32

What is the correct way to change checkbox value?

option 1

import React, { useState } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

import "./styles.css";

function App() {
  const [x, setX] = useState(false);

  const soldCheckbox = ({ target: { checked } }) => {
    console.log(x, checked);
    setX(checked);
  };
  return (
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" checked={x} onChange={soldCheckbox} />
    </div>
  );
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);

option 2

import React, { useState } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

import "./styles.css";

function App() {
  const [x, setX] = useState(false);
  console.log(x);
  return (
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" checked={x} onChange={() => setX(!x)} />
    </div>
  );
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);

In fact, I think there's no difference, but I just wanted to hear a different opinion. Maybe something I do not know or there may be other solutions to this problem.

put on hold as primarily opinion-based by Kevin B, TylerH, Jeff Sloyer 2 days ago

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 3
    Both are correct, however abstracting the method from the input might be beneficial if you´re planning on reusing that method. – Webbanditten Jul 15 at 12:31
  • 3
    in this specific case, I would have chosen option 2, cleaner code in my opinion, setX changes the state, no need for a func calling setX and extracting the value from event if we know the value is x – Roy.B Jul 15 at 12:35
18

I think that it all depends on the situation.

The first option will be better if you have a lot of form and components. You can handle all with one handler.

const handler = (e) => {
  const { target } = e;
  const value = target.type === 'checkbox' ? target.checked : target.value;
  const { name } = target;

  setForm( f => ({ ...f, [name]: value }));
};

Second, if checkbox is one and the application must somehow react to its change. there is a third way to uncontrolled inputs.

10

Both ways are almost the same, but the first option actually is more redundant, let's analyze why:

Both the first and second methods are implementing controlled components

This means that you are providing a value and a way to change it, so the responsibility to update and control the values are abstracted from the component.

But why the first way is redundant?

You don't actually need to read from the e.target.checked cause it always reflects the local state x, so there is no need to read from e.target.checked and reverse it by doing: setX(!e.target.checked) since x and the e.target.checked will always be the same.

Caveats

Even though is fine to do onClick={e => parentHandler(e)} in a inline expression(arrow function) you should be careful, passing it like this to an input won't cause any problems, but when you are passing to a child component that implements React.memo or PureComponent for example, this will actually re render the component everytime, cause a new instance of the function is always created (signature is the same, but the shallow comparison will always return false cause they are different instances), so for optimization reasons is always best pass props like this: <Child onClick={this.clickHandler} id={item.id} /> and on the child: onClick={() => this.props.onClick(this.props.id)} instead of just: <Child onClick={e => this.onClick(item.id)} />

  • want to say that option 2 is faster than option 1 ? 2 options also have redundant action.how can you compare it all? – Klytaimnestra Jul 15 at 22:47
  • Not faster. Just semantics – Dupocas Jul 15 at 22:59
  • I understood you correctly ?.Option 1 is faster, option 2 is clean. – Klytaimnestra Jul 15 at 23:10
  • Both runtimes are pretty much the same. The only thing that changes is semantic. Both ways are perfectly fine – Dupocas Jul 15 at 23:37
7

In this specific case, I would have chosen option 2, cleaner code in my opinion.

setX changes the state, no need for a function calling setX and extracting the value from event if we know the value is x.

0

The only difference is clean coding, first way is better if you need to do something except changing state (for example to call an http request) and the second is good if you just need checkbox to work and store its value.

0

It looks like both of your options are equivalent. If we look at the documentation for the onChange event provided by React (not the change event provided by html) it states:

The onChange event behaves as you would expect it to: whenever a form field is changed, this event is fired.

We intentionally do not use the existing browser behavior because onChange is a misnomer for its behavior and React relies on this event to handle user input in real time.

https://reactjs.org/docs/dom-elements.html#onchange

So, simply choose the option that you think produces cleaner code.

  • 5
    Well, in the same directories written, creating functions in this onChange={() => setX(!x)} way is not always correct and may affect performance. – Klytaimnestra Jul 15 at 23:23
  • Are you saying that the value of x will sometimes be incorrect? or are you saying that declaring inline functions as props is a bad practice? I thought the OP was asking about the first question. – Xantix Jul 16 at 0:11
  • 2
    2. declaring inline functions.. it is so written in documentation. – Klytaimnestra Jul 16 at 0:30
0
import React, { useState } from "react";
import ReactDOM from "react-dom";

import "./styles.css";

function App() {
  const [x, setX] = useState(false);

  const soldCheckbox = ({ target: { checked } }) => {
    console.log(x, checked);
    setX(checked);
  };
  return (
    <div>
      <input type="checkbox" checked={x} onChange={soldCheckbox} />
    </div>
  );
}

const rootElement = document.getElementById("root");
ReactDOM.render(<App />, rootElement);
  • 5
    It's great that you took the time to try and answer the question, though you should really consider adding some explanation rather than just pasting a snippet. – li x Jul 16 at 12:06
-1

I'm always choosing option 1 because it is a way more generic way for defining form field change events. In most of the cases, I have something in generic form components

function SomeForm() {
   const [formData, setFormData] = useState({ name: "", accept: false });
   const onFieldChange = ({ target: { name, value, checked } }) => {
      if (typeof checked !== 'undefined') { // checking if we have a "checked" field inside target
         setFormData({ [name]: checked });
      }

      setFormData({ [name]: value });
   }

   return (
      <form>
        <input type="text" name="name" value={formData.name} onChange={onFieldChange} />
        <input type="checkbox" name="accept" checked={formData.accept} onChange={onFieldChange} />
      </form>
   )
}

The idea behind this is that any way we are going to receive a target DOM object which contains both checked and value, so we can make it generic.

Hope this helps

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