28

In my SwiftUI view I have to trigger an action when a Toggle() changes its state. The toggle itself only takes a Binding. I therefore tried to trigger the action in the didSet of the @State variable. But the didSet never gets called.

Is there any (other) way to trigger an action? Or any way to observe the value change of a @State variable?

My code looks like this:

struct PWSDetailView : View {

    @ObjectBinding var station: PWS
    @State var isDisplayed: Bool = false {
        didSet {
            if isDisplayed != station.isDisplayed {
                PWSStore.shared.toggleIsDisplayed(station)
            }
        }
    }

    var body: some View {
            VStack {
                ZStack(alignment: .leading) {
                    Rectangle()
                        .frame(width: UIScreen.main.bounds.width, height: 50)
                        .foregroundColor(Color.lokalZeroBlue)
                    Text(station.displayName)
                        .font(.title)
                        .foregroundColor(Color.white)
                        .padding(.leading)
                }

                MapView(latitude: station.latitude, longitude: station.longitude, span: 0.05)
                    .frame(height: UIScreen.main.bounds.height / 3)
                    .padding(.top, -8)

                Form {
                    Toggle(isOn: $isDisplayed)
                    { Text("Wetterstation anzeigen") }
                }

                Spacer()
            }.colorScheme(.dark)
    }
}

The desired behaviour would be that the action "PWSStore.shared.toggleIsDisplayed(station)" is triggered when the Toggle() changes its state.

2
  • Since I don't know everything that's happening behind the scenes in your app, this may not be a solution, but since station is a BindableObject, can't you just replace Toggle(isOn: $isDisplayed) with Toggle(isOn: $station.isDisplayed) and then update PWSStore.shared in the didSet on isDisplayed in your PWS class? – graycampbell Jul 12 '19 at 1:02
  • @graycampbell That theoretically works (and this was what I tried earlier). Unfortunately the didChangeValue(forKey:) function of my PWS class (which is a Core Date entity) is called quite often. In some cases (like pressing the toggle) the value of 'isDisplayed' did really change (--> the action should be triggered). In other cases the value of 'isDisplayed' gets "update" with the old value (--> action has not to be triggered). I haven't found I way to distinguish between those two cases. Therefore my attempt to trigger the action directly in the view. – Brezentrager Jul 12 '19 at 5:33

14 Answers 14

1

First, do you actually know that the extra KVO notifications for station.isDisplayed are a problem? Are you experiencing performance problems? If not, then don't worry about it.

If you are experiencing performance problems and you've established that they're due to excessive station.isDisplayed KVO notifications, then the next thing to try is eliminating unneeded KVO notifications. You do that by switching to manual KVO notifications.

Add this method to station's class definition:

@objc class var automaticallyNotifiesObserversOfIsDisplayed: Bool { return false }

And use Swift's willSet and didSet observers to manually notify KVO observers, but only if the value is changing:

@objc dynamic var isDisplayed = false {
    willSet {
        if isDisplayed != newValue { willChangeValue(for: \.isDisplayed) }
    }
    didSet {
        if isDisplayed != oldValue { didChangeValue(for: \.isDisplayed) }
    }
}
1
  • Thanks, Rob! Your first line of code already did the job. @objc class var automaticallyNotifiesObserversOfIsDisplayed: Bool { return false } I do not fully understand the mechanics in the background (and the Apple documentation didn't help much), but it seems that this line only silences some notifications. When an instance of the PWS class is created or when a value for isDisplayed is set (but not changed), there is no notification sent. But when a SwiftUI view actually changes the value of isDisplayed, there still is a notification. For my app that's exactly the behaviour I need. – Brezentrager Jul 12 '19 at 12:50
34

Here is a version without using tapGesture.

