2

I need to know how to make an animated loading sign in Perl for keeping people entertained while my program's checking for updates.

I've already tried using

print ".";
sleep(0.1);
print ".";

but that doesn't seem to work. Somebody please help me!

print ".";
sleep(0.1);
print ".";

isn't working

I just want the program to wait 1/10th of a second to print the next .

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  • If i understand you correctly the main problem you have is that both dots '..' show up together and not one after the other with a little delay in between. This is because perl does caching of writes to STDOUT (Standard Output, this is what you would think of as whats written on the display). To make perl instantly print you can set the special variable $| to 1 $| = 1;. This will cause Perl to instantly print without waiting for a line to be finished [perldoc.perl.org/perlvar.html] – Simerax Jul 12 at 18:59
  • 1
    You might consider accepting one of the answers below. See What should I do when someone answers my question? – Rob yesterday
4

Using Time::HiRes for sub-second timing needs, a few ways

use warnings;
use strict;
use feature 'say';    
use Time::HiRes qw(sleep);

STDOUT->autoflush(1);  # or $| = 1;
my $tot_sleep = 0; 

# Print dots
print "Loading "; 
while (1) {
    $tot_sleep += sleep 0.1;  print ".";
    last if $tot_sleep >= 2;
} 
say " done\n";  $tot_sleep = 0;

# Print "spinning" cursor while waiting
print "Loading ... ";
WAIT: while (1) { 
    for (qw(- \ | /)) {
        print;  $tot_sleep += sleep (0.1);  print "\b";
        last WAIT if $tot_sleep >= 2;
    }   
}
say "\b done\n";

# Print (overwrite) percentile completed (if you know how long it takes)
my $tot_percent = 0;  
while ($tot_percent < 100) { 
    $tot_percent += 5;  
    print "Loading ... $tot_percent%\r"; 
    sleep 0.1;
} 
say "\n";

I simulate "completion" (of loading) by adding up waits to 2 seconds. The if checks of this time thus stand for checks of whether "loading" completed, what presumably can be done at that point in the code (if it is a separate thread/process, or if this code runs in a forked process).


For a perhaps nicer "spinner" can use

use Time::HiRes qw(sleep);
use utf8;
use open qw(:std :encoding(UTF-8));
STDOUT->autoflush(1);

print "Waiting ... ";
WAIT: {
    my $tot_sleep;
    while (1) {
        for ('◑', '◒', '◐', '◓') {
            print; $tot_sleep += sleep 0.1; print "\b";
            last WAIT if $tot_sleep >= 5;
        }   
    }
};
say "\b done";

Idea for symbols borrowed from Term::Spinner::Color.

Such "spinners" of course don't give the visual clues of how long they wait(ed), like dots do.

  • 1
    Nice unicode spinner! :) Note, I needed to add binmode STDOUT, ':utf8'; STDOUT->autoflush(1); to the last snippet to make it work in my gnome-terminal.. – Håkon Hægland Jul 12 at 18:38
  • 1
    @HåkonHægland Ah, thank you! I tested in a script along with Term::Spinner::Color, and the module apparently has those set up so I forgot. Fixed – zdim Jul 12 at 18:45
3

The existing solutions assume you actually want to sleep/wait. They're not easily adapted to replacing the sleep/wait with actual work. My solution is for when you're you're doing actual work (e.g. loading), not just waiting for something.

use Time::HiRes qw( );

$| = 1;

{
   my @syms = qw( - \ | / );
   my ( $i, $t );

   sub start_spinner {
      $t = Time::HiRes::time;
      $i = 0;
      print $syms[$i];
   }

   sub update_spinner {
      my $now = Time::HiRes::time;
      return if $now - $time < 0.1;  # Prevent spinner from spinning too fast.

      $time = $now;
      $i = ( $i + 1 ) % @syms;
      print "\b$syms[$i]";
   }

   sub stop_spinner {
      print "\b \b";
   }
}

start_spinner();
for (1..500) {
   update_spinner();          # Call this as often as possible.
   Time::HiRes::sleep(0.01);  # Simulate a little bit of work.
}
stop_spinner();

The key is using Time::HiRes's higher-resolution time (and sleep, if necessary), as well a rate limiter (return if $now - $time < 0.1;).

If you really do want to print a line of dots, the same approach can be used.

{
   my $t;

   sub start_spinner {
      $t = Time::HiRes::time;
   }

   sub update_spinner {
      my $now = Time::HiRes::time;
      return if $now - $time < 0.1;  # Prevent spinner from spinning too fast.

      $time = $now;
      print ".";
   }

   sub stop_spinner {
      print "\n";
   }
}
2

The standard sleep function operates in integer seconds. You can use the sleep functions from Time::HiRes as a drop-in replacement that supports fractional seconds.

use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::HiRes 'sleep';

sleep 0.1;
  • Don't forget to STDOUT->autoflush(1). – melpomene Jul 12 at 17:29
1

Yet another way, without using a module is by abusing select():

use warnings;
use strict;
$|=1;

while (1){
    print '.';
    select(undef, undef, undef, 0.1);
}

Or, a FreeBSD-style spinner for fun (uses a Linux system call to refresh screen. On Windows, change clear to cls):

while (1){
    for (qw(- \ | / -)){
        system 'clear';
        print $_;
        select(undef, undef, undef, 0.1);
    }
}

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