4

I have struggled with this for years and normally just code my way around it, but it is time to solve it.

I am declaring a var that returns a new anon type and want to put it in a try/catch. However, doing that means it is out of scope and cannot be seen by later code obviously. Normally I just declare it first, then wrap the code in the try/catch then reassign inside of it like:

int result = 0;

try
{
    result = 77; //real code goes here
}
catch (Exception)
{
    throw;
}

But here is my real code that I cannot figure out how to do something like that:


    try
    {
        var dt_stop = (from s in cDb.DistributionStopInformations
                       join r in cDb.DistributionRouteHeaders on s.RouteCode equals r.RouteCode
                       where r.RouteDate == s.RouteDate &&
                       r.BranchId == s.BranchId &&
                       (r.CompanyNo == companyNo && s.CompanyNo == companyNo)
                       && s.UniqueIdNo == uniqueId

                       select new
                       {
                           s,
                           r
                       }).Single();
    }
    catch (Exception)
    { //no this will not be blank
        throw;
    }

UPDATE: I do use dt_stop extensively after this, I am wanting to catch if there is a problem with it is assigned data.

I created the following class:

 public class StopData
{
    public DistributionStopInformation S { get; set; }

    public DistributionRouteHeader R { get; set; }
}

Then I attempt to use is like:

 StopData dt_stop = null;

        try
        {
            dt_stop = (from S in cDb.DistributionStopInformations
                       join R in cDb.DistributionRouteHeaders on S.RouteCode equals R.RouteCode
                       where R.RouteDate == S.RouteDate &&
                       R.BranchId == S.BranchId &&
                       (R.CompanyNo == companyNo && S.CompanyNo == companyNo)
                       && S.UniqueIdNo == uniqueId

                       select new StopData
                       {
                           S,
                           R
                       }).Single();

        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            //YES....THERE WILL BE CODE HERE
            throw;
        }

I am getting Cannot initialize type 'StopData' with a collection initializer because it does not implement 'System.Collections.IEnumerable'

5
  • 4
    Do you actually have a catch block that does nothing but throw? If so, I'd strongly recommend removing it entirely.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 11, 2019 at 11:32
  • If dt_stop is only filled with data within the try/catch, why would you use it afterwards? You would risk a NullReferenceException
    – kara
    Jul 11, 2019 at 11:33
  • you could declare a dynamic variable before the try and use it afterwards
    – user11523568
    Jul 11, 2019 at 11:35
  • An anonymous object is closely coupled to the code that uses it, so you can put that code in the try catch block. If the generation and the use are so different that they should be separated, it's a sign that you should define a type (as many of the answers suggest) Jul 11, 2019 at 11:38
  • @JonSkeet - no, it will be filled out
    – Joe Ruder
    Jul 11, 2019 at 12:20

5 Answers 5

5

Anonymous types are syntactic sugar to avoid you to name them. Anonymous types are used by the compiler to let you focus on what you want the program do.

For this reason, if you end up on referencing an anonymous type, it means that it is no longer anonymous:) Just give it a name and your issue goes away:

MyType dt_stop = null;
try
{
   dt_stop = (from s in cDb.DistributionStopInformations
                  join r in cDb.DistributionRouteHeaders on s.RouteCode equals r.RouteCode
                  where r.RouteDate == s.RouteDate &&
                  r.BranchId == s.BranchId &&
                  (r.CompanyNo == companyNo && s.CompanyNo == companyNo)
                  && s.UniqueIdNo == uniqueId

                  select new MyType
                  {
                      s,
                      r
                  }).Single();
}
catch (Exception)
{
   // here dt_stop can be used
   throw;
}

MyType can be a System.Tuple or a standard class. To preserve your semantics, you can make it a DTO (fill in your types as I cannot infer them from your source):

internal sealed class MyType
{
    public <The type of s> S {get; set;}
    public <The type of r> R {get; set;}
}
4
  • I made a change but did it wrong...one moment please.
    – Joe Ruder
    Jul 11, 2019 at 12:28
  • OK...it got further along but not quite there yet.
    – Joe Ruder
    Jul 11, 2019 at 12:35
  • Well, can you try to change your type to use a constructor and initialize the parameters there. it should work, but I cannot test it right now.
    – Yennefer
    Jul 11, 2019 at 12:48
  • that is what I was going to try and do, I started to but ran out of time for this. I will have to swing back to it.
    – Joe Ruder
    Jul 11, 2019 at 13:34
3

You can declare a default instance of your anonymous type like:

var temp = new {A = default(int), B = default(int)};
try
{
    temp = new  {A= 1, B=2};
}
catch (Exception)
{
}
0

Have you tried declaring an expando object outside?

dynamic dt_stop = new ExpandoObject();

It's a dynamic object which works at runtime

0

The only solution I can think of is using a dynamic type. So dynamic instead of var. But be aware that there's no intellisense on dynamic types.

2
  • Bruno's answer creating another instance of the anonymous type is fine here.
    – Jon Skeet
    Jul 11, 2019 at 12:46
  • Sorry, saw it after sending my response (we responded at the same time).
    – Alexander
    Jul 11, 2019 at 15:01
0

Or use a ValueTuple.

var thing = default((int S, int R));
try
{
    thing = /*..*/.Select((s, r));
}
catch (Exception)
{
}

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