@State private var isDisplayed = false
Toggle("", isOn: $isDisplayed)
   .onReceive([self.isDisplayed].publisher.first()) { (value) in
        print("New value is: \(value)")           
   }
4
  • This looks great. No additional Binding required. – Marc T. Jun 4 '20 at 5:44
  • 7
    This is nice! You can also do .onReceive(Just(isDisplayed)) { value in … } – Jacob Jun 8 '20 at 16:47
  • I wonder why you put self.isDisplayed in sqare brackets and append .publisher.first(). In case of an ObservedObject instead of State, you would write nameOfObject.$isDisplayed instead. At least that seems to work in my case. – a learner has no name Jun 11 '20 at 13:11
  • I believe this code is triggered any time the state variable is changed for any reason? – biomiker Jul 22 '20 at 18:11
23

Here is a more generic approach you can apply to any Binding for almost all built in Views like Pickers, Textfields, Toggle..

extension Binding {
    func didSet(execute: @escaping (Value) -> Void) -> Binding {
        return Binding(
            get: {
                return self.wrappedValue
            },
            set: {
                self.wrappedValue = $0
                execute($0)
            }
        )
    }
}

And usage is simply;

@State var isOn: Bool = false
Toggle("Toggle Title", isOn: $isOn.didSet { (state) in
   print(state)
})
1
  • 6
    This is the cleanest implementation. For me the onReceive triggered when ever any of the other state variable in the view changed. With this solution the action only runs when the attached state variable changes. – BitByteDog Aug 23 '20 at 7:00
19

SwiftUI 2

If you're using SwiftUI 2 / iOS 14 you can use onChange:

struct ContentView: View {
    @State private var isDisplayed = false
    
    var body: some View {
        Toggle("", isOn: $isDisplayed)
            .onChange(of: isDisplayed) { value in
                // action...
                print(value)
            }
    }
}
1
  • 2
    This should be the top answer. – user482594 Dec 19 '20 at 21:52
12

The cleanest approach in my opinion is to use a custom binding. With that you have full control when the toggle should actually switch

import SwiftUI

struct ToggleDemo: View {
    @State private var isToggled = false

    var body: some View {

        let binding = Binding(
            get: { self.isToggled },
            set: {
                potentialAsyncFunction($0)
            }
        )

        func potentialAsyncFunction(_ newState: Bool) {
            //something async
            self.isToggled = newState
        }

        return Toggle("My state", isOn: binding)
   }
}
2
  • 1
    Many errors if I already have an ZStacks and VStacks... tried to put inside / outside - only errors – J A S K I E R May 21 '20 at 10:08
  • 1
    This is the correct solution for this problem. There is no reason to dig around with KVO notifications. – Marc T. Jun 4 '20 at 2:30
10

I think it's ok

struct ToggleModel {
    var isWifiOpen: Bool = true {
        willSet {
            print("wifi status will change")
        }
    }
}

struct ToggleDemo: View {
    @State var model = ToggleModel()

    var body: some View {
        Toggle(isOn: $model.isWifiOpen) {
            HStack {
                Image(systemName: "wifi")
                Text("wifi")
            }
       }.accentColor(.pink)
       .padding()
   }
}
6

I found a simpler solution, just use onTapGesture:D

Toggle(isOn: $stateChange) {
  Text("...")
}
.onTapGesture {
  // Any actions here.
}
1
  • 7
    It'll trigger also, even when the Text is tapped. I think that's not a good solution. – Jonas Deichelmann Apr 7 '20 at 11:43
4

Based on @Legolas Wang's answer.

When you hide the original label from the toggle you can attach the tapGesture only to the toggle itself

HStack {
    Text("...")
    Spacer()
    Toggle("", isOn: $stateChange)
        .labelsHidden()
        .onTapGesture {
            // Any actions here.
        }
     }
1
  • Best solution here! FYI - onTap is called before the isOn state actually changes, so I also had to add a 0.1 second delay to the onTap action to that the isOn state has time to switch before the action is called. Thanks! – nicksarno Aug 26 '20 at 15:29
4

This is how I code:

Toggle("Title", isOn: $isDisplayed)
.onReceive([self.isDisplayed].publisher.first()) { (value) in
    //Action code here
}

Updated code (Xcode 12, iOS14):

