3

I'm writing a module in C++ that accept dict.

How do I manipulate the pybind11::dict in C++

#include <pybind11/pybind11.h>
#include<iostream>
#include <pybind11/stl.h>
#include<map>

using namespace std;

namespace py = pybind11;

int main() {

    py::dict dict;
    dict["a"] = 1; // throws exception error - ptyes.h Line 546
    dict["b"] = 2; // throws exception error - ptyes.h Line 546

    for (auto item : dict)
    {
        std::cout << "key: " << item.first << ", value=" << item.second << std::endl;
    };
    system("pause");
    return 0;

}
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  • What exactly do you want to do?. Please elaborate with an example.
    – Shravan40
    Commented Jul 13, 2019 at 18:28
  • @AnthonyVisten Edit your question, do not post code in comments. And this example do not explain what you want to do... If you already know how to manipulate it, what do you want to do?
    – Holt
    Commented Jul 13, 2019 at 19:22
  • Why don`t you just use C++ map instead?
    – A.Ametov
    Commented Aug 8, 2019 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

5

Your code is not a module, it is a stand-alone C++ program that is using Python interpreter and it's your job to initialize the Python interpreter like it's written on https://pybind11.readthedocs.io/en/stable/advanced/embedding.html

Like this:

#include <pybind11/pybind11.h>
#include <pybind11/embed.h> // <= You need this header
#include<iostream>
#include <pybind11/stl.h>
#include<map>

using namespace std;

namespace py = pybind11;

int main() {
    py::scoped_interpreter guard{}; // <= Initialize the interpreter
    py::dict dict;
    dict["a"] = 1; // throws exception error - ptyes.h Line 546
    dict["b"] = 2; // throws exception error - ptyes.h Line 546

    for (auto item : dict)
    {
        std::cout << "key: " << item.first << ", value=" << item.second << std::endl;
    };
    system("pause");
    return 0;

}

When you implement a module you don't need the py::scoped_interpreter line.

Funny fact: your code would work a bit better (probably still crash at some point) if you used strings as values or large integers as values. By using small integers like 1 and 2 your code is hitting Python's small integer optimization (https://github.com/python/cpython/blob/3.8/Objects/longobject.c#L318) and crashes much faster.

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