22

My functional component uses the useEffect hook to fetch data from an API on mount. I want to be able to test that the fetched data is displayed correctly.

While this works fine in the browser, the tests are failing because the hook is asynchronous the component doesn't update in time.

Live code: https://codesandbox.io/s/peaceful-knuth-q24ih?fontsize=14

App.js

import React from "react";

function getData() {
  return new Promise(resolve => {
    setTimeout(() => resolve(4), 400);
  });
}

function App() {
  const [members, setMembers] = React.useState(0);

  React.useEffect(() => {
    async function fetch() {
      const response = await getData();

      setMembers(response);
    }

    fetch();
  }, []);

  return <div>{members} members</div>;
}

export default App;

App.test.js

import App from "./App";
import React from "react";
import { mount } from "enzyme";

describe("app", () => {
  it("should render", () => {
    const wrapper = mount(<App />);

    console.log(wrapper.debug());
  });
});

Besides that, Jest throws a warning saying: Warning: An update to App inside a test was not wrapped in act(...).

I guess this is related? How could this be fixed?

5

7 Answers 7

41

Ok, so I think I've figured something out. I'm using the latest dependencies right now (enzyme 3.10.0, enzyme-adapter-react-16 1.15.1), and I've found something kind of amazing. Enzyme's mount() function appears to return a promise. I haven't seen anything about it in the documentation, but waiting for that promise to resolve appears to solve this problem. Using act from react-dom/test-utils is also essential, as it has all the new React magic to make the behavior work.

it('handles async useEffect', async () => {
    const component = mount(<MyComponent />);
    await act(async () => {
        await Promise.resolve(component);
        await new Promise(resolve => setImmediate(resolve));
        component.update();
    });
    console.log(component.debug());
});
7
  • 4
    You save my life
    – Ben
    May 28, 2020 at 3:33
  • 1
    You my friend are absolute genius. This was driving me absolutely nuts and I tried a million approaches. You deserve a medal for this. Thank you. This worked me on a Preact project just so others know. Aug 26, 2020 at 10:02
  • 4
    I don't think await Promise.resolve(component); does anything. mount returns a ReactWrapper, not a promise. The other lines in your act block flush the task queue and update the wrapper -- those are doing the work.
    – ggorlen
    Apr 22, 2021 at 2:51
  • 1
    What you are saying here as @ggorlen said is not correct, mount does not return a promise, you are essentially just creating a promise and resolve it immediately with Promise.resolve(component) where the resolved value is the wrapper you could replace it with Promise.resolve() and it will still work. also no need for the second await new Promise(resolve => setImmediate(resolve)). What makes it work is that once you added await that made the following code ran after react internal tasks were done.
    – ehab
    May 23, 2021 at 9:50
  • 2
    As stated, the act block can be simplified. In fact, it can be written as a one-liner: await act(() => Promise.resolve()). Don't forget to call component.update() after. Jul 26, 2021 at 20:16
8

I was having this problem and came across this thread. I'm unit testing a hook but the principles should be the same if your async useEffect code is in a component. Because I'm testing a hook, I'm calling renderHook from react hooks testing library. If you're testing a regular component, you'd call render from react-dom, as per the docs.

The problem

Say you have a react hook or component that does some async work on mount and you want to test it. It might look a bit like this:

const useMyExampleHook = id => {
    const [someState, setSomeState] = useState({});
    useEffect(() => {
        const asyncOperation = async () => {
            const result = await axios({
                url: `https://myapi.com/${id}`,
                method: "GET"
            });
            setSomeState(() => result.data);
        }

        asyncOperation();

    }, [id])
    return { someState }
}

Until now, I've been unit testing these hooks like this:

it("should call an api", async () => {
        const data = {wibble: "wobble"};
        axios.mockImplementationOnce(() => Promise.resolve({ data}));

        const { result } = renderHook(() => useMyExampleHook());
        await new Promise(setImmediate);

        expect(result.current.someState).toMatchObject(data);
});

and using await new Promise(setImmediate); to "flush" the promises. This works OK for simple tests like my one above but seems to cause some sort of race condition in the test renderer when we start doing multiple updates to the hook/component in one test.

The answer

The answer is to use act() properly. The docs say

When writing [unit tests]... react-dom/test-utils provides a helper called act() that makes sure all updates related to these “units” have been processed and applied to the DOM before you make any assertions.

So our simple test code actually wants to look like this:


    it("should call an api on render and store the result", async () => {
        const data = { wibble: "wobble" };
        axios.mockImplementationOnce(() => Promise.resolve({ data }));

        let renderResult = {};
        await act(async () => {
            renderResult = renderHook(() => useMyExampleHook());
        })

        expect(renderResult.result.current.someState).toMatchObject(data);
    });

The crucial difference is that async act around the initial render of the hook. That makes sure that the useEffect hook has done its business before we start trying to inspect the state. If we need to update the hook, that action gets wrapped in its own act block too.

