15

In WindowsForms I just added event handlers as follows:

    private void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine($"=> Form1_MouseDown, Clicks: {e.Clicks}, Location: {e.Location}");
    }

    private void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine($"=> Form1_MouseUp, Clicks: {e.Clicks}, Location: {e.Location}");
    }

    private void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
    {
        Debug.WriteLine($"=> Form1_MouseMove, Clicks: {e.Clicks}, Location: {e.Location}");
    }

And the output is:

=> Form1_MouseMove, Clicks: 0, Location: {X=17,Y=21}
=> Form1_MouseDown, Clicks: 1, Location: {X=17,Y=21}
=> Form1_MouseUp,   Clicks: 1, Location: {X=17,Y=21}
=> Form1_MouseMove, Clicks: 0, Location: {X=17,Y=21}

You can see that all events occurs in the same location, So my question is why is there a MouseMove event after MouseUp event?

Also I tried similar code in WPF and MouseMove event NOT occurred.

And I tried similar code in C++ and MouseMove event NOT occurred:

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hWnd, UINT message, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    switch (message)
    {
     ...

    case WM_MOUSEMOVE:
        OutputDebugString(L"WM_MOUSEMOVE\n");
        break;

    case WM_LBUTTONDOWN:
        OutputDebugString(L"WM_LBUTTONDOWN\n");
        break;

    case WM_LBUTTONUP:
        OutputDebugString(L"WM_LBUTTONUP\n");
        break;

    default:
        return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
    }
    return 0;
}
  • Is the mouse moving? If so it'll generate movement events. – tadman Jul 11 at 18:33
  • It is incorrect to assume that the order of messages arriving in a Windows callback function matches your physical actions. It is not a FIFO queue. – Jeff D. Jul 11 at 18:55
  • @JeffD. see here and here – google dev Jul 11 at 19:46
  • 1
    You must always assume that the OS might synthesize a MouseMove notification, even if the mouse did not move. It sets off a sequence of other messages that affect the cursor shape for example. In this case it happens because the mouse capture state changed. Add this.Capture = false; to the MouseDown event handler to see a difference. – Hans Passant Jul 13 at 18:14
  • 2
    The links you posted in response to @Jeff's comment just support what he wrote. As for your question itself, "Why?" questions are generally primarily opinion-based, and this is no exception. You need to ask Microsoft why a WM_MOUSEMOVE is generated following a WM_MOUSEUP. That said, your code should always be prepared to deal with a mouse-move, and either Windows or .NET might generate one in this scenario to work around buggy programs that don't e.g. reset their cursor state on a mouse-up (most programs will check cursor state on mouse-move). – Peter Duniho Jul 13 at 18:22
11
+50

If your mouse had previously been focused on a separate window, then clicking on a new window and shifting the focus of the mouse will generate a mouse move event (even if the mouse didn't move immediately before or after you clicked your mouse).

Here is a link to a similar StackOverflow response "Ghost" MouseMove Event

7

This is because the mouse capture by the MouseDown is released on MouseUp. And this extra MouseMove may be to ensure the cursor position. As a workaround you can do this

        Point LastLocation = Point.Empty;

        private void Form1_MouseDown(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("=> Form1_MouseDown, Clicks: " + e.Location + ", Location: " + e.Location + "");
        }

        private void Form1_MouseUp(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine("=> Form1_MouseUp, Clicks: " + e.Location + ", Location: " + e.Location + "");

        }

        private void Form1_MouseMove(object sender, MouseEventArgs e)
        {
            if (LastLocation != e.Location)
            {
                LastLocation = e.Location;
                Debug.WriteLine("=> Form1_MouseMove, Clicks: " + e.Location + ", Location: " + e.Location + "");
            }
        }
3

This is the intended behavior and will also be trigger whenever app is being switched (Eg: Alt+Tab).

You should go with workaround as suggested by @VishnuBabu's workaround. And to ignore initial mousemove trigger, you can get the current position of cursor once window is loaded instead of setting the LastLocation to Empty.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.