Toggle("Enabled", isOn: $isDisplayed.didSet { val in
        //Action here        
})
4
  • This is super clean and concise. This should be the correct answer IMHO – Sébastien Stormacq Sep 5 '20 at 21:01
  • I couldn’t get your second working, but the first version certainly solved my problem after a lot of searching. The second version wouldn’t compile for me. Thanks – Manngo Sep 30 '20 at 1:04
  • Thanks! @Manngo I tested it just now. it works on my Xcode12 & iOS14. What is your Xcode version? is there any compile error message? i believe the second is better :) – z33 Sep 30 '20 at 4:14
  • 1
    @z33 I’m on SCode 12, but targetting MacOS 10.15 Catalina. I don’t get an error message directly. The compiler takes forever to decide it can’t go ahead. – Manngo Sep 30 '20 at 6:46
3
class PWSStore : ObservableObject {
    ...
    var station: PWS
    @Published var isDisplayed = true {
        willSet {
            PWSStore.shared.toggleIsDisplayed(self.station)
        }
    }   
}

struct PWSDetailView : View {
    @ObservedObject var station = PWSStore.shared
    ...

    var body: some View {
        ...
        Toggle(isOn: $isDisplayed) { Text("Wetterstation anzeigen") }
        ...
    }   
}

Demo here https://youtu.be/N8pL7uTjEFM

2

You can try this(it's a workaround):

@State var isChecked: Bool = true
@State var index: Int = 0
Toggle(isOn: self.$isChecked) {
        Text("This is a Switch")
        if (self.isChecked) {
            Text("\(self.toggleAction(state: "Checked", index: index))")
        } else {
            CustomAlertView()
            Text("\(self.toggleAction(state: "Unchecked", index: index))")
        }
    }

And below it, create a function like this:

func toggleAction(state: String, index: Int) -> String {
    print("The switch no. \(index) is \(state)")
    return ""
}
2

Here's my approach. I was facing the same issue, but instead decided to wrap UIKit's UISwitch into a new class conforming to UIViewRepresentable.

import SwiftUI

final class UIToggle: UIViewRepresentable {

    @Binding var isOn: Bool
    var changedAction: (Bool) -> Void

    init(isOn: Binding<Bool>, changedAction: @escaping (Bool) -> Void) {
        self._isOn = isOn
        self.changedAction = changedAction
    }

    func makeUIView(context: Context) -> UISwitch {
        let uiSwitch = UISwitch()
        return uiSwitch
    }

    func updateUIView(_ uiView: UISwitch, context: Context) {
        uiView.isOn = isOn
        uiView.addTarget(self, action: #selector(switchHasChanged(_:)), for: .valueChanged)

    }

    @objc func switchHasChanged(_ sender: UISwitch) {
        self.isOn = sender.isOn
        changedAction(sender.isOn)
    }
}

And then its used like this:

struct PWSDetailView : View {
    @State var isDisplayed: Bool = false
    @ObservedObject var station: PWS
    ...

    var body: some View {
        ...

        UIToggle(isOn: $isDisplayed) { isOn in
            //Do something here with the bool if you want
            //or use "_ in" instead, e.g.
            if isOn != station.isDisplayed {
                PWSStore.shared.toggleIsDisplayed(station)
            }
        }
        ...
    }   
}
1
  • For @Philipp Serflings Approaches: Attaching a TapGestureRecognizer was not an option for me, since it's not triggering when you perform a "swipe" to toggle the Toggle. And I would prefer not to lose on functionality of the UISwitch. And using a binding as proxy does the trick, but I dont feel like this is a SwiftUI way of doing it, but this could be a matter of taste. I prefer closures within the View Declaration itself – paescebu Apr 21 '20 at 10:30
0

Just in case you don't want to use extra functions, mess the structure - use states and use it wherever you want. I know it's not a 100% answer for the event trigger, however, the state will be saved and used in the most simple way.

struct PWSDetailView : View {


@State private var isToggle1  = false
@State private var isToggle2  = false

var body: some View {

    ZStack{

        List {
            Button(action: {
                print("\(self.isToggle1)")
                print("\(self.isToggle2)")

            }){
                Text("Settings")
                    .padding(10)
            }

                HStack {

                   Toggle(isOn: $isToggle1){
                      Text("Music")
                   }
                 }

                HStack {

                   Toggle(isOn: $isToggle1){
                      Text("Music")
                   }
                 }
        }
    }
}
}
0

Available for XCode 12

import SwiftUI

struct ToggleView: View {
    
    @State var isActive: Bool = false
    
    var body: some View {
        Toggle(isOn: $isActive) { Text(isActive ? "Active" : "InActive") }
            .padding()
            .toggleStyle(SwitchToggleStyle(tint: .accentColor))
    }
}

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