0

So I am loading a JSON file containing a proxies,

my JSON Object .

 {  
   "http":{  
      "http://":"64.90.50.38:45876/",
      "http://":"89.250.220.40:54687/",
      "http://":"89.207.92.146:37766/",
      "http://":"89.23.194.174:8080/",
      "http://":"82.208.111.100:52480/"
   }
}

I want to access each proxy but I keep getting the last proxy which is "http://":"82.208.111.100:52480/

my code :

import json
x = open('proxy.json', 'r')
data = json.load(x)
print data['http']

My Question is : how can I access these values with the same key ?

1

As per the documentation

The RFC specifies that the names within a JSON object should be unique, but does not mandate how repeated names in JSON objects should be handled. By default, this module does not raise an exception; instead, it ignores all but the last name-value pair for a given name:

>>> weird_json = '{"x": 1, "x": 2, "x": 3}'
>>> json.loads(weird_json)
{'x': 3}

The object_pairs_hook parameter can be used to alter this behavior.

Documentation also state that object_pairs_hook is an optional function that will be called with the result of any object literal decoded with an ordered list of pairs. The return value of object_pairs_hook will be used instead of the dict. This feature can be used to implement custom decoders. If object_hook is also defined, the object_pairs_hook takes priority.

For example,

Python 3.7.4 (tags/v3.7.4:e09359112e, Jul  8 2019, 19:29:22) [MSC v.1916 32 bit (Intel)] on win32
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> import json
>>> from collections import defaultdict
>>> from pprint import pprint
>>>
>>> s = """
... {
...    "http":{
...       "http://":"64.90.50.38:45876/",
...       "http://":"89.250.220.40:54687/",
...       "http://":"89.207.92.146:37766/",
...       "http://":"89.23.194.174:8080/",
...       "http://":"82.208.111.100:52480/"
...    }
... }
... """
>>>
>>> def custom_hook(obj):
...     # Identify dictionary with duplicate keys...
...     # If found create a separate dict with single key and val and as list.
...     if len(obj) > 1 and len(set(i for i, j in obj)) == 1:
...         data_dict = defaultdict(list)
...         for i, j in obj:
...             data_dict[i].append(j)
...         return dict(data_dict)
...     return dict(obj)
...
>>> data = json.loads(s, object_pairs_hook=custom_hook)
>>> pprint(data)
{'http': {'http://': ['64.90.50.38:45876/',
                      '89.250.220.40:54687/',
                      '89.207.92.146:37766/',
                      '89.23.194.174:8080/',
                      '82.208.111.100:52480/']}}
>>>
>>> pprint(data['http'])
{'http://': ['64.90.50.38:45876/',
             '89.250.220.40:54687/',
             '89.207.92.146:37766/',
             '89.23.194.174:8080/',
             '82.208.111.100:52480/']}
1

Python dictionaries cannot have duplicate keys. If there are duplicate keys in the definition of the dictionary, the last key:value pair will be used.

The JSON object is converted to a Python dictionary by json.load.

1

The usual approach is to have a data structure that supports holding multiple values. For example

{  
   "http": [
      "64.90.50.38:45876",
      "89.250.220.40:54687",
      "89.207.92.146:37766",
      "89.23.194.174:8080",
      "82.208.111.100:52480"
   ]
}

Your code would then print ["64.90.50.38:45876", "89.250.220.40:54687", ...]

Django, for example, has MultiValueDict that you can then load your data into to provide a nicer API. The source can be found here.

0

Too slow, but if you can change the JSON, why not make it a list?

{  
   "http": [
       "64.90.50.38:45876",
       "89.250.220.40:54687",
       "89.207.92.146:37766",
       "89.23.194.174:8080",
       "82.208.111.100:52480"
   ]
}

You can then parse the data as follows:

with open('proxy.json', 'r) as json_data:
    proxy_data = json.load(json_data)

And access it:

proxy_data['http'][0]

>>> 'http://64.90.50.38:45876/'

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.