0

I have this piece of code.

import React, { useState, useEffect } from 'react';
export default function Example() {
const [object, setObject] = useState({
    count: 0
});

const onClick = () => {
    setObject(old => {
        old.count = old.count + 1;
        return old;
    });
};

return (
    <div>
        <p>You clicked {object.count} times</p>
        <button onClick={e => console.log(object.count)}>Show in log</button>
        <button onClick={onClick}>Click me</button>
    </div>
);
}

If you click the "Click me", it will increase the count property of the object. But for some reasons, if you click it, the object still get update but the component won't re-render. You can check the object's value it with "Show in log" button.

According to reactjs.org, whenever you set the state of a component, it will re-render. But if you write it like this, it won't.

But if i change the onClick function to

const onClick = () => {
    setObject(oldObject => {
        const newObject = { ...oldObject };
        newObject.count = oldObject.count + 1;
        return newObject;
    });
};

Then it will re-render the component.

Can anyone please explain what is causing the strange behavior?

1

What you are doing in your first code snippet mutates the original state -- which is almost always a big no go in React world. React usually only rerenders if some state or prop has changed, and since you mutate original state it doesn't look like state has changed.

In your second example you create a copy of the original state (const newObject = {...oldObject}). Mutating the copy and returning it is fine -- you are not mutating original state.

0

Try setting the object like this:

const onClick = () => {
  setObject({
    count: object.count + 1
  });
};
0

You need to return object. you are not returning right object. Trying doing like this :

const onClick = () => {
    // setObject({...object, count:object.count+1}); //another way

    setObject(old => {
      console.log(old)
        let updatedCount = old.count + 1
        return {...old,count: updatedCount};
    });
};

Live example : https://stackblitz.com/edit/react-sfjzgz

0

setObject is a dispatch function. React designed it the way, that the only thing you need to provide it is a new value, this value is to be considered a changed state.

What you do is, you provide a function type into the dispatch function, as well as then mutate the object given to you as a parameter of the function.

What you do

const onClick = () => {
    setObject(old => { // <-- a function is provided here
        old.count = old.count + 1;
        return old;
    });
};

What you need to do

const onClick = () => {
    setObject({...object, count: object.count + 1});
    // this way no mutation of the original state value is happening, 
    //and you are guaranteed to have a re-render.
};

And please stop calling variable object and setObject I know this is just an example, but posting this code snippet can very likely get you confused on type/name situation.

  • Thank you for your answer. This example is just a simple one so you can setObject directly like that. But because i was working with a complex object that needs to do multiple action before it can set the state. That's when i found out about this behavior. – Tạ Sinh Phúc Jul 15 at 8:57
  • Well you can change your object in whatever way you like, but don't change the original state object - always make a copy of it, and when you are happy about it, put it into setObject. Also don't try to keep everything in one state object, just a reminder. You can create as many state objects as you like. – George.S Jul 15 at 9:00
0

The reason why it behaves this way is beacause React uses the Object.is comparison algorithm.

If you update a State Hook to the same value as the current state, React will bail out without rendering the children or firing effects.

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