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I want to take two values from a list and then add them. I want to do it with try and except blocks. Pycharm shows no problem. But the output shows nothing or "None". Here's the code:

def tryint():
    global mylist
    try:
        mylist = list[map(int, mylist)]
        ans = mylist[0] + mylist[1]
        return ans

    except:
        pass

a = input('First value: ')
b = input('Second value: ')
mylist = [a, b]
tryint()

I tried changing the tryint() to print(tryint()), but then it just shows "None". Also there are no Error messages.

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  • Don't link to code; put a minimum example that demonstrates your problem in the question itself. – chepner Jul 12 at 12:46
  • 2
    You are using [] braces instead of parenthesis () on line 4 mylist = list[map(int, mylist)] should be mylist = list(map(int, mylist)) – Tim Jul 12 at 12:49
  • 2
    Using global keyword is a bad practice in your use-case, you should do like this: a = int(input('First value: ')) – Shizzen83 Jul 12 at 12:51
  • 2
    Secondly, avoid the use of except without specifying an exception. In this case, you are catching a SyntaxError and silently ignoring it. The default return value in Python is None hence the value you are being returned. – Tim Jul 12 at 12:51
  • Your are using global so every time it create new list that's why it print None and No need for handle exception here. – soheshdoshi Jul 12 at 12:56
1

I'll use your code as a starting point on how we can improve your code

First the problems with your solution

# What you are trying to do is supply two parameters 
# this is better accomplished by supplying the parameters  
def tryint():                            
    global mylist            
    try:
        # As mentioned list is a method call so you need to use ()
        mylist = list[map(int, mylist)]
        # Try to only put the code you suspect might cause an exception
        # in your try/except block.
        ans = mylist[0] + mylist[1]
        return ans

    # Always provide the exception you are expecting or at least `Exception`
    # If your code isn't going to handle the exception don't handle it.
    except:
        pass

a = input('First value: ')
b = input('Second value: ')
mylist = [a, b]
tryint()

Next let us improve your origional solution

# The function now excepts two parameters
def try_int(a, b):
    try:
        # Only type conversion is in the try block
        a = int(a)
        b = int(b)
    # Only ValueError and TypeError are handled
    except (ValueError, TypeError):
        return None

    # At this point we can assume we have integers and safely
    # do the addition.
    return a + b

a = input("First value: ")
b = input("Second value: ")
print(try_int(a, b))

Now we pass in the input and parse the input only handling expected values.

But we can do better, by providing feedback immediately to your user.

def input_int(msg):
    # Keep trying until a valid value is added
    while True:
        value = input(msg)

        # Allow the user an out be entering nothing
        if not value:
            return None

        try:
            # Return a valid value
            return int(value)
        except ValueError:
            # Provide feedback
            print("Expected an integer value, please try again")

a = input_int("First value: ")
if a is None:
    exit()

b = input_int("Second value: ")
if b is None:
    exit()

# At this point we know we have two integers
print(a + b)
0

There are so many ways to do the thing you are doing, but I will show you the lines where you are making ERROR:-

def tryint():
    global mylist
    try:
        mylist = list(map(int, mylist))   # Here you have to use parrenthesis instead of square brackets.
        ans = mylist[0] + mylist[1]
        return ans

    except Exception as e:  # This is how you write exception handling.
        pass

a = input('First value: ')
b = input('Second value: ')
mylist = [a, b]
tryint()

Output

First value: 5
Second value: 4
9

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