6

I want to list in array format how many in each Diet group (there are four) have Time > 21.

I have tried to solve this in RStudio.

data(ChickWeight)
newdata <- subset(ChickWeight, Time >= 21, select=Diet)

In order to find how many observations are in newdata, I used nrow(newdata), but I would like to find out how many observations meet the criteria just by making it a part of this expression:

newdata <- subset(ChickWeight, Time >= 21, select=Diet) 

so that when I display newdata the table will also contain the number of observations that meet the criteria in a new column.

Desire output:

Diet   Number Observations
1      200 (I just created the numbers for this column as examples)
2       75
3      150
4      100 

Is there a way to do that?

  • and the obs count would be a repeating number in a different column of newdata? What about newdata$obs_count <- nrow(newdata)? – avid_useR Jul 12 at 17:13
  • I would like it displayed this way: Diet Number Observations 1 200 (what # is) 2 300 (what # is) 3 75 (what # is) 4 25 (what # is) avid_useR: When I ran yours, I got NULL. – Metsfan Jul 12 at 17:19
  • Please post your desired output in the question body itself – avid_useR Jul 12 at 17:20
  • So basically you want to get the obs count for each Diet group? – avid_useR Jul 12 at 17:25
5

It can be done in base:

transform(table(Diet=subset(ChickWeight, Time >= 21, select=Diet)))

#>   Diet Freq
#> 1    1   16
#> 2    2   10
#> 3    3   10
#> 4    4    9
  • M-M, thanks. It works. What is the purpose of "table"? Why is it needed? – Metsfan Jul 12 at 17:56
  • @Metsfan You can read about it by running ?table(). In short, table gives a cross tab with frequencies. I am just transforming it later to change the direction of output (run the code without transform to see). You should run table on couple more dataframes that you have to know what it does better. – M-M Jul 12 at 18:01
  • When I ran it without transform I got this error: "Error in subset.data.frame(ChickWeight, select = Diet, weight) : 'subset' must be logical" – Metsfan Jul 12 at 18:09
  • @Metsfan Are you assigning that to a column or something? For testing, just run that line without anything else before or after: table(Diet=subset(ChickWeight, Time >= 21, select=Diet)) – M-M Jul 12 at 18:12
  • Okay, now it worked. I noticed that it converted the rows into columns. Interesting. Thanks again. – Metsfan Jul 12 at 18:17
1

Consider a straightforward aggregate after the subset call:

newdata <- subset(ChickWeight, Time >= 21, select=Diet)

aggregate(cbind(Obs=Diet) ~ Diet, newdata, FUN=length)

#   Diet Obs
# 1    1  16
# 2    2  10
# 3    3  10
# 4    4   9
1

We can do this with summarize from dplyr:

library(dplyr)

newdata %>%
  group_by(Diet) %>%
  summarize(Num_Obs = n())

We can even combine the subset to a single dplyr workflow:

ChickWeight %>%
  filter(Time >= 21) %>%
  group_by(Diet) %>%
  summarize(Num_Obs = n())

Output:

# A tibble: 4 x 2
  Diet  Num_Obs
  <fct>   <int>
1 1          16
2 2          10
3 3          10
4 4           9
0

Here is a data table approach

library(data.table)
df <- as.data.table(ChickWeight)

df[Time >= 21, .(Number = .N), by = Diet]
#    Diet Number
# 1:    1     16
# 2:    2     10
# 3:    3     10
# 4:    4      9

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