicate(item))
            query.Add(item);
    }

    if (null == query || !query.Any())
        return false;

    result = query.ToList();
    return true;
}

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