A more complex test case might look like this:


    it('should do a new call when id changes', async () => {
        const data1 = { wibble: "wobble" };
        const data2 = { wibble: "warble" };

        axios.mockImplementationOnce(() => Promise.resolve({ data: data1 }))
        .mockImplementationOnce(() => Promise.resolve({ data: data2 }));


        let renderResult = {};
        await act(async () => {
            renderResult = renderHook((id) => useMyExampleHook(id), {
                initialProps: { id: "id1" }
            });
        })

        expect(renderResult.result.current.someState).toMatchObject(data1);

        await act(async () => {
            renderResult.rerender({ id: "id2" })
        })

        expect(renderResult.result.current.someState).toMatchObject(data2);
    })
4
  • 1
    The great answer for a cases since you have a custom hook!! Thank you =)
    – user10970742
    Aug 31, 2021 at 7:24
  • You did not define or addressed what is renderHook
    – vsync
    Jan 29, 2023 at 16:02
  • Sorry @vsync see here: react-hooks-testing-library.com/reference/api#renderhook Feb 14, 2023 at 18:17
  • You should also update your answer to address this mysterious reference :)
    – vsync
    Feb 15, 2023 at 8:16
7

Following on from @user2223059's answer it also looks like you can do:

// eslint-disable-next-line require-await     
component = await mount(<MyComponent />);
component.update();

Unfortunately you need the eslint-disable-next-line because otherwise it warns about an unnecessary await... yet removing the await results in incorrect behaviour.

2
  • 5
    the reason this works isn't specific to mount - when you await a non-promise, you still get a turn through the microtask queue. this is almost identical to: component = mount(...); await Promise.resolve(); component.update();
    – alecf
    Apr 2, 2020 at 23:43
  • It only works by pure luck. sometimes.
    – vsync
    Jan 29, 2023 at 16:01
2

I was also facing similar issue. To solve this I have used waitFor function of React testing library in enzyme test.

import { waitFor } from '@testing-library/react';

it('render component', async () => {

    const wrapper = mount(<Component {...props} />);
    await waitFor(() => {
       wrapper.update();
       expect(wrapper.find('.some-class')).toHaveLength(1);
    }
});

This solution will wait for our expect condition to fulfill. Inside expect condition you can assert on any HTML element which get rendered after the api call success.

1

this is a life saver

    export const waitForComponentToPaint = async (wrapper: any) => {
  await act(async () => {
    await new Promise(resolve => setTimeout(resolve, 0));
    await wait(0);
    wrapper.update();
  });
};

in test

await waitForComponentToPaint(wrapper);
2
  • Where do you get wait from?
    – Smokin Joe
    Feb 15, 2021 at 19:15
  • I'm guessing it's just a wrapper for setTimeout. My implementation looks like this export const timeout = (ms: number) => new Promise((resolve) => setTimeout(() => resolve(true), ms)); May 18, 2021 at 7:29
0

After lots of experimentation I have come up with a solution that finally works for me, and hopefully will fit your purpose.

See below

import React from "react";
import { mount } from "enzyme";
import { act } from 'react-dom/test-utils';
import App from "./App";

describe("app", () => {
  it("should render", async () => {
    const wrapper = mount(<App />);

    await new Promise((resolve) => setImmediate(resolve));
    await act(
      () =>
        new Promise((resolve) => {
          resolve();
        })
    );
    wrapper.update();
    // data loaded
  });
});
0

There are lots of answers here that are correct, but I want to emphasize an important commonality in all of the answers... which is that they're using enzyme's mount. I found out the hard way that using shallow will not work!

This might seem like a minor detail, but in researching this problem I also came across a lot of advice (such as this blog post) to use the render method from @testing-library/react - that's ok, but IMO testing with enzyme is much more useful, because it allows you to access the find method to make assertions much more clearly about your component's children.

I eventually got this working using a relatively clean looking version from @Supriya Gole's answer. To pile on, here's how my code looks :

import { mount } from 'enzyme';
import { waitFor } from '@testing-library/react';
import { MyComponent } from '../MyComponent';
import { SubComponent } from '../SubComponent';

describe('MyComponent', () => {
  const defaultProps = { bla: 'bla' };

  it('does stuff', () => {
    const component = mount(<MyComponent {...defaultProps} />);
    await waitFor(() => {
      component.update();
      expect(component.find(SubComponent)).toHaveLength(1);
    });
    shallowSnapshot(<MyComponent {...defaultProps} />);
  });
});

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