31

The code below isn't working right for some inputs.

a, i = set(), 1
while i <= 10000:
    a.add(i)
    i <<= 1

N = int(input())
if N in a:
    print("True")
else:
    print("False")

My initial idea was to check for each input if it's a power of 2 by starting from 1 and multiplying by 2 until exceeding the input number, comparing at each step. Instead, I store all the powers of 2 in a set beforehand, in order to check a given input in O(1). How can this be improved?

87

Bit Manipulations

One approach would be to use bit manipulations:

(n & (n-1) == 0) and n != 0

Explanation: every power of 2 has exactly 1 bit set to 1 (the bit in that number's log base-2 index). So when subtracting 1 from it, that bit flips to 0 and all preceding bits flip to 1. That makes these 2 numbers the inverse of each other so when AND-ing them, we will get 0 as the result.

For example:

                    n = 8

decimal |   8 = 2**3   |  8 - 1 = 7   |   8 & 7 = 0
        |          ^   |              |
binary  |   1 0 0 0    |   0 1 1 1    |    1 0 0 0
        |   ^          |              |  & 0 1 1 1
index   |   3 2 1 0    |              |    -------
                                           0 0 0 0
-----------------------------------------------------
                    n = 5

decimal | 5 = 2**2 + 1 |  5 - 1 = 4   |   5 & 4 = 4
        |              |              |
binary  |    1 0 1     |    1 0 0     |    1 0 1
        |              |              |  & 1 0 0
index   |    2 1 0     |              |    ------
                                           1 0 0

So, in conclusion, whenever we subtract one from a number, AND the result with the number itself, and that becomes 0 - that number is a power of 2!

Of course, AND-ing anything with 0 will give 0, so we add the check for n != 0.


math functions

You could always use some math functions, but notice that using them without care could cause incorrect results:

import math

math.log(n, 2).is_integer()

Or:

math.log2(n).is_integer()
  • Worth noting that for any n <= 0, both functions will throw a ValueError as it is mathematically undefined (and therefore shouldn't present a logical problem).

Or:

abs(math.frexp(n)[0]) == 0.5
  • Should be noted as well that for some numbers these functions are not accurate and actually give FALSE RESULTS:

    • math.log(2**29, 2).is_integer() will give False
    • math.log2(2**49-1).is_integer() will give True
    • math.frexp(2**53+1)[0] == 0.5 will give True!!

    This is because math functions use floats, and those have an inherent accuracy problem.


Timing

According to the math docs, the log with a given base, actually calculates log(x)/log(base) which is obviously slow. log2 is said to be more accurate, and probably more efficient. Bit manipulations are simple operations, not calling any functions.

So the results are:

log with base=2: 0.67 sec

frexp: 0.52 sec

log2: 0.37 sec

bit ops: 0.2 sec

The code I used for these measures can be recreated in this REPL.

0
18

Refer to the excellent and detailed answer to "How to check if a number is a power of 2" — for C#. The equivalent Python implementation, also using the "bitwise and" operator &, is this:

def is_power_of_two(n):
    return (n != 0) and (n & (n-1) == 0)

As Python has arbitrary-precision integers, this works for any integer n as long as it fits into memory.

To summarize briefly the answer cited above: The first term, before the logical and operator, simply checks if n isn't 0 — and hence not a power of 2. The second term checks if it's a power of 2 by making sure that all bits after that bitwise & operation are 0. The bitwise operation is designed to be only True for powers of 2 — with one exception: if n (and thus all of its bits) were 0 to begin with.

To add to this: As the logical and "short-circuits" the evaluation of the two terms, it would be more efficient to reverse their order if, in a particular use case, it is less likely that a given n be 0 than it being a power of 2.

2

Note: this should be a comment on Tomerikoo's answer (currently the most upvoted) but unfortunately Stack Overflow won't let me comment due to reputation points.

Tomerikoo's answer is very well explained and thought-out. While it covers most applications, but I believe needs a slight modification to make it more robust against a trivial case. Their answer is:

(n & (n-1) == 0) and n != 0

The second half checks if the input is an actual 0 which would invalidate the bitwise-and logic. There is another one trivial case when this could happen: input is 1 and the bitwise-and takes place with 0 again, just on the second term. Strictly speaking, 2^0=1 of course but I doubt that it's useful for most applications. A trivial modification to account for that would be:

(n & (n-1) == 0) and (n != 0 and n-1 != 0)
2
  • 1
    Strictly speaking, 1 = 2^0 is a power of 2 - but I agree that this is an edge case that might be important depending on the use case. – CallMeStag Apr 16 at 14:30
  • You are right @CallMeStag and perhaps I was tunnel-visioning for my own application (the next step for me was to expand upon this and if provided integer wasn't already a power of 2, find the next higher number that is). Edited a bit for calrity. – gkampolis Apr 16 at 15:35
1

The bin builtin returns a string "0b1[01]?" (regex notation) for every strictly positive integer (if system memory suffices, that is), so that we can write the Boolean expression

'1' not in bin(abs(n))[3:]

that yields True for n that equals 0, 1 and 2**k.

1 is 2**0 so it is unquestionably a power of two, but 0 is not, unless you take into account the limit of x=2**k for k → -∞. Under the second assumption we can write simply

check0 = lambda n: '1' not in bin(abs(n))[3:]

and under the first one (excluding 0)

check1 = lambda n: '1' not in bin(abs(n))[3:] and n != 0

Of course the solution here proposed is just one of the many possible ones that
you can use to check if a number is a power of two... and for sure not the most
efficient one but I'm posting it in the sake of completeness :-)

1

Use *2 instead of bit shifts. Multiplication or addition are much more readable.

0
1

The following code checks whether n is a power of 2 or not:

def power_of_two(n):
    count = 0
    st = str(bin(n))
    st = st[2:]

    for i in range(0,len(st)):
        if(st[i] == '1'):
            count += 1
        
    if(count == 1):
        print("True")
    else:
        print("False")

Many beginners won't know how code like (n != 0) and (n & (n-1) == 0) works. But if we want to check whether a number is a power of 2 or not, we can convert the number to binary format and see it pretty clearly.

For Example:


      ^ (to the power of)

2^0 = 1    (Bin Value : 0000 0001)  
2^1 = 2    (Bin Value : 0000 0010)  
2^2 = 4    (Bin Value : 0000 0100)
2^3 = 8    (Bin Value : 0000 1000)
2^4 = 16   (Bin Value : 0001 0000)
2^5 = 32   (Bin Value : 0010 0000)
2^6 = 64   (Bin Value : 0100 0000)
2^7 = 128  (Bin Value : 1000 0000)

If you look at the binary values of all powers of 2, you can see that there is only one bit True. That's the logic in this program.

So If we count the number of 1 bit's in a binary number and if it is equal to 1, then the given number is power of 2, otherwise it is not.

-2

I have written a python function that will check the power of any number:

import math
def checkPowTwo(num):
  x = int(input("The power of the number to be calculated is: "))
  output = math.log(num, x)
  residue = output - int(output)
  if residue == 0:
    print (num, " is a power of the number desired.")
  else:
    print (num, " is not a power of the number desired.")
y = checkPowTwo(int(input()))

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