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In a comment on my question regarding std::conjunction not short-circuiting (Conjuction template doesn't short circuit), I was recommended std::is_invocable_r as a workaround to my problem there. However as I tried to use it, I uncovered some very strange behaviour. For instance this code fails both asserts:

#include <type_traits>

int main()
{
    static_assert(!std::is_invocable_r_v<void, int(int), int>);
    static_assert(std::is_convertible_v<int,void>);
    return 0;
}

Note the description of is_invocable_r on cppreference:

Determines whether Fn can be invoked with the arguments ArgTypes... to yield a result that is convertible to R.

Clearly int is not convertible to void, and the second assert confirms it. The question is why does std::is_invocable_r_v<void, int(int), int> produce a true value then. Here is a live example: https://godbolt.org/z/HywH7D

Note that one can use std::is_void_v<std::invoke_result_t<int(int),int>> to get the correct answer here (https://godbolt.org/z/YMvc47), but this is not my question. (And it doesn't solve my problem from the conjunction question).

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  • 3
    You might read Callable for the definition of INVOKE which has indeed special behavior for void.
    – Jarod42
    Jul 13, 2019 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

4

Right after

Determines whether Fn can be invoked with the arguments ArgTypes... to yield a result that is convertible to R. ...

it gives a more strict definition:

... Formally, determines whether INVOKE<R>(declval<Fn>(), declval<ArgTypes>()...) is well formed when treated as an unevaluated operand, where INVOKE is the operation defined in Callable

And in Callable it's explained that INVOKE<void> is a special case. Rather than implicitly converting the return value to R, it uses static_cast<void>(...) (which is well-formed for any return type).

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  • Wait static_cast<void>(...) works for any return type, but is_convertible<int,void> is false? How do those two agree?
    – lightxbulb
    Jul 13, 2019 at 12:39
  • 1
    Just ignore the "Determines whether Fn can be invoked with the arguments ArgTypes... to yield a result that is convertible to R." part. As I see it, the page attempts to give you a simple imprecise explanation ("result ... is convertible to R"), and then goes into details of what exactly that means (if R is not void, result has to be implicitly convertible to R, otherwise result can have any type). Jul 13, 2019 at 12:49

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