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PEM_read segfaults for me, in PEM_read_bio_ex. Looking at the sources, it handles the corner cases in the parsed file quite well, so I assume I'm calling PEM_read in a wrong way.

Backtrace starts with this:

#0  0x00007ffff46f6800 in PEM_read_bio_ex () from /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.1
#1  0x00007ffff46f6fd8 in PEM_read () from /usr/lib/x86_64-linux-gnu/libcrypto.so.1.1

The code in question:

FILE *fp = fopen(path_to_file.c_str(), "r");
char *name = NULL;
char *header = NULL;
unsigned char *openssl_data = NULL;
long *len = NULL;

PEM_read(fp, &name, &header, &openssl_data, len);
std::cout << "*name: " << *name << std::endl;
std::cout << "*header: " << *header << std::endl;
std::cout << "*len: " << *len << std::endl;

OPENSSL_free((void *) name);
OPENSSL_free((void *) header);
OPENSSL_free((void *) openssl_data);
OPENSSL_free((void *) len);

The tech stack is pretty standard: Ubuntu 18.04, GCC 7.4.0, OpenSSL 1.1.1.

Any pointers are greatly appreciated!

Also, if you knew about any guides or an article about PEM_write and PEM_read, that would be fantastic (my Google-fu fails here).

  • 1
    If you comment out the call to PEM_read, it will still segfault and the issue will be obvious. – David Schwartz Jul 14 '19 at 21:06
  • 1
    You're dereferencing a NULL pointer. – S.S. Anne Jul 14 '19 at 22:50
4

I believe you incorrectly used len param - passing a null address to write to.

FILE *fp = fopen(path_to_file.c_str(), "r");
char *name = NULL;
char *header = NULL;
unsigned char *openssl_data = NULL;
long len = 0;

PEM_read(fp, &name, &header, &openssl_data, &len);
std::cout << "*name: " << *name << std::endl;
std::cout << "*header: " << *header << std::endl;
std::cout << "len: " << len << std::endl;

OPENSSL_free((void *) name);
OPENSSL_free((void *) header);
OPENSSL_free((void *) openssl_data);
OPENSSL_free((void *) len);

To my experience, the best guides on using OpenSSL functions is going through the OpenSSL example app code. Otherwise, searching for a phrase PEM_read through Github may also work.

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