10
async function test() {
  (async () => {            
    var a = await this.test1();
    var b = await this.test2(a);
    var c = await this.test3(b);  
    this.doThis(a,b,c);                              
  })();
}

What does it mean to put methods (test1,test2,test3) inside async () => {})()? I find it faster than

async function test() {          
  var a = await this.test1();
  var b = await this.test2(a);
  var c = await this.test3(b);  
  this.doThis(a,b,c); 
}

Any downside of using it?

  • It just seems faster because the returned promise doesn't doesn't actually wait for any of your sequential logic. You might as well change it to a synchronous function since the returned promise is basically a return Promise.resolve(); in the first case, which isn't useful at all. – Patrick Roberts Jul 12 at 20:14
  • if it's not useful at all, when should one use (async () => { })();? – bbusdriver Jul 12 at 20:36
  • At the top level, when you want access to async / await syntax. If that expression exists within another function, it means the caller of that function will not be able to know when the asynchronous calls have completed. – Patrick Roberts Jul 12 at 20:39
9

Both return a promise but they return different promises.

The first will return a promise that may resolve before this.test1()'s result resolves.

The second returns a promise that only resolves after the final call to this.doThis(a,b,c);.

This has been called the "fire and forget pattern":

Often in application development you want a process to call another thread and continue the process flow, without waiting for a response from the called thread. This pattern is called the “fire and forget” pattern.

You can see this in

function logEventually(str) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      console.log(str);
      resolve(null);
    }, 0);
  });
}

async function a() {
  await logEventually('in a 1');
  await logEventually('in a 2');
  await logEventually('in a 3');
  return await logEventually('end of a');
}

async function b() {
  (async () => {
    await logEventually('in b 1');
    await logEventually('in b 2');
    await logEventually('in b 3');
  })();
  return await logEventually('end of b');
}

a();
b();

  • Thanks. still not so sure when should one use (async () => {})(); – bbusdriver Jul 12 at 20:37
  • So if it resolves this.doThis(a,b,c); even before it resolves this.test1();, doesn't it mean that this.doThis(a,b,c); would error out? – bbusdriver Jul 12 at 20:40
  • @bbusdriver I added a note about the "fire and forget" pattern. I think it fits what's going on in your example. – Mike Samuel Jul 12 at 20:42
  • 1
    @MikeSamuel in regards to the "fire and forget" pattern, isn't the outer function generally synchronous? There's no reason for it to return a promise that doesn't actually wait for anything. – Patrick Roberts Jul 12 at 20:44
  • 1
    @bbusdriver. The promise returned by the whole may resolve before test1 resolves. The chain of awaits within the inner lambda still proceed in the order implied by the await statements. – Mike Samuel Jul 12 at 20